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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey everybody!

I just inherited some firearms from my dad - a 336C in .35 Rem and a 39A, both from the 1950s I think. I grew up using these rifles, but I haven't handled them in nearly 20 years. My questions concern the 336C...

First, I plan to use this rifle for occasional whitetails but I suck with iron sights. I was wondering what is a good scope for my model. I was on opticsplanet.com and I might as well have been reading Greek - I don't know anything about scopes, scope rings, mounts, reticles, etc. My only familiarity with scopes is in using what somebody else already had in place on their rifle. Any recommendations? I'd like to keep the whole thing around $300.

Second, ammo prices in this chamber have obviously changed since the 1980s! What little looking around I've done for .35 Rem ammo hasn't exactly yielded ideal results, with the cheapest ammo coming in around $1/shot. I don't mind spending that or more during whitetail season, but I was hoping for something cheaper to just play around with the rest of the year. Any suggestions?

Lastly, does anyone have experience with the .35 Rem against pigs? I may have an opportunity to hunt them next fall.

Thanks to anyone who responds. I look forward to learning from the members of this forum!

Dave
 

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Welcome here! Is your 35 drilled and tapped for scope base? Yes you can hunt pigs with 35, no problem. 200 grain core lokts and ranch dogs 35 cast mold would work.
 

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Hey everybody!

I just inherited some firearms from my dad - a 336C in .35 Rem and a 39A, both from the 1950s I think. I grew up using these rifles, but I haven't handled them in nearly 20 years. My questions concern the 336C...

First, I plan to use this rifle for occasional whitetails but I suck with iron sights. I was wondering what is a good scope for my model. I was on opticsplanet.com and I might as well have been reading Greek - I don't know anything about scopes, scope rings, mounts, reticles, etc. My only familiarity with scopes is in using what somebody else already had in place on their rifle. Any recommendations? I'd like to keep the whole thing around $300.

Second, ammo prices in this chamber have obviously changed since the 1980s! What little looking around I've done for .35 Rem ammo hasn't exactly yielded ideal results, with the cheapest ammo coming in around $1/shot. I don't mind spending that or more during whitetail season, but I was hoping for something cheaper to just play around with the rest of the year. Any suggestions?

Lastly, does anyone have experience with the .35 Rem against pigs? I may have an opportunity to hunt them next fall.

Thanks to anyone who responds. I look forward to learning from the members of this forum!

Dave
I hear ya on the pricing and availability on .35Rem ammo. It's changed quite drastically in 20+ yrs. I didn't hunt for 20yrs and when I started back again, I got sticker shock on the ammo pricing.

Any factory 200gr offering is more than enough for any pig. A 200gr .35Rem leaves a big hole....

Is you 336 drilled and tapped for a scope? As for the irons, they just take more practice.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Rooterpig: as for the rifle being drilled and tapped for a scope base, I'll have to check on that as I won't have the rifles here for another couple of days. I will assume that by cast mold you're talking about handloading, which I have never done - but I wouldn't be opposed to learning if it meant having an abundance of cheap ammo.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
LT: yeah, I haven't purchased anything but .22 LR in the past 20 years. I'll know more about whether or not the rifle is tapped and drilled in a couple of days when I take possession of the rifles.
 

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I believe many members would agree that a Nikon Pro-Staff 2-7 33mm is a good choice at around $130. As for rings and bases, boy is that gonna generate some conversation. Ther are a number of questions to ask yourself, such as:
* Will this be a "permanent" mount or will you want to take off the scope from time-to-time
* the question of low, medium or high rings depends on if you want to be able to use the iron sights for short-range, at what range you want to sight-in and others (I like the low rings)
* Quick release or permanent base
* Your budget...you can get a good base and rings for under $100...under $50 if you shop
* Gloss or matte finish (or silver!)
There are members who have much more experience than I who may chime in. Also educate yourself on the internet.

Hope this gets you started
 

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Just get a regular Weaver two-piece or one-piece base and a set of medium height Weaver quad lock rings. Add a decent 2-7x32mm scope and you're done. Nikon, Leupold, Redfield, are all making nice scopes for under $200.
 

