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I have never loaded using new brass. Do I treat it the same as using old brass and resize? Looks like I need to flair to accept the bullet. Fun stuff for sure :)
 

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I process new virgin brass as follows: Resize, trim if necessary or to uniform length, debur and bell case mouths. If dealing with bottleneck cases and striving for best accuracy, I will also uniform primer pockets and ream flash holes. I gave up on case neck reaming years ago, as I found no appreciable reduction is group size with factory cut chambers.

Roe
 

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I process new virgin brass as follows: Resize, trim if necessary or to uniform length, debur and bell case mouths. If dealing with bottleneck cases and striving for best accuracy, I will also uniform primer pockets and ream flash holes. I gave up on case neck reaming years ago, as I found no appreciable reduction is group size with factory cut chambers.

Roe
+1 to that.
 
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I full length size new brass,check trim length,and chamfer. I have never uniformed a primer pocket in 41 years of reloading as I'm not a benchrest competitor. Mine go bang just fine. I do hand inspect every piece through every step of the reloading process.

Rob
 
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I look it over pretty good and chamfer the case mouth after I run it through the sizer so as to true up the case mouth. I have never deburred the flash hole but I do take a gander at them just to make sure they look like they are centered.
 

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Didn't know they still sold new brass :biggrin: especially 35 rem's
 

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If you are a fan of Handloader Magazine, and read the comments and opinions of the different authors over a couple decades, the answer is yes, no, maybe.

If you are filling rifle brass, you will get the greatest change on the first shot, and that will be rifle/chamber dependent. Unless the case mouth on rifle brass is out of round, or dented, and the round doesn't need a crimp, I usually just fill and fire away. For serious accuracy use, I use the first cycle to fireform with Trail Boss. That practice brings the brass to chamber dimension with minimal stretch in the area above the web, and seems to increase brass life significantly. If the brass needs a crimp, like the .30-30 and .35 Remington, you need cases of equal length to minimize buckling at the shoulder, and bulges below the neck. As often as possible, I reserve trimming until the brass has been fired.

Handgun brass is slightly different. If you are shooting any kind of lead bullet, crimp is not quite as critical if the loads will be used to practice DA at 7yds. As long as the cases are of reasonably uniform length, and the mouth of the case isn't dented, just flare and fill. With jacketed bullets, the crimp must be must be uniform, and that means the cases must also be uniform length to prevent problems when bullets are seated, trimming is essential. If you are using one of the slower powders like 2400, AA#9, or H110, accuracy takes a quick dive if the crimp is not only uniform, but heavy. Shooting the .357 and .44/.45 in a rifle, even with iron sights, crimp is very significant when it comes to accuracy. It's just as important with a handgun, especially if you are shooting a scoped gun at 50-100yds.

I do not typically bother with primer pockets or flash holes, as brass from Remington, Winchester, and Federal is typically very uniform from a bulk bag. Starline is particularly good. Rifle brass for my lever guns I trim, but they lack the precision to find any difference for any extra work. Even my bolt rifles, all of which have been tuned to shoot MOA or less, the gains in accuracy are below the precision capabilities of "Moi", shooting offhand or sitting with a sling. Or even prone with a rest if my old bones get that low to the ground, (almost never). But I do have a flash hole reamer and cutters. If you look at a bunch of cases and you see burrs, etc. and round holes make you happy, cut away, it won't hurt anything unless you cut the hole too big. I do keep lots of brass together, as there are differences over time that will make a difference with your favorite varmint rifle from a bench.

So, whether you are using new or recycled brass, case prep is a matter of time, tools, and how you will be using the ammo. Accuracy and reliability can be enhanced or derailed by how much effort you apply to the end product.
 
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