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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm new to this forum and would like to say howdy and ask a question. I have bought an older 336 and would like to improve it's trigger pull. I'm a life member of the kitchen table gunsmiths guild and aint afraid to work on my own guns. But I like to have as much insight and advice as I can get before I start. Thanks....Later,B.
 

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In the reference thread on main page .. Tuning a Marlin ..
 

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Ditto and welcome. It will be great to have another tinkerer amongst us. Let us know if you need more.

Enjoy,

Dave 8)
 

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Gunjunkie said:
In the reference thread on main page .. Tuning a Marlin ..
GJ,

I could not find that page :( Can you post a link please?

Thanks
Mad
 

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Hey BDavis - Welcome to the forum. Is this your first 336?

I am a BDavis too. Go figure.

Where is Ellenboro? In the mountains?

Brad Davis
 

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BDavis, Welcome aboard.

I have an older Marlin (1957) and always found the trigger to be excellent as it came from the factory. What exactly is yours doing? Is it damaged or rusted?
 

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Here is an excerpt from an old post on race tuneing a lever action, this section applying to the trigger"


TRIGGER GUARD ASSEMBLY
Unless you are experienced in working on sear surfaces, I recommend that you leave the trigger and sear alone.
Take the trigger plate in your hand and look down into it from the top side. You will see the trigger block safety spring. This spring also bears on the rear of the trigger. Using a small screwdriver under the short leg, the one bearing on top of the trigger safety block, pry up on the spring approximately 1/8". You want to bend this leg upward enough to relieve tension on the trigger safety block. Don't try to get all the bend in one try, but bend it up a little, try the trigger block safety for tension by pushing it up from the bottom behind the trigger. Continue bending and trying until you can easily move the safety block up with your finger. Leave enough tension so that the safety block always returns to it's down position.
Now look at the long leg of the spring where it bears on the rear of the trigger. Pry it up a little at a time to relieve some tension on the trigger. Be careful and don't kink the spring. You are only trying to relieve some of the tension. It is better to error on the safe side rather than having to buy a new spring.
Some people feel that the floppy two-piece trigger/sear in the Marlin is undesirable. There are after market one-piece triggers available to replace the Marlin trigger. These replacement triggers are also advertised to reduce the trigger pull weight and all the comments I have seen regarding these triggers has been positive.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I have an older Marlin (1957) and always found the trigger to be excellent as it came from the factory. What exactly is yours doing? Is it damaged or rusted?

Thanks Brushbuster....This is a newer gun, 1978. The action is very slick but the trigger is heavy and creepy. I'd just like to clean it up a bit.
Thanks to all for the replies and warm welcome....Later,B. :)
 
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