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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Greetings gentlemen!

Long time listener, first time caller here on the site.

I have here a brand new 1895 CBA shorty cowboy from my local corporate firearms buying facility. I purchased it based on feedback that the cowboys are a cut above the usual Remlin schlock and those advisories proved true.

That said, it needed some help, just like any rifle made after the Reagan administration (or FDR administration, more accurately, as I am a lover of fine blued steel and walnut).

Being a lazy man, I only took it down to a field strip situation and went to work according to the directions found here and elsewhere with 1200 grit wet/dry and a few fine stones to polish and smooth out the hard edges of our post industrial reality.

After spending an afternoon trying my best to make the action look and feel more akin to my prewar model 39 I set about to breaking the edges of the lever, trigger, hammer et al. and found the project to be a worthwhile labor, though in need of more work later when I could devote the time and headspace to dig deeper into guts of the machine.

Finding fault with the contrast between the polished barrel and the off the rack 336 reciever I decided to lightly touch it with the wet dry as well as taking the edge off the grain of the stock with the same abrasive. At some point this winter I will devote the weeks required to peel the marshield off the wood and perhaps even brown the receiver but, for now, I was content to Johnson paste wax the whole thing and call it good. Overall it feel good for a gun not made in the glorydays of American firearms craftsmanship.

This is to be my "subaru gun" as it is the closest to a truck I could manage and it dissapears well behind the cargo rubber in the back, wrapoed lovingly in old woolen hiking socks for protection.

Initial loads by way of a lee loader and a hammer are 405 cast from my neighbor, Maplewood bullets, over 2400 in Starline cases at around 1300 fps. They shoot to the sights and cut fearful large holes in the target.

If anyone is interested I am happy to expand on my journey as I go if you're contemplating a Remlin 1895 CBA with the 18.5" barrel.

Don't let your boits get too close to the fire.
 

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Welcome to Marlin Owners from the Sierra Foothills. I enjoyed your post.

Jack
 

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Welcome from South Florida!
 

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Welcome from SW Arkansas. Like your writing style and your choice in caliber.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Thanks for the warm welcomes gentlemen!

I would certainly be all ears to any tips or tricks you have for improving the overall package of a 1895.

I'm planning on adding a peep sight (dang eyes!) and sanding the proud wood around the tang and bottom metal flush.

Any suggestions for recoil pads that don't completely ruin the cowboy aesthetics? I have contemplated a slip on rubber one for the range but I'd prefer not to.

Thanks again for all the warm regards!
 

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I have a new manufacture 1895CB (except 26" barrel) also. I noticed the same issue on your photo as I had on both of my CB's (1894 and 1895). The magazine tube does not match the barrel in appearance. The barrel finish from the factory is 320 to 400 grit (I was told by Remington) and is final sanded along the length of the barrel (sanded in the direction from muzzle to chamber). My 1895cb barrel appeared closer to 600 grit and my 1894cb barrel seemed closer to 320 grit. The magazine tube seems to be 220 grit (wild guess) but most importantly is final sanded along the radius of the tube. In other words it is perpendicular to the barrel sanding. From my research, the original JM's were sanded in the same direction for both the barrel and tube (lengthwise), which made them a match in appearance.

My solution was to sand the magazine tubes until I ended up with 600 grit going lengthwise on the tube. I used a hardwood backer, cut with a radius to match the barrel diameter. To get a similar radius, I clamped two, 2.5 by 4 inch pieces of wood together and drilled a hole in the middle, where they joined, roughly the size of the magazine tube. Any size wood blocks work just fine and the hole should be sloppy to comfortably fit the sand paper. Plus I only used one of the blocks (half of the hole), not both. I used cutting fluid (oil) on the wet/dry paper. As you may already know, always use a sanding backer.

My final process was to then polish with a cotton / linen 4" buffing wheel (Harbor Freight) in my drill press at the highest speed it would go with Brownell's "green" polishing grit, which is a medium polish grit. I polished in a lengthwise direction. Beware that everything within about a 4 foot radius of your drill press will turn green so clear the area. Also wear protective clothing, mask and eye wear. (I didn't at first and my face felt like l was in a sandstorm). I then sent them out for hot bluing (cold blue won't get it done) along with a bunch of other parts from guns I'm working on. Made a huge difference in the appearance. It was really worth the effort and total time was about an hour for each tube. Hot bluing was $100 plus shipping but like I said I had a small pile of parts also. I know I should post photos but shinny metal on shinny metal doesn't photograph all that well. But maybe I will try later when off of work.
John
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
I have a new manufacture 1895CB (except 26" barrel) also. I noticed the same issue on your photo as I had on both of my CB's (1894 and 1895). The magazine tube does not match the barrel in appearance. The barrel finish from the factory is 320 to 400 grit (I was told by Remington) and is final sanded along the length of the barrel (sanded in the direction from muzzle to chamber). My 1895cb barrel appeared closer to 600 grit and my 1894cb barrel seemed closer to 320 grit. The magazine tube seems to be 220 grit (wild guess) but most importantly is final sanded along the radius of the tube. In other words it is perpendicular to the barrel sanding. From my research, the original JM's were sanded in the same direction for both the barrel and tube (lengthwise), which made them a match in appearance.

My solution was to sand the magazine tubes until I ended up with 600 grit going lengthwise on the tube. I used a hardwood backer, cut with a radius to match the barrel diameter. To get a similar radius, I clamped two, 2.5 by 4 inch pieces of wood together and drilled a hole in the middle, where they joined, roughly the size of the magazine tube. Any size wood blocks work just fine and the hole should be sloppy to comfortably fit the sand paper. Plus I only used one of the blocks (half of the hole), not both. I used cutting fluid (oil) on the wet/dry paper. As you may already know, always use a sanding backer.

My final process was to then polish with a cotton / linen 4" buffing wheel (Harbor Freight) in my drill press at the highest speed it would go with Brownell's "green" polishing grit, which is a medium polish grit. I polished in a lengthwise direction. Beware that everything within about a 4 foot radius of your drill press will turn green so clear the area. Also wear protective clothing, mask and eye wear. (I didn't at first and my face felt like l was in a sandstorm). I then sent them out for hot bluing (cold blue won't get it done) along with a bunch of other parts from guns I'm working on. Made a huge difference in the appearance. It was really worth the effort and total time was about an hour for each tube. Hot bluing was $100 plus shipping but like I said I had a small pile of parts also. I know I should post photos but shinny metal on shinny metal doesn't photograph all that well. But maybe I will try later when off of work.
John
This is EXCELLENT information. Many thanks for your advice and experience!

Where by chance did you send the parts off for rebluing?
 
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