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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey guys, I’m new to the forum but have been looking through it for a few months my cousin just purchased a new 1895GBL which is beautiful and fun to shoot I checked over his for the front sights and fit and finish are all very nice. I decided I would order the 1895SBL through our local gun shop should be in next week, they are getting in 4 SBLs and have already sold all 4, Factory ammo seems very pricey the cheapest in Canada I have been able to find is $45 for a box, so we are looking into splitting on reloading equipment the only problem I’m having is does reloading actually save money, from what I’ve seen a basic LEE kit is around $250 then the dies, powders, primers bullets and brass are on top of that. is reloading actually cheaper ? And is there anything else I should be aware of with the guns or with reloading. Thanks everyone
 

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It takes a while to break even but eventually you will. Unless you are like me and just continue to buy more and more reloading stuff. In that case you'll never save any money and reloading will become a passion as you strive to eek out the most accuracy from your guns.
 

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If you value your a) eyes, b) hands, c) life or d) all of the above- Buy a Reloading Manual, read it, then read it again, then decide if reloading is for you. A Speer was my first.
 
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Hi Octane, fellow Canuck here and also a recent purchaser of the SBL. Congrats on your new rifle, it is a very nice gun and I hope you enjoy it. As you stated, shooting this gun is not a cheap proposition with factory rounds. I have five different types of ammo on hand, and the cheapest I've found is $52 for 390 gr. hard cast gas-checked rounds from my local gunsmith / reloader. Everything else is over $60 per box. Sometimes well over (Buffalo Bore). One note, the HSM 430 gr. "Bear Loads" will NOT cycle unfired rounds, as the cartridge is too long for the relatively short action of the rifle, and the round will hang up on the front edges of the ejection port. These rounds will feed and chamber okay, so you can shoot them and of course ejecting the spent brass is no problem, but you won't be able to unload unspent rounds through the action very easily. This problem was verified by local gunsmith who informed me that the HSM rounds are not suitable for the Marlin 1895 due to excess length. YMMW, but that is my experience with my rifle. Good luck and safe shooting!
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks for the replies so far, yes i would want to be as safe as possible, I was looking at the LEE manual at the local gun shop. They seem to carry LEE and Hornady reloading equipment, reloading has my interest and seems really cool to learn how to do properly, we don’t really have anyone to teach us so we would be going off reloading manuals and playing it safe. The oparts that I’m really sketched out about is the measuring the powder and making sure the crimp is proper for a lever action.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks for the heads up on the buffalo bore ammo. I’m sure for the first month or so I’ll be shooting factory ammo and saving brass to help ease into reloading, we only hunt deer bear and moose if we can get tags. What are factory ammo loads that are capable for hunting, I’ve read most factory loads are really toned down so older rifles can still shoot them
 

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Thanks for the heads up on the buffalo bore ammo. I’m sure for the first month or so I’ll be shooting factory ammo and saving brass to help ease into reloading, we only hunt deer bear and moose if we can get tags. What are factory ammo loads that are capable for hunting, I’ve read most factory loads are really toned down so older rifles can still shoot them
Sure, no problem. Just to clarify, Buffalo Bore works fine, it's the HSM ammo that seems to be problematic in these rifles (again, my only experience with this problem is with my rifle). Also, even with some factory loads (like the Remington 405 gr.) there's a caution on the box that warns only to use the ammo in modern firearms that can handle the chamber pressures. But, should be a non-issue with a new Marlin.
 

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. . . What are factory ammo loads that are capable for hunting, I’ve read most factory loads are really toned down so older rifles can still shoot them
Acquiring a .45/70 is what got me into reloading, and the same may happen with you. I had no one to give me on-site instruction, but, by using several manuals, proceeding slowly, and getting advice from fellow MO members along the way, I've managed to produce some fine loads (both jacketed and cast), and not blown myself or the rifle up in the process. As for saving money, reloading doesn't if you're only going to shoot 20 rounds a year. However, reloading is more economical and allows for more shooting. There is also pride in developing accurate loads that one uses to successfully fill the freezer.

