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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Ordered a #43-275M mold from Accurate Molds this Morning.

My son shoots a .444 likely cause he doesn't have anything better like a 45/70 :flute: :flute: - can't teach those kids anything!

Has anyone have any experience with this mold?

I like the looks of some of the other molds better, but wanted to assure they would work OK in the .444 and according to Tom this bullet has the correct nose length ahead of the crimp groove.

My son has been loading my Lyman #429244 gas checked bullet and just seating deep enough to crimp over the front shoulder/driving band.

Says he is having pretty good results.

I am also thinking of giving this new bullet a try in the .44 mag where I have been mostly shooting a 310gr Wide Flat Nose from Lead bullet Technology.

Crusty Deary Ol'Coot
 

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I have the 43-265F. Close but no see-gar.
I can say it pours well and shoots pretty dang good.
Didja get aluminum, steel or brass. I wanna try the brass but the disclaimers scare me off.
 

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You'll probably want to size to .432" instead of .43". The front band might be better as a full bore diameter. Other than that it looks like a good bullet. Tom has worked with a lot of guys around here with their 444 bullets, but I do not know any accounts of that particular bullet so keep us posted.
 

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.432 for the 444 and .433 or bigger for the Marlin in 44Mag.
 
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Looks like a good bullet. If you go a few to the right of the 275 in the catalog... You will see the 43280rp. I have shot that bullet . A accurate bullet but you will need a lee factory crimp die. Works great on deer and pigs.
 

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(...)
Didja get aluminum, steel or brass. I wanna try the brass but the disclaimers scare me off.
Tom's brass molds are great to work with... if you have wrists of steel. I have several of his 1-cavity brass molds for my .444 Handi-Rifle, and the quality of machining is fantastic. One of his freshly-cut brass molds is breathtaking to behold. They're heavy beasts, but work well with a slow rhythm (otherwise they'll overheat).

That being said....
I can't recommend his brass molds.
He added that disclaimer, because he had a few complaints about bullets not meeting specs - including some from me. Being only 12 miles away, and having a lot of free time, he invited me to his shop a few times, so we could get to the bottom of my particular problems. I took the rifle, the mold(s), the bullets, my sizing dies, my lead thermometer (to check calibration), everything involved...
While working with me, he decided that the evidence pointed to the formula he had developed to calculate mold expansion simply being inadequate for bullets over about 350 grains (particularly bullets over .41 caliber). With some tweaks, he was able to get me a mold that met my needs, and started milling some test molds to come up with a new "heavyweight" expansion formula (he does take his work quite seriously).

But... as soon as I got home, I realized what the problem had been all along: They're warped the moment they come off his CNC lathe.

The attached photo is the second to last brass mold I got from him. I was in his shop when he bored the cavity, and saw the perfectly-mated blocks before they went into the machine. But, by the time I got home and was installing some handles.... extreme warpage. I can fit a 0.013" feeler gage in that slot, the mold handle attachment screws had no tension on them, and the warpage only got worse when heat was applied.

I called him about the problem, and he mentioned a similar complaint from a gentleman in Washington, that claimed his .45-70 mold was badly warped when it arrived. So, I emailed the photos and some measurements, and a couple days later, a new mold showed up.
I called to thank him for the replacement, but he, through many indirect words, inferred that I and every other person having problems had abused and overheated our molds.
The next day, the brass mold "overheating" disclaimer was on the website.... :hmmmm:


I would gladly order an aluminum or iron mold from him, but I won't go near his brass molds. Even if he has worked out the bugs, that's not a path I want to go down again.
Great guy, and great service, otherwise. But stay away from the brass, unless it's a small caliber mold.


(I'm sorry about the poor quality of the photo. It's difficult to get a camera to focus on a light source or reflection.)

 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thanks for the replies folks!

I ordered a 4 cavity Aluminum mold and have some RCBS handles on the way for the 2 me Accurate molds.

The second mold is also 4 cavity Aluminum in a .30 caliber size. This is mostly intended as a fall back, push comes to shove mold for my son's .308 and 300 and my 30/06 and 300. 170gr.

The son is in a transition time with his company, and has packed up all his loading stuff. Needs to finish up a remodel of his up-state NY home and get ready to move back to Phoenix so he can work out of the home office. Owns a place in Ideeeeho and were it not for the job, would likely be living there.

So, will be awhile before he can test any of the .444 bullets.

Crusty Deary Ol'Coot
 

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That being said....
I can't recommend his brass molds.
Thanks for that - I'm not a slow caster and I selected aluminum for that reason.

BTW - for anyone ordering one of Tom's molds - when he wants to know what you're casting with, tell him exactly what you are casting with.
I dunno what magic fudge factor he uses but it's dead on for sizing. I spec'd .433 with WW and by golly that's what I get.
 

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Thanks for that - I'm not a slow caster and I selected aluminum for that reason.

BTW - for anyone ordering one of Tom's molds - when he wants to know what you're casting with, tell him exactly what you are casting with.
I dunno what magic fudge factor he uses but it's dead on for sizing. I spec'd .433 with WW and by golly that's what I get.
He started with published shrinkage rates for common alloys, obtained many different samples of said alloys from different sources, and tested the shrinkage rates first-hand, across the full spectrum of bullets that will fit in his mold blocks. The average shrinkage rates from those tests, along with expansion rates of the molds at average casting temperatures, went into a formula that he uses to calculate the dimensions for the cavity.
 
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