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First post here, so I hope I'm in the right place.

Only firearm I own is a Remington 770 in 30-06 (purchased in 2010), but have military experience, so have fired a variety of firearms and rounds, but no expert by any means. After a couple years, I realize a 30-06 is a little OP for CA hunting and 90%+ of shot opportunities will be under 200 yards anyway. Recently found myself in the market for a new rifle to use for upcoming deer (whitetail) season in California. Really set on lever action in .30-30. Narrowed my search down to either a new (not looking for used, and yes I've read about a million threads about the "Remlin" vs "JM" Marlins...) Marlin 336C or the Henry .30-30 (H009).

I know there's some differences between them, but as far as I'm concerned I'm viewing things as:
****Henry .30-30 (H009)****
PROS:
-Looks BEAUTIFUL
-XS Ghost Sights
-The engineering of space between the loop and the bottom of the rifle where the loop meets (supposed to prevent rubbing and wear on that part of the rifle).
-I've also read that the spacing between the barrel and magazine tube helps prevent issues when the barrel expands due to heat (whereas the Marlin 336C the barrel and tube seem to be pressed right against each other).
CONS:
-More expensive, ~$150-200 more, depending
-The top-tube loading with brass tube - I understand it is theoretically safer for unloading, and there shouldn't be a need to load more than the 5-6 rounds per hunt, but I appeal more to the "tactical expediency" of a side loading gate. This could be seen as a "border" con since I'm not totally against it.
-Report about not handling Hornady ammo well, which would be my preferred ammo.

****Marlin 336C****
PROS:
-Relatively cheaper price
-Side loading gate
CONS:
-Mixed opinion about quality (of new "Remlins") from online research
-Not as aesthetically pleasing compared to the Henry - this also isn't a very strong con, since I suppose I prefer function over form anyway (shooting deer with an ugly rifle is better than shooting no deer with a good looking rifle)

Only other notable difference worth mentioning, but that I didn't figure as a pro or con for either (just a preference thing) is that the Henry has a straight stock and the Marlin 336C has the pistol grip stock. So, basically looking for some insight on recent owners or users of these two rifles. Should I be concerned about new Marlin (i.e. Remlin) QC, still in 2015, or generally are the new Marlins picking up in quality? Price is a factor, although not the strongest one. I'm willing to spend a few extra bucks (no pun intended) for a more aesthetically pronounced rifle like the Henry, or for good quality. I've never used ghost ring sights, but I like the idea of them, especially at the shorter ranges (50-100-150 yards) - if I purchased the Marlin 336C, then would I have options for putting those on later? I don't plan on ever mounting a scope on either rifle. What seems more practical from experience: the Henry top loading brass tube or the Marlin 336C side loading gate?

I've watched just about every video and review I could find on youtube and these are the questions I'm left with. I've found a ton of great info on other sites, and particularly this one, but sometimes the threads are a few years old and I'm hoping for some updated opinions. Thanks a ton in advance!
 

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Never used ghost sights? Also known as a peep or aperture sight. No need to buy the rifle to find out what they are like. Punch a 0.200 inch hole in a thin, stiff piece of cardboard about 2" by 2". Hold it by a corner and look through the hole at a sheet of newsprint at a distance of two feet. See what letters you can pick out with the card and without. It might improve your focus a little. A 0.040 inch hole works much better but is slow to find the fore sight, unlike the big hole.
 

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Welcome. I'm new here myself, but I've been owning Marlins for over 15 years now.
I know you said you weren't interested in used, but maybe you should reconsider. A pre Remington-Marlin is a fine rifle.
Mine shoots 1"-1 1/4" groups at 100 yards with factory ammo, and handles great.

Sorry I can't really comment about the Henry, I've never shot or even handled that model of Henry. Nor do I know anyone who has. I do love Henry .22's, though. Looking at your pros and cons list, it seems you prefer the Henry.


I really hope freedom group takes a hike. They're ruining some of Americas greatest sporting guns.
Two of my favorite rifles are the 336 Marlin, and the 700 Remington.
 

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After what I have seen lately in the LGSs--buy Henry if you want a new rifle--there is no comparison in quality. This newest batch of 336C Remlins have all kinds of QA/QC issues--most have been covered in previous Rant threads that date back to 2010. Remlin STILL can't get it right.
 