In the meantime, you questioned if factory loads are capable of taking deer, bear and moose. They certainly are. Not everyone who hunts with a .45/70 is a handloader (even though I am and you may be eventually). If your next hunting season comes before you are reloading, the Marlin action is strong enough to shoot almost all the factory offerings (from Remington "green box" up to the heavy hitters by Corbon, Garrett, Buffalo Bore, etc.) There's lots of factory stuff from which to choose that will take care of deer, bear, or moose.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Well I got a call from the gun shop saying they got my SBL in I’m truly excited to take this out and let some rounds off, my cousin and I both got Bushnell trophy TRS-25 Reddots on our guns they are recoil tested for 375 H&H very small design and should be good enough for hunting in brush and not even 200 yards.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
So with a cheap reloading kit the lee anniversary kit or the lee breech lock challenger kit. I’m assuming the scale would be worth upgrading to a digital one ??
 

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Thanks for the replies so far, yes i would want to be as safe as possible, I was looking at the LEE manual at the local gun shop. They seem to carry LEE and Hornady reloading equipment, reloading has my interest and seems really cool to learn how to do properly, we don’t really have anyone to teach us so we would be going off reloading manuals and playing it safe. The oparts that I’m really sketched out about is the measuring the powder and making sure the crimp is proper for a lever action.
I highly suggest buying several different reloading manuals and ALWAYS check and then double check them all against each other for the round you're reloading BEFORE RELOADING ANY AMMO.

And you'll need a few 'accessories" other than just the reloading machine.

Always start at the lowest powder recomendations and work UP. NEVER start at the max load. What is max load in one 45-70 rifle won't always be the max load in another rifle of same make.

You'll learn why when you read a couple of reloading instructions.

And always remember:

There are OLD reloaders.
There are BOLD reloaders.
There are NO OLD BOLD reloaders
 

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One thing to keep in mind about handloading for 45-70, and any number of guys here will back me up on this...you don't need to squeeze every last fps of velocity out of your ammo. If you can get 1.5 MOA at 1500 fps out of heavy lead loads like Missouri Bullet Company Buffalo #1 405 gr, or Beartooth Bullets Piledrivers (525 gr) or Piledriver, Juniors (425 gr), call it good and get ready to hunt. 405 grains and heavier bullets, even at "only" 1400-1500 fps will kill everything in North America, up to and including big Kodiaks. And really, the difference in ballistic arc at say 1700 fps vs 1400 fps is so minor with those 405+ gr bullets, it just isn't worth it for the recoil or the higher pressures on your gun.

I shoot the MBC bullets for practice, because shipped, they're about 28 cents apiece (come in boxes of 200). BTB bullets are GREAT, but it takes about 5 months from order date to delivery date. They have THAT much business. And the BTB bullets, counting shipping, are going to run you about 60 cents apiece. That's really still quite a good price for the quality you get out of a hardcast lead bullet, and if they had normal lead times, I would probably shoot them more. But you can work up a load with the MBC bullets that's ballistically the same as the BTB and practice a lot, for not a lot of money.

If you think you want to shoot lead, in my estimation, Lyman manuals need to be in your library, probably Lyman #49 and #50.

Another benefit to lower velocity like what I'm talking about...you probably will extend the life of your brass. Don't look at the initial cost of brass, consider the per use cost. If you get 10 firings from each brass, and you paid 70 cents, that works out to 7 cents per firing, plus 2 pennies for a primer, about 15-20 cents for the powder charge, and then whatever you pay for your bullets, you come out to under a dollar per cartridge. That's a good deal, any way you slice it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
So I’ve read that hornady leverevolution ammo has shorter brass I bought some for shooting and maybe deer hunting they are $50 a box and about as cheap as it gets to shoot factory rounds in Canada. Would I have to reload this brass with the hornady bullets again when that time comes ?!
 

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So I’ve read that hornady leverevolution ammo has shorter brass I bought some for shooting and maybe deer hunting they are $50 a box and about as cheap as it gets to shoot factory rounds in Canada. Would I have to reload this brass with the hornady bullets again when that time comes ?!
The Hornady FTX cases are shortened to enable the OAL to remain at 2.550 when the FTX bullet is loaded. My opinion is that it makes sense to keep your shortened brass separate and reload with the Hornady FTX bullets. I am all about safety when it comes to reloading and when you have a reduce capacity case (shortened) that is specifically created for a single bullet (Hornady FTX) you will be best served and safest when you produce reloads that follow the manual for that length brass which means using the FTX bullets. Anything else would take you out of the known reloading data and testing and into an experiment which again in my opinion should be avoided.
 

