Marlin Firearms Forum banner

1 - 20 of 55 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
232 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
What do you folks think of the latest rifles being built by Remington? I am in the market for a 45-70 lever action and one of the rifles I am looking at is a new plain jane 1895. Prices are good at about $530 and I don't mind taking one apart and smoothing up the inners.
 

·
El Kabong
Joined
·
8,333 Posts
I would not buy one, there are lots of JM ones around.
Im just to that daring, besides Ill never wear out my 2002 in my life time (or whats left of it)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
198 Posts
I just did a side-by-side comparison of a newer 1895 and mine made in 1972. "Appalled" is not too strong a word. The first thing I noticed was a gap between wood and metal that I could literally see daylight through, and it went downhill from there. I would have preferred for Marlin to simply cease to exist than to see it's name on junk like that.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
953 Posts
Yeah, purchase in person and give it a good look over. It seems the latest trend is for the barrel to have canted sights from the barrel being tightened past the 12 o'clock position. Customer service still seems to be an issue so don't accept one with a problem thinking you'll send it in and Remington will take care of the issue. Recent posts seem to reflect it'll take at least two trips back for repairs...

But they appear to be putting out some good ones now too. Several have been posted here and bragged on. Just make sure to look it over.

-Bob
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
232 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
What would you look for when handling a new one? Just general fit and finish? Front sight lining up properly?
Anything else? Any issues with feeding or ejecting? I guess if I go this route I'll carry some dummy rounds and ask to cycle them through the action.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
8,595 Posts
You can find a real Marlin for that price or a little more and you'll have a whole lot more gun for the money.
+1... I wouldn't buy a new Remlin when you can buy good JM guns IMHO. Toooo many horror stories, and all the Remlins I have looked over look like a blind man assembled them with winter gloves on! :ahhhhh::ahhhhh:
Look for a JM gun and you WILL have a Lot LESS Headaches!!! :tee: Plus resale value on a JM gun is there, Remlins not too good.

Good luck
BloodGroove4570
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
222 Posts
I just purchased a brand new Marlin 1895GS 45-70... It is a Remline. There is a very very small gap where the stock meets the metal. Nothing serious as some that I have seen. I had to polish the bolt and lever. They were unpolished and filthy dirty. I also had some burs to take care of. I had a real bad bur where the magazine tube is loaded. It was leaving a very long stratch on the brass. Got that all smothed out. The rear part of the bolt patrudes past the back of the receiver which is cosmetic. Sights are dead on on mine. Also that the top of the reveiver and barrel has a very large scrape on it. It is def not an Originial model but I could not find any stainless around here for sale and the ones on GunBroker where way over priced. All-in-all not a deal. Gun shoots great. Mostly cosmetic stuff. Everything can be fixed by yourself if you have a little experiance with gunsmithing.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
732 Posts
I have seen some of the new 2014 remlins here locally. Just look them over real good for fit and finish, and check them for function, you might get a good one, but you would still be better off with a JM 2008 or older IMHO.
JB
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
70 Posts
I bought a new Remlin a few weeks ago, a GS. The store had 3. two of the three had serious mechanical problems( sights canted and misaligned, lever would not close every 5 to 8 cycles on the other one.
The one I bought had the worst wood but seemed mmechanically sound... the checkering is just rough wood. I took mine home, smoothed everything up (it was ROUGH! ) and fixed the lever plunger that did not have the angles milled properly/ lightened plunger spring and it is now smoother than my JM guns that have had no work. Fired a 1 1/8 inch group at 50 yds shooting off my knees with old ammo when I sighted in with an old scope. I think it will turn out to be a good gun but i should not have to go through that much work and quality control at the gun store to get to that point.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
232 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I think you confirmed it is mandatory to hold the rifle in your hand before buying. I plan on either getting a Henry or new Marlin but not without holding either of them in my hand and cycling some dummy rounds through the actions first.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Deadwood Pike

·
Registered
Joined
·
299 Posts
About a week ago I found an 1895 22" bbl 45-70, in a Fl pawnshop, which I purchased for $500 + tax and backround check. I stripped it down and cleaned it up and its near perfect, just a couple small scratches.
They are out there, JM Marlin from 1978, no cbs, excellent.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,368 Posts
I passed on 3 1895SBL's before buying the 4th one. As long as you look them over
check fit and finish you should be ok.
the older JM marlin is a great gun but very rare up where I live.
Guys hang out at the big gun store all day looking to get a deal on traded in guns.
So very hard to find anything used.