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The whole process of casting , loading, and load development is not that hard to figure out , and would be very fulfilling . Ask questions on this forum , and you will get alot of help.
 

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You mention that your rifle is from the 1950's which means it might be what is called a "waffle top" which is favored by guys who collect Marlins. All it means is that the top of the receiver has rows of fine, squiggly lines in it as opposed to a smooth matte finish. The idea was to cut down on glare I guess. Many here would have a hard time drilling and tapping a waffle top Marlin but others would do it in a heartbeat. It's a common topic and there are people who feel strongly about it both ways. I look at it this way, Marlin didn't make the waffle top models for very many years but they DID make a lot of them. Prices are not that much different than non waffle top guns but, if I had one, I would keep it unfilled and hang onto it. I figure that every time one of the guys who don't care about it drills a waffle top, it makes the remaining undrilled guns just a little bit more special. Maybe the value won't change today but years from now when my kids or grand kids inherit them, I believe it'll make a difference. Collectors are a bunch of goofy, eccentric types and it's amazing how much some of them will pay for an item in original condition. It's just too easy to find guns made after the waffle tops that are drilled and tapped from the factory to justify messing up an original. But that's just me and yours might not even be a waffle top.

As for scopes, any quality variable in the 1-4 power or 2-7 range would work. I happen to like the old fixed power Weaver k4 scopes and they can be had for about $75 pretty easily. Never liked the looks of the weaver one piece mount but a ton of them have been used on marlins. Probably more than any other mount made and they always work. I prefer a Redfield or Leupold base and rings set.

Lastly, another sighting option to look into is a receiver peep sight. If your eyes are decent, you can equal scope accuracy out to about 100 yards which is great for hunting. Do some searches here on topics like peep sights, receiver sights, scopes, vintage scopes, reloading, cast bullets etc and you can have years of reading and learning at your fingertips.
 
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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
All of this definitely gives me a lot to consider...

I checked out prices on the Nikon Prostaff 2-7x32mm on opticsplanet.com and the price and reviews look great. I will be visiting a local sporting goods store soon to check one out.

If my rifle is not drilled/tapped for a scope, I'm assuming this is something a smith can do fairly easily?

Lastly, as I'm able to find cheap plinking ammo for my other rifles, I might be interested in loading my own .35 ammo.

When the rifle is in my possession, I'll post some pics.

Thanks, everyone!
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
You mention that your rifle is from the 1950's which means it might be what is called a "waffle top" which is favored by guys who collect Marlins. All it means is that the top of the receiver has rows of fine, squiggly lines in it as opposed to a smooth matte finish. The idea was to cut down on glare I guess. Many here would have a hard time drilling and tapping a waffletop Marlin but others would do it in a heartbeat. It's a common topic and there are people who feel strongly about it both ways. I look at it this way, Marlin didn't make the waffletop models for very many years but they DID make a lot of them. Prices are not that much different than non waffletop guns but, if I had one, I would keep it undrilled and hang onto it. I figure that every time one of the guys who don't care about it drills a waffletop, it makes the remaining undrilled guns just a little bit more special. Maybe the value won't change today but years from now when my kids or grandkids are inherit them, I believe it'll make a difference. Collectors are a bunch of goofy, eccentric types and it's amazing how much some of them will pay for an item in original condition. It's just too easy to find guns made after the waffletops that are drilled and tapped from the factory to justify messing up an original. But that's just me and yours might not even be a waffle top.

As for scopes, any quality variable in the 1-4 power or 2-7 range would work. I happen to like the old fixed power Weaver k4 scopes and they can be had for about $75 pretty easily. Never liked the looks of the weaver one piece mount but a ton of them have been used on marlins. Probably more than any other mount made and they always work. I prefer a Redfield or Leupold base and rings set.