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I own a 2014 built 336C, it was a bit tight in the action to start with so I followed some of the great directions on here to slick it up and also lighten up the trigger. Easy jobs to do yourself and a great way to familiarise yourself with the rifle. Trigger let off is now 1.6 kilo and the action is nice and smooth. The timber is nicely figured walnut, nothing special. The checkering is pretty average. The blueing is nice and deep. Most importantly is the accuracy, I use a Vortex SPARC red dot scope, my eyesight ain't what it used to be, with Federal 170gr I get 1.75moa in a 3 shot group, opening up to 2.5moa in a 5 shot group. I'm happy with that and recently used it on a pig hunt up to Cape York, I also took my Browning X Bolt in 308. I've always used bolt action rifles and this was my first hunt with a lever action, I shot many big hogs with both rifles, but I had the most enjoyment using the 30/30 Marlin, I loved it. It was faster to aquire targets, follow up shots and less recoil, even nailed a good scrub bull too. I can only comment on my Marlin, never owned a Henry.
 

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I purchased a new Remington made 336ss (stainless) in 30-30 and I'm very happy with my purchase. The gun is well made, functions well, and is accurate. I've seen the Henry's in the store and they are nice, but I like the convenience of the side loading gate. I have a pre-Remington JM-marked 336w that is an awesome gun as well. The JM marked gun has a slightly nicer finish and a lighter trigger weight, but the new 336ss shoots and functions as well as the older CT-made gun.

Whenever I'm in the local gun shops, I take a look at the Marlins on the rack. The ones made in the past couple of years really seem to be nicely made.

Good luck with your decision. The 30-30 is a nice round. The recoil is very manageable and has decent accuracy. Plus it's really easy to find (Walmart, Bass Pro, etc.).
 

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Well Turtlerock:

You've done your research and have nailed the Pros and Cons. The biggest objection is the price of the Henry compared to the Marlin. The Henry chambered in both 30-30 and 45-70 have the same retail price. However, there is no doubt in my mind that the Henry build quality is much better than the Marlin.

You might want to reconsider buying a new gun being that you are going hunt with it anyway. You can pick up a used JM Marlin cheap in 30-30. I would say that a used JM 30-30 can be had starting at $250 depending on where you live. The average price I see in Central PA is about $350. I've seen them price much higher but typically they don't sell or move slowly, unless the rifle is in almost new or unfired.

When I contacted Henry a few years ago asking about cycling problems with Hornady ammo in their H010 chambered in 45-70, they told me not to use it in that rifle. I never inquired about cycling their 30-30 with Hornady, but I don't know how much difference the caliber would make.

I have seen newer Marlins that have been built pretty well in the last year. The only caliber that I was not impressed with was the 336 chambered in 30-30. Just a few months ago I examined three of them on the rack at Grice's Gun Shop in Clearfield PA. The fit and finish on each one was very poor. If I was in the market for a 30-30 I would not have bought one. So I'm back to the used gun option again. If you were going to buy it to shine and wax to impress your friends, buy a new rifle. If you are going to hunt with it, the last thing you need to be concerned about is getting your firearm scratched up. Concentrate on the game, your target, and filling the freezer. Buy used to hunt, new to shine.



Cheers!


Mike T.
 

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There are times when selectioning a weapon, you just make the choice. What folks say may or may not sway you. In the end you are going to use it. cal is also a consideration.

How it feels to you. The look, etc. All factors.

Let me add to your possibles . A good used ,non cross bolt safety Marlin in great shape would be my choice.
 

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Never had a Henry, but, I prefer a straight stock lever gun. I've never really been comfortable with the pistol grip levers. I also prefer the pre-silly safety Marlins by far. Hold out for a nice Texan & you'll fall in love.

John...
 

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I hunt in Central Florida where you're bustin through palmetto, and thorn bushes/thick brush and I'm still trying to figure out how you scratch and ding up a rifle hunting?

Maybe climbing to stands, i don't know; mine somehow don't get scratched or dinged.......and if they do as long as it's "my ding", it's cool; part of the character. I don't want to carry around someone else's ding ;)

I assume you're talking about the round barrel steel Henry 30-30, not the brass as it is heavier and even more costly.

One "Pro" I didn't see mentioned is Henry customer service. I have never called, but I have heard numerous stories of free gifts along with replacement parts to include some very nice and expensive items.

If you're problem requires more than a quick fix, don't be surprised to get an email from the president of the company, and i'm not talking about some stupid "form" email, but a personal email. No, I am not exaggerating.

The Henry forum is just now starting to take off, and it's a great group if you have any questions. Just google "henry rifle forum"

On the other hand, I am very happy with my new XT-22ml, and plan to buy another XT-22 in 22lr as well as a model 60 within the next year or so. The horror stories about the Remlins have died off on youtube; most of them being from 2 or more years ago. I also prefer the side loading gate of the marlin, but I prefer the straight stock of the Henry.

Really this is a win/win as both are fine rifles.

Good luck with your puchase and please let us know what you decided.
 

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Personally, with the number of nice JM stamped Marlins out there, I don't know why anyone would buy a new one.

