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Cool find! How big is it? I have owned several bench top metal lathes but sold my old South Bend 9A before my last move. Actually looking at a Heavy 10 right now for even more serious duties.
 

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Pretty much everything, never used or watched one being used. Welder by trade so my milling machines were a side grinder or a *** file. My wife's uncle has a little knowledge so I will be talking to him soon.
Maybe you could check out local High School or BOCES, see if they have adult classes.
 

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Discussion Starter #23
Cool find! How big is it? I have owned several bench top metal lathes but sold my old South Bend 9A before my last move. Actually looking at a Heavy 10 right now for even more serious duties.
It looks like it may handle stock up to maybe 18", I do have a 2" chuck with it and a couple of extra gears to adjust speed.
 

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I suggest you have someone who knows lathes to have a look at it before you start with projects.

There must be a reason why it was being discarded. Are the bearings ok? How about the gears and the feed mechanisms?

These can be fixed or replaced, but it they're out of spec, your projects will not turn out.

And it could all be just fine, too.
 

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Years and years experience on metal lathes, Im running one every day.If there's any questions you have,I will do my best to help. but there's a lot to absorb before becoming proficient..I will say the first thing is to make sure it is in good, proper working order before turning it on.
Watch every youtube vid you can for every different thing you want to do and go SLOW.
things you must have a solid understanding of before you get going are:
the complete workings of the machine.
"Speeds and Feeds".. very important! All different metals work best at different RPM's and feed rates of the cutter into the metals (feed rate) some metals like shallow passes with certain cuters, some like deeper passes. sadly, its a lot of practice to figure out the sweet spots for every different metal. some turn better at low RPM some like it screaming fast.. watch videos or get on some metal lathe forums, or I can give you some of my speed and feed rates when you're ready.

you cannot work all metals the same. stainless cannot be cut like brass.

carbide vs HSS vs ceramic cutters and inserts. there are a variety of different styles, and types, they all have their application. there is no universal cutter, different types for different metals. some love carbide, some prefer HSS. carbide lasts a long time, and HSS doesnt so be prepared to learn how to sharpen.. The ceramic inserts are my favorites.. generally, they have multiple sides so when they get a little dull, just rotate and keep going. they do last a long time unless you cook them or do something stupid.

I recommend getting lathe tools with replaceable cutting inserts first. then, learn to grind your own if you really want to go down a rabbit hole.

simple rules.. the center of the cutter must be set to the center axis of the work piece. no exceptions. you've got a good tool head, you can adjust the cutter height easily with that AXA head. buy as many of the tool holders as you can. One for each different cutter you have so you dont have to readjust or re mount new cutters in for different applications. My big lathe, it uses the BXA tool post ( just a little larger than the one you have) and I have almost 40 different individual holders with their own dedicated inserts.
Just take one out, drop a different one in, tighten the bar and go.
you should be able to get the manual online, I would recommend finding it and going over the lathe every piece and make sure everythings tight and right. Remember, metal moving at high RPM is no joke especially when theres sharp things being pushed into said metal. failures are often spectacular and terrifying.
go slow and ask questions. watch videos and get lots of scrap metal to play with, start with aluminum as its probably the easiest and cheapest to find. brass is the softest and easiest to turn, but "gummy" stainless is a pain as you will go 1/2 the speed and depths as regular steels. 303stainless is a good stainless to work with for starters... 316 and 304 are very difficult to start out with..
If you have a metal store source... find a steel called 12L14 its a good steel to machine with, its called a "free machining steel" it has a micro tid bit of lead in it and its very self lubricating. very common in the real world of steel products on the market.
 

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Good score. I saved an article from an old HANDLOADER magazine, the author used his hobby sized lathe like yours to make cast bullets hollow nose and others hollow base. Hollow nose for expansion on impact, and hollow base to fill revolver chamber throats for less leading and better accuracy. You got a pretty handy tool there. Lots of possibilities.
 

