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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I recently bought a 39A SN N126xx.

It's in very good shape, great wood, good bluing except for some wear on the receiver. The left of the barrel is drilled and has screws in the holes. 2 sets of 2 holes 2 3/8 inches apart. I guess this is a scope mount.

Question 1: Anyone know whether this was factory drilled? It sure looks it.

Question 2: What type of mount will fit these holes?

I know the N means it's a 1956 year. But I read somewhere that the standard length barrel is 24 inches. This one is 20 inches. It's NOT cut down.

Question3: What does a 20 inch barrel indicate?

I consider this to be in very good shape for being about 50 years old. I paid $175 for it. I was going to give it to my grandaughter but it's so nice I kept it and bought her a new Henry.. which seems to be a real good rifle too.

Question 4: Did I do allright on the price?

I know nothing about Marlins, but I'm learning.

Thanks for your help.
 

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I can't answer all the questions, but the holes on the barrel are for an old Weaver 'N' scope mount. I seem to recall Marlin made some 39As with the barrel drilled for these, but I believe it was on Sears contract guns only. It's not that difficult for a competent machininst to drill these and do a decent job. Some shops even made up a jig for the operation,

I'd say you did well with the price! :D SW
 

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I think you may have a Model 39-A Mountie. It had a 20" barrel. There are others here who are much more versed in the 39's and it's variants than I am, though.

WB
 

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Yes, you do have a version called Mountie. I have a 1955 vintage Marlin Mountie, just like your's except for the scope holes. As Hogger mentioned, these are not factory, but they were factory on Sears models. The mount is a Weaver, and they can be found, but not all that common anymore. A little searching at gun shows may turn one up on an early 3/4" tube scope. They aren't expensive when found, but you need to have the measurements in your wallet, and a tape measure, so when you see soemthing close, you can double check it. The base on these mounts was curved to match the barrel contour.
 

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Marlin did factory d&t the barrels for Sears. The usual scope that was used was a Weaver B-4 (4 X) in a N-3 mount. I believe Sears also offered a Weaver B-6 (6X) scope as an added value (extra cost) option. These 3/4" tube scopes were very good for their day. I have a B-4 that I still use- it holds a great zero.

The 20" barrel is a "Mountie" version of the 39-A, and was very popular in the 50's and 60's. It came from the Marlin factory with the 20" barrel and a straight gripped stock.

I'd say you have done very well on price. The Marlin .22 levers are very good shooters.

Regards,

Doc Sharptail
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
One more question: does that fact that it's a mountie version affect its value compared to the standard size version?

Thanks for all the great info, guys.
 

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The Mounties seem to have a bit more collector interest over the standard 24" barreled 39A's. Not huge premiums, but they generally run about 10% higher. The first year "K Mountie" will get huge premiums though!
 

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I have a new slant to the Sears/JC Higgins 39A question. I wondered if anyone has ever seen a Sears marked 39a? You would think that Sears (the Wal-Mart of the day) would have sold a decent number of them. I have not been in this hobby for that long but I have looked and have never seen a JC Higgins marked 39A. I am beginning to wonder whether all of the Sears, scope- ready guns (4 holes on the barrel), that I have seen were sold by Sears with the Marlin label. I noticed in Brophy's book (under the chapter on private label guns) that there was no "in house" 39a listed for Sears (in any year). Could it be that since the 39a was produced in such limited numbers (and was a flagship rifle for Marlin Firearms) that Sears sold it as a Marlin (but with the extra drill and tap job)? I am about to purchase an old Sears catalog just to find out.

Malinman93 - I am hoping you could weigh in.

Rob
 

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Doc is correct, and I should not have said they aren't factory for Marlin 39a's, but rather that they were factory, but only for those 39a's sold at Sears. On the hole spacing; I believe the correct spacing should be 2 3/8" between the inside set of holes, with each outter hole about 5/16" out from the inside holes.
I have one of the Weaver bases for a 39a Sears gun.-Vall
 

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Thanks Vall!

I asked for your opinion specifically because I value it. You have taught me a lot and I am very grateful. I can not tell you the number of times I have refered to older posts that you have submitted (and I am sure that I am not alone).

As pathetic as it may seem, I have been stuck on this question for some time - thanks for weighing in. The really confounding thing is that we all have seen certain Marlin models that were marked JC Higgins and Ted Williams, etc... I have forever assumed that Sears would market any 39A under its own brand. It was only after I realized that I never seemed to see any that I began to form this question. I plan to buy an old Sears catalogue from 1955 or 1956 because many of the rifles with the Sears type d/t seem to be M or N serial numbers. I will let you know what I find.

Thanks again for your help!

Rob
 
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