Maybe at some point the price will rise on the old guns, and it would make sense, but not in today's market.

I have only owned henry 22's. But, have handled enough of their rifles to be impressed with the quality of their fit&finish.

As for a gun getting beat up, I guess it all depends on the person, it's not too hard to take care of a rifle, even in tough conditions if you just try. I hunted with a browning citori for ducks from the mid 80's until just a few years ago, and it's still in very nice condition. They don't have to get beat up if you just keep an eye on things. Ya, a few dings and dents are eventually gonna happen, but it's not hard to keep them from getting all beat to heck. That said, some people just don't care if they beat them up, and that's ok too.

I once read an article on gun owners who hunt with their guns. It said there are two types. Those that feel the firearm is an integral part of the experience, and those that feel the firearm is just a tool used to kill the animal, no different than a shovel. I am in the former camp, and not the latter... ;D
 

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If you are determined to purchase new, go Henry. IMHO

...I agree.....their 'aftercare' is remarkable. Don't try the aftercare with Remlin......you might see it back after hunting season's over
 
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I hunt in Central Florida where you're bustin through palmetto, and thorn bushes/thick brush and I'm still trying to figure out how you scratch and ding up a rifle hunting?

Maybe climbing to stands, i don't know; mine somehow don't get scratched or dinged.......and if they do as long as it's "my ding", it's cool; part of the character. I don't want to carry around someone else's ding ;)

I assume you're talking about the round barrel steel Henry 30-30, not the brass as it is heavier and even more costly.

One "Pro" I didn't see mentioned is Henry customer service. I have never called, but I have heard numerous stories of free gifts along with replacement parts to include some very nice and expensive items.

If you're problem requires more than a quick fix, don't be surprised to get an email from the president of the company, and i'm not talking about some stupid "form" email, but a personal email. No, I am not exaggerating.

The Henry forum is just now starting to take off, and it's a great group if you have any questions. Just google "henry rifle forum"

On the other hand, I am very happy with my new XT-22ml, and plan to buy another XT-22 in 22lr as well as a model 60 within the next year or so. The horror stories about the Remlins have died off on youtube; most of them being from 2 or more years ago. I also prefer the side loading gate of the marlin, but I prefer the straight stock of the Henry.

Really this is a win/win as both are fine rifles.

Good luck with your puchase and please let us know what you decided.
Scratching a hunting rifle is pretty simple for me. I just take it hunting. :hmpf: I've leaned them on barbed wire fences to allow myself to climb over safely and as a result the rifle (unchambered) slides to the side, Scratch #1. Then while still hunting I suddenly see a glimpse of a deer sneaking along out in front of me, freezing in place I steady my rifle alongside a tree and drop the hammer, Ding #2 in the forearm as the recoil bumps it into the tree bark. After I get the deer gutted and back to my ATV, I again lean my rifle (unloaded) against the thing to pull the deer up onto the rack, bumping the scooter making it roll and the rifle hits the gravel road, Booger #3 is only on the scope. In my rush to get home before dark, I hastily load my gear and end up setting my unused tree stand on top of my rifle. Another boo boo on the barrel. Then I curse myself for not putting the rifle in the padded case first and bang it into the door jamb of the truck doing that.

Now I don't think I've done all of these things on the same hunt, but I've done them, while hunting with a few of my rifles. My handguns also get dinged and bumped into stuff along the way. My binoculars were accidently left on the 4 wheeler box as I drove away one time, to later be found by my hunting buddy before I knew they were missing. They are Steiner Military Marine binocs and only got good and muddy, that time, but it's just the way things go for me.

Am I the only one that this stuff happens to?

Anyway, not to get too lost in my thoughts, my point is to agree with others that said, Go with a used 336. They do shoot your favorite ammo well and that side loading gate is handy if you load and unload them as much as I seem to do. I do hope to get a Henry myself someday, when I grow up and learn how to hunt without dinging it up. :biggrin: After about 35 - 40 years of practice, I'm almost there.
 
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Welcome to Marlin Owners from Eastern Ontario, Cda. (Ottawa)

I bought a used (but still in the box) Remlin 336 BL. I fired it 20 times and sold it back to the same store where bought it, still in its original box.
I did not like the balance nor the extra weight. There was nothing wrong with the rifle as far as I could see. The store had sold it again, before I left the store. I left the store with a 336RC made in 1951 (H xxxxx). Best trade I ever made!

Sincerely,

MilPsych
 

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Both American made. Costing more don't necessarily mean better.
 

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New pick through the new Marlins until you find a nice one. I like Henry rifles and have a 45LC Golden Boy and it is not light. I would think the steel .30-30 may be a little lighter. However, I'm still partial to my Marlins. Used you can find some that are straight stocked.