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Just got this today, was about to go in the scrap pile. It does work and I managed to find a parts box with more attachments. Now need someone to teach me to use it. View attachment 834788
Thats cool! Looks good .... small! ..... AC or DC?
You'll get the hang of it quickly - real simple.
Just take it slowly in the beginning and make sure of what you need to do, before piling in.
Also, if you are unsure use a suitable piece of scrap material to try out your idea first.
Enjoy!
:)
 

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SAFETY:
NEVER forget protective glasses_
beware: some cutting fluids/oils (the best here was Chesterton, efficient and poisonous, now banned :) here, of course) can stun you to fainting when brought to high temperatures_
no hair in the wind, dreadlocks, loose sleeves, please_
your fingers don't grow back again easily, etc. etc. _
for now, GO SLOW and STAY SAFE !
... and don'r "pick" swarf with your fingers, especially while the lathe is running ....... where'd my finger go? :p
 

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OP, find a mentor.

You cannot hand a guy a book and Black & Decker drill, and make him into a dentist.
Same as everything else, many hours of practice are needed to become proficient.
Many more hours are needed to become a master.

My Dad had a lathe room in his basement.
6-jaw chucks, etc, all the goodies accumulated over a life time.
His wife gave it all away for pennies on the dollar after he died.

Perhaps this is the source of your Jet... nothing wrong except the owner died.
 

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..PN, if you are looking for someone to teach you on-the-field, you're on the right path, of course _
I said this to a Welder, as you are::...a friend taught me the rudiments of stick welding, another one of gas welding, years ago I bought a TIG, and all the manuals, (I like tech.manuals) but I never did anything good until I went to get explained in a welding shop...enough said_
enjoy the new toy !
 

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I like the idea of taking a lathe class at a Voc Ed school. Some High schools still do that.
 

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Discussion Starter #36
A little more info on my new toy, it was in a modeling shop were different components to drones and scale pieces for an electro magnetic rail gun. Most of what was used in it was aluminum and some high density plastic. That's about all I can say about where it come from. Our taxes paid for it and typical of the waste I witness from time to time there was probably nothing wrong with it but that dept probably got funding for a new CNC machine or 3D printer. Anyway, mine now and I look forward to learning more about using it.
 

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evaluate how much it weighs and the dimensions of your lathe, and find or build a solid table on which to bolt it_ it is important that the support base is sturdy & solid, because the vibrations of it would be counterproductive for the precision of work _ prepare a light source that illuminates the work area _
OPERATIONS WITH THE POWER CABLE DISCONNECTED FROM ELECTRIC SOURCE:

to begin with, get any spray oil, and spray everything_ the lathe must be washed with brush and petroleum/illuminating oil or whatever you call it, blown with air, then lubricated again_ somewhere there should be a disconnector that allows manual, and NOT motorized, operation of the tool holder carriage_
make sure that the tool holder carriage is disconnected from the motor drive, and can be advanced or retracted by hand, thanks to the handwheel at the opposite end of the motor block_ always disconnected from electricity, try to see if you can advance the tool holder carriage with the handwheel_
you should have a square section key, T-handle, which is used to open or close the jaws of the chuck_ try to insert it in one of the side holes of the chuck and see if the jaws move_ in case open and tighten them until they join them _ look at the jaws with a magnifying glass: they should be numbered 1-2-3_ this will be the order of precedence to reassemble them, once removed completely, which I would not do now, if you don't have help, or someone that can explain better than me_ spray oil_move back and forth, and with compressed air, etc., for now make sure to eliminate any dirt or chips present in the machine, without disassembling it or starting on the motor_ ideally everything should also move manually, including the spindle, which must rotate freely _
I hope that someone less ungrammatical and ignorant than me :) can continue to explain ...
 

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Discussion Starter #39
Never realized there were so many machinists on the forum. No need for youtube, one by one yall can come here and give me lessons!
 

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....beware, I'm not one of Them, no more than when I could be a Welder or a Mechanic ..
and don't forget my nickname :)
 
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