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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi, I am new to this forum, but I have been a big fan of Marlin rifles for a very long time. I would like to take this opportunity to let everyone know that I have recently published a book about vintage .22 rifles. The title of the book is "Walnut and Steel: Vintage .22 Rifles". It was published by authorhouse (Self Publishing ? AuthorHouse Book Publishing Company) in Feb. 2014 and is now available from the publisher, also Amazon, Barnes and Noble and Booksamillion. As far as I know it is the only book that specializes in only vintage .22 rifles. I cover rifles from Marlin, Stevens, Savage, Remington, and Winchester, mostly the really popular ones like the M39A and the Winchester Model 61 and 62, but also some that were lesser known. For a lot more information and several pictures, please visit my website: Walnut & Steel - Home. Thanks everyone for your interest!
 

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Welcome to the MarlinOwners Forum from New York, and thanks for the Info.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Hi Everyone, Sorry for the delay in responding, but I'm afraid my computer is on its last legs. I sure appreciate your interest in the book. I have a few copies on hand, so if you'd like an autographed copy, I can send you one for $19.99 + $3.00 shipping (softcover) or $28.99 + 3.50 shipping (hardcover). Amazon and Barnes and Noble both offer it in e-book version for $4.99. Golphin, if you are serious about a review copy, please message me with your address and I'll make sure you get one. Thanks again to all for your interest.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Thanks again to everyone for your interest in the book. So far, it's received several very good reviews (Amazon) and I really appreciate those who have taken their time to do so. Again, if anyone wants a signed copy, please message me.
 

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I like that there is a Kindle version, although I want a hard-copy to peruse thru at any time.
 
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I went ahead and bought the Kindle version, and if it's good enough to be a reference book I'll want a print version too.
 
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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Hi again everyone and thanks for the excellent response to the book. I welcome any and all suggestions, comments, or criticisms about it. So far, all comments received have been very positive, but I'm sure there are things that could be improved. I really wish I could have included some high quality color photos, but that would have at least doubled the price of the book, and I wanted to keep it affordable. I hope to be able to do a Volume II in the not too distant future, and I will be covering another 15 to 20 vintage rifles in it. God bless you all.
 

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Can't wait for the review!! Congratulations on your book! I look forward to owning one!
 

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Hey all, I wanted to put a review up here as soon as I finished WalnutBill22's book, but life got in the way a bit, but better late than never. A word of caution, you may start selling modern stuff to buy old stuff for no apparent reason!

Bill writes as if he is speaking to you and this is a very easy read. I went into the book with an open mind as most vintage 22's that I ran across in my day were not what some would call, the most desirable. By that, I mean that as a younger man, I didn't get to handle all the good old Winchesters, Marlins, Remingtons and Stevens, to name a few, as most seemed to live life in a barn or behind the seat of the pickup. Or, the locals found the cheapest thing that went "bang" at a coupe raiding raccoon and that was plenty good enough. So needless to say, after reading Bill's book, I promptly went out and shot the only old .22 that I have. I shoot mostly modern Marlins, and thought times have changed only the lawyer type stuff on the modern guns, Bill inspired me want some good old blue/wood guns. (The good news is that they are available now, plus I earn my own money)

Anyway, I would highly recommend Bill's book to anyone, be it for a quick jog down memory lane or to dig the old reliable one out of the closet, or learn a little about the stuff that you weren't allowed to touch, the book is an easy good read. I'll also add that Bill answered another email request and we've had several conversations via email since then. I believe him to be a good man, good American and like-viewed person that wrote a good book. Try it, it's worth the trouble.

Sargemarlin
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Thanks Sargemarlin. It's very kind of you to take your time to review and comment on the book. I guess I've always had a particular fondness for .22 rifles, and the older ones just seem to have a lot more character and fascination for me than most of the newer stuff. At any rate, I learned a great deal while doing the research for the book, and I thought it would be good to share it with others with a similar interest. Glad you liked it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
As I said in the book, anyone who messes around with old .22 rifles is often pleasantly surprised by accurate they can be. In the process of researching and writing the book, I tested a good number of them, some going back about a hundred years, and I was very favorably impressed with their accuracy potential. Although nearly all of them were run of the mill sporter weight models, most could easily hold their own against any modern sporter that hasn't been custom tuned, etc. Plus, in nearly every case, they were all much better fit and finished than just about any current production rimfire rifle. Quality control was a high priority, and anything less than top-notch wasn't allowed to leave the factory. It's sad that this philosophy doesn't hold true anymore.
 

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