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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Just got my new NEF 223. Notice Under no circumstances is 5.56mm NATO ammuntion to be used in this rifle. What is the difference? I have two boxes of made in Russia 5.56x45 223 rem. Guess i'm not going to use them. But what would be the difference in these and the box of Remmingtons that I have both are 55gr. :? THANKS
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
thanks 10ga. I'll try greybeards tomorrow. Maybe someone here knows. Check back tomorrow. :oops: :?
 

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If I remember right… for one thing the NATO ammunition has a slightly different case with a coating that will stick in the chamber. They also have a bullet that is too heavy for the twist in an H&R/NEF .223 and will keyhole. Others will set me straight if I remembered wrong.

jeff223 will know for sure.
 

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www.ammo-oracle.com

Here's the deal, 5.56mm NATO spec ammo is loaded hotter than civilian .223 Rem is. In a tight chamber is can cause a Kaboom and have rather nasty side effects. IIRC there is also a difference in the throat area of the chambers. Rifles with chambers marked "5.56 NATO" can safely shoot either Surplus Military ammo or commercially available .223 Rem.



FYI the opposite is true with 7.62 NATO ammo. 5.56 WILL be loaded hottter than .223, 7.62 MAY be loaded close to what is available as .308 WIN.


HTH
 

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Thank you SquirrelSniper... I thought I wasn’t remembering it quite right.

.223 chambers have a much shorter throat, a smaller diameter bullet seat and less freebore than the military chamber.

It's the steel .223 case (from Russia I think) that has the coating that will stick so stay away from that too.
 

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Major said:
Thank you SquirrelSniper... I thought I wasn’t remembering it quite right.

.223 chambers have a much shorter throat, a smaller diameter bullet seat and less freebore than the military chamber.

It's the steel .223 case (from Russia I think) that has the coating that will stick so stay away from that too.
You're thinking of Wolf ammo. They used to have laquere coated steel cased ammo, but they now have a polymer coating available. It's good cheap plinking ammo but it can be a PITA when high volume "plinking" in such rifles as Mini