Marlins are easily disassembled, for cleaning and tuning. Heard that the Henry rifles not so, but I wouldn't know. I haven't tried.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Great advice and feedback so far, I really really appreciate it.

sullivan said:
Never used ghost sights? Also known as a peep or aperture sight.
I've used aperture sights, more familiar with open irons though, and then a bunch of different ACOGs, but honestly never heard of the term ghost sight until looking into a new rifle - didn't know if ghost sights were somehow different from others, so please forgive my ignorance. If the Marine Corps didn't give it to me to learn to fire, then I don't know it.

cynergyou said:
I purchased a new Remington made 336ss (stainless) in 30-30 and I'm very happy with my purchase. The gun is well made, functions well, and is accurate.
I was considering the SS, appears to be the exact same rifle compared to the C besides being stainless steel. Then I read on a couple different forums that carbon steel may be preferred to stainless because stainless can get hot quicker, and is more prone to damage, any insights on carbon vs stainless? I don't plan to put a giant bucket of rounds through any rifle I purchase - maybe a handful of range visits each year and then hunting season.

miket156 said:
You might want to reconsider buying a new gun being that you are going hunt with it anyway.
LSUfan336 said:
I know you said you weren't interested in used, but maybe you should reconsider.
CallaoJoe said:
Personally, with the number of nice JM stamped Marlins out there, I don't know why anyone would buy a new one.
I appreciate the feedback on the older/used JM Marlins, and I've definitely heard great things about them, but I'm a little turned off from used because I really don't know that much about firearms except how to fire, dismantle, and clean the ones I've owned or been issued. Basically I just wouldn't know what to look for in a used rifle other than fit/finish (wobbly, unfitted parts, etc.). Not knowing exactly where that rifle has been, what kind of work has been done on it, etc, leaves me leery. Plus, I imagine, if something did go wrong with the rifle, then there is no manufacture warranty and I'd basically be forced to pay a shop for repairs and what not. How is buying a used weapon at a shop - should they be providing some kind of guarantee? I've poked around just a couple of my local GS and one only had some used Winchesters (very small shop) and the other (much bigger with indoor range) looked like it had maybe a couple used, but I didn't ask if they were Marlins. Based on considerations here, I'll at least go back there in the next couple days and ask which used models they have and what prices. They also had both the Marlin 336C and Henry .30-30 new, $580 and $780, respectively (there's a couple other shops in very close neighboring towns/cities that I plan to visit this weekend and friends say there are better prices at the places I haven't been to yet). My brother suggested going to online gun sales sites, but I'm definitely not sure about that, I'd prefer talking to someone face-to-face for this purchase, and I hear that most online purchases are no returns, so I'd want to at least hold and inspect the rifle myself before purchase.

With that . . .
Ret_Eng said:
buy Henry if you want a new rifle - there is no comparison in quality. This newest batch of 336C Remlins have all kinds of QA/QC issues
Henry88 said:
One "Pro" I didn't see is Henry customer service.
The Remlin QC issues are exactly what I'm afraid of in new. I'd rather spend the extra $200 up front for a Henry of it's more likely to be of higher quality and, all else equal, experience less QC issues. Anyone else agree or have experience with new (last couple of years) Marlins not turning out so well? Anyone that feels the new Marlins hold up and are a fine purchase?

Henry88, you're absolutely right, I have been reading great things about Henry customer service and that should be considered a pro, IMO.

Just watching a lot of the more extensive review videos and reading articles, the Henry does appear to have higher quality make - from the butt pad to the stock, from the matte black finish to the smooth cycling of the action - all things that I don't see standing out in too many Marlin reviews.

As a side note, I haven't seen the movie yet, but apparently Chris Pratt's character's weapon of choice in Jurassic World is a Marlin 1895 SBL in 45/70 and that rifle looks very nice.

Thanks again for all the insights and hopefully I can get some more responses and get any new questions answered. I would plan to post my decision here and even post a couple pics. :)
 

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New, pick through the new Marlins until you find a nice one. I like Henry rifles and have a 45LC Golden Boy and it is not light. I would think the steel .30-30 may be a little lighter. However, I'm still partial to my Marlins. Used you can find some that are straight stocked and some beautiful firearms.

Marlins are easily disassembled, for cleaning and tuning. Don't know about the Henry rifles.

Plenty of sight options for the Marlins too, ghost ring, peeps(receiver and tang) and different rear leafs. I would not trade any of my Marlins for a Henry. Then again this is a MarlinOwners.
 

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Personally I still like the tube feed of the Henry where you do not need to jack the action for every cartridge to unload. Lots of cartridges get messed up in the loading gate experience. While I cannot say about the 30-30 my Henry 22 magnum is a great little rifle. I would opt for the steel Henry.

DP
 
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