Remlins can be ok, but it's hit or miss. Work the action, check the trigger, the front site, etc...
Make sure the wood is a really good fit and that the stock isn't split esp. around the tang.

Good ones are out there.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
232 Posts
Discussion Starter · #15 ·
This might sound like a weird question but here goes. I'll be traveling through a couple of states starting next week end and plan on hitting what gun stores I find to purchase a Marlin 1895 and Henry, both in 45-70. I plan on making 4 dummy rounds to carry with me so hopefully I can run them any rifles I find to check for proper feeding and ejecting.
What is the max length I should make these dummy rounds?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,368 Posts
Just buy some snap caps in 45-70 and you will be good to go.
I use these in my pistols in 9mm and 45 acp.
I'm sure they have 45-70 one's out there.
Some gun shops might think they are live rounds and not let you chamber them.
Snap caps are well known that they are dummy rounds.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,239 Posts
I think you confirmed it is mandatory to hold the rifle in your hand before buying. I plan on either getting a Henry or new Marlin but not without holding either of them in my hand and cycling some dummy rounds through the actions first.
I've had a Henry 45-70 for several months, and hundreds of rounds, so just a heads up. Their barrels are made to SAMMI spec. diameters, that means a groove diameter of .456". As all factory jacketed ammunition is sized larger to accommodate every other manufacturer you can expect cooper fouling to be an ongoing issue. I reload, and even with cast, you're limited. As for fit, finish, and functionality, no complaints. I'm still working on finding a steel scope mount, as there are none available, and I'm not interested in their factory aluminum Weaver offering.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
232 Posts
Discussion Starter · #18 ·
4 snap caps are over $20. 4 dummy rounds are basically free as I can reuse the components after buying the rifle.
Besides the dummy rounds are light. I want to make sure the rifle can eject the heavier rounds with a bullet in the case.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,264 Posts
Of course if you can find a JM Marlin Its Gold like a Pre 64 Winchester
Yes Someday Rem levers may become like there Model 700 bolts but time and inspection of each one will produce a gem from time to time
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,269 Posts
Inpatients gets to all of us, but I just don't think Remington Quality Control is where it should be yet. I also think it depends on what day of the week the rifle was made.

As a Manufacturing Engineer, I have taken samples of products from the finished goods inventory across the production days of the week ( Mon -Friday). It has been my observation that quality product is affected by the production day. Now their are many more factors than just operator error that contribute to poor quality, but operators and day of the week are significantly correlated with the poor pieces.

To generalize just a bit, Monday production has a higher error rate for all shifts than the balance of the week. Tuesdays are a bit better than Monday for all shifts, and Wednesday is a golden day. Thursday is inconclusive and Fridays, Overtime days and hollidays more error.

My observations come from making diabetic syringes and aircraft parts. Both of these products are date and lot stamped. I am probably looking at apples and oranges because I have not been involved in firearm production on a mass scale. But as speculation as to why we see poorer quality in Marlin firearms it may have some validity.

Much of the operator inconsistency can be mitigated by operator inspection through the production process. If I were a betting man, I would think that Remington has not achieved this level of quality yet, thus the crap shoot on their Marlin Rifles.

This is just my opinion, and I know every one has an opinion. So who knows I do not work in their plant so its speculation for what that is worth. :hmmmm:
 
1 - 20 of 55 Posts
Top