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Hello! This is my first post and I did not see a special place to stop and introduce myself.

I have been a shooter since very young and a few years ago started reloading and bullet casting.

Recently I bought my first Marlin. So recently in fact it will get here tomorrow. All I know at this point is this, it is a model 336 A and Dad says it looks like it has 'regular' or cut rifling. I hope so not that I have had any real experince with 'Microgroove' rifling or an opinion about it. If I understand right if it has cut rifling it was built before 1953?? Which to me lends character and should be easier to shoot cast bullets if what I hear is right about Micro grooves.

I also have need of assistance in repairing an old Model 1889 for a friend.

Looking forward to learning much about Marlins and shooting in general.

Brian
 

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Bman,

Welcome. There are lots of good bros and sisters here and all will help out and share good info.

Dave :D
 

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Feel free to post what you need to fix on that 1889 and there are several who will chip in with information, parts places that carry some of the old parts, and ways to get by when the original parts aren't available.

And welcome aboard.
 

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Welcome. The 336 board is a pretty good one. Not nearly as many egos as the BB board, as this group is very helpful and trade experiences with very little judgement, which is very much to their credit.

Your rifling could be the standard type, which preceded the Microgroove, depending upon when the rifle was made. The current .30-30 and .35 336's are still Microgroove, except for the cowboy versions.

The Microgroove is capable with jacketed bullets, and if its peculiarities are known it very possibly is superior to standard rifling with lead bullets, as long as I get to pick the style of bullet used. The key to microgroove and cast is, very simply, larger bullet diameter and long bearing surface. Bore riders may not work if they don't ride the bore.

Don't bet against a microgroove with lead if your rifle has standard rifling. You may lose your shorts in a shootoff.

The "microgroove won't shoot with cast" is the most persistent and most untrue rumor that floats around in the shooting world. Those that cannot get a microgroove to shoot lead are suffering from a lack of information.
Friend Dave unboxed a new, microgroove 336 .35 Remington, loaded it with the .360-.3605" diameter RCBS cast 200 FN, and proceeded to shoot under 2" groups at 100 yards with open sights (peep) with NO load refinement or tinkering. Doesn't get a lot easier than that, and don't count on standard rifling to do any better.

Marlin .22's have Microgroove rifling, and most shoot lead bullets exclusively. Save for short bearing length hypervelocities, they shoot lead just fine.

So go forth, and repeat "microgroove won't shoot with lead" no more!

You'll enjoy it here. I have, for the last five years or so.
 

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Bman,
Welcome! Marlin introduced Micro-Groove rifling in the 1954 model .22's, but the 336 didn't get it until the 1957 models. So if your gun is 1956, or earlier, it should have cut Ballard style rifling.
Hope this helps!
 

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Nice of you to drop in Bman, hope you become a regular.

You will find all the info you want here, and maybe an opinion or two.

Tell us a little about it when you get it. It is one fine rifle and the A in decent shape is a rare find.

We look forward to hearing more about it.

SS
 
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