Lastly, another sighting option to look into is a receiver peep sight. If your eyes are decent, you can equal scope accuracy out to about 100 yards which is great for hunting. Do some searches here on topics like peep sights, receiver sights, scopes, vintage scopes, reloading, cast bullets etc and you can have years of reading and learning at your fingertips.
Well, I guess this adds a whole new something to think about. I can't recall if this rifle has the "waffle top" or not... it's been many years since I've used it. I just remember that while I liked firing it, I have never been good with the buckhorn style sights when it came to smaller targets like bottles and cans.
 

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LT: yeah, I haven't purchased anything but .22 LR in the past 20 years. I'll know more about whether or not the rifle is tapped and drilled in a couple of days when I take possession of the rifles.
Btw, with the exception of Grizzlies, there's nothing in N. America that a factory .35Rem 200gr boolit can't put on the ground fairly quick within it's range. It's a very effective cartridge..
 

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Just get a regular Weaver two-piece or one-piece base and a set of medium height Weaver quad lock rings. Add a decent 2-7x32mm scope and you're done. Nikon, Leupold, Redfield, are all making nice scopes for under $200.
Ditto, good advice up ^^^^there
 

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If my rifle is not drilled/tapped for a scope, I'm assuming this is something a smith can do fairly easily?
I know that you are new here but... those words will find you guilty of treason against the Waffle Top Guild. Those very words will incite a riot.
 
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LeverGunGuy, You have an exquisite rifle in your waffle top 336. I have 2 of them, one 30-30 and one 35, both of which are "go to" rifles of the type. I am 65 years old and my eyes are not what they once were but I am very successful with aperture or peep (receiver) sights. I think, with minimal practice, you will find that such a sight will work for you at any range suitable to the rifle and game. Your waffle top is drilled and tapped for such a sight which you can install yourself.

Receiver sights are made by Williams Gunsight Company and Lyman and usually cost under $100. A recent entry into the field is a fello in Canada; Howard Neufeld, 42 Maplewood Crescent, Morden, Manitoba R6M 1V6 who makes an excellent sight for $150. I think it would be a shame to drill your rifle for a scope.
 
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for simplicity i recommend the Talley Light Weight mounts. they are rings with a built in base and you can get them for about $55 shipped. you can google talley and call their customer service line and talk directly to knowledgable people. for a economy scope, the bushnell sportsman 4x32 works great on marlins. they are a little big for my tastes but i have one on a marlin and it is really functional. you can get them now from natchez shooting supplies for $19.95 which is a real bargain. for the ammo, look for remington 200 grain corelokts. the winchester and federal 200 grain are just as good. stay away from the 150 grain. if your gun is not drilled and tapped, buy the scope and mounts and take the whole mess to a good gunsmith and have him mount and boresight it. money well spent.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Well, everyone has certainly given me a lot to think about here, whether advice on scopes or ammunition or even peep sights. I am certainly grateful for input on the "waffle top" feature... this is something I was unaware of until you folks informed me. As such, I now believe adding a scope to this rifle might be a bit sacrilegious... kind of like making a street rod out of a pristine '65 Mustang, if you get my meaning.

I think I'm going to really like this site, and I look forward to tapping you all for more information as I get reacquainted with the Marlins.
 

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Check out skinner sights. My '52 RC waffle is getting the barrel mounted sights. I've got plenty of scoped guns but sometimes you just NEED one with oppen sights. I'm thinking mine will be my new coyote gun while in the brush and deep thick woods. I'm scratching up my side mirror shooting the XS7.
 
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Yes, any gunsmith worth the name can drill and tap for a scope mount. I'm of the "customize it to suit you" group, but receiver sights are certainly an option for those of us with old eyes. Makes it much easier to focus on the front sight! I have them on several rifles that I just didn't want to put a scope on. It has been years since I could effectively use blade and post sights on a rifle...
 

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LGG, welcome to MO!! We have lots of folks with lots of knowledge about our favorite topic,Marlins. Once you have posted pictures we may be better able to help with your decision. You may have noticed we do have our opinions on this site, but in the end it will be up to you to decide just what to do with your heirlooms. Take care, John.
 
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