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So I’ve read that hornady leverevolution ammo has shorter brass I bought some for shooting and maybe deer hunting they are $50 a box and about as cheap as it gets to shoot factory rounds in Canada. Would I have to reload this brass with the hornady bullets again when that time comes ?!
Hornady LR FTX ammo is pretty close to the least expensive 45-70 offering here in the US. I've bought it for $28.00 USD a 20 rd. box, on sale. Normally, in my area hornady FTX is 34.99 I can buy Winchester SuperX 300 gn JHP 45-70 for $34.62 a 20 rd. box from walmart or Academy Sports for $34.99. other brand from $44.00 and up....

At a Dunhams, all of those are 10-15 dollars more per box of 20, so it matter where I shop for ammo. Winchester Super X is 49.99 at Dunhams. Funny thing is all three of these stores (walmart, dunhamd , academy are all visible from the others parking lots in my area. As they're all on the same street. I quit buying at Dicks SGs. But it's just around the corner from the other three here.(you'd think they'd wise up)

I don't know what chain box stores canada has nor it's laws about where ammo can be sold but you might want to look at those large box chain stores that carry ammo.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Unfortunately I haven’t been able to find buffalo bore anywhere around that I have to shop, we have Canadian tire and Walmart for big box stores that sell ammo. Neither had any 45-70 ammo, my local gun shop had Winchester Remington and hornady and I think maybe federal the prices were 50-65ish a box and another gunshop close by has Barnes $73 a box that’s about all I’ve been able to find locally. So I bought the leverevolutions to get shooting my new gun then found out the brass was shorter for when I get into reloading ��
 

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Unfortunately I haven’t been able to find buffalo bore anywhere around that I have to shop, we have Canadian tire and Walmart for big box stores that sell ammo. Neither had any 45-70 ammo, my local gun shop had Winchester Remington and hornady and I think maybe federal the prices were 50-65ish a box and another gunshop close by has Barnes $73 a box that’s about all I’ve been able to find locally. So I bought the leverevolutions to get shooting my new gun then found out the brass was shorter for when I get into reloading ��
Not sure where you're located up here, but Cabela's has carried Buffalo Bore in the past. Hornady brass is short if loaded with the 325gr FTX bullet, if it's the 350gr FP, it should be standard length. You can use the shorter brass for reloading, just slightly less powder capacity, also doesn't crimp in the Lee Factory Crimp die.
 

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Hey guys, I’m new to the forum but have been looking through it for a few months my cousin just purchased a new 1895GBL which is beautiful and fun to shoot I checked over his for the front sights and fit and finish are all very nice. I decided I would order the 1895SBL through our local gun shop should be in next week, they are getting in 4 SBLs and have already sold all 4, Factory ammo seems very pricey the cheapest in Canada I have been able to find is $45 for a box, so we are looking into splitting on reloading equipment the only problem I’m having is does reloading actually save money, from what I’ve seen a basic LEE kit is around $250 then the dies, powders, primers bullets and brass are on top of that. is reloading actually cheaper ? And is there anything else I should be aware of with the guns or with reloading. Thanks everyone
If you're going to reload just as a means to get cheap ammo and you're the type who shoots a couple of shots a year to line up your gun and 1 or 2 more to to kill your deer and your gun is in a generic caliber like 30-30 Win, 308 Win, 30-06 Sprng, 45-70 Gvt then don't bother. Lots of good factory ammo available for these calibers. You would never recoup the $500 spent on reloading stuff in savings over ammo off the shelf.

If you feel you would enjoy the shooting hobby and might go to the range and fire a couple of dozen or more rounds on the weekend and like to work with your hands and tinker with stuff then reloading might be for you.

If you get into serious competitive pistol or shotgun shooting unless you're Warren Buffett reloading will just about be a financial necessity. You'll fire hundreds of rounds a week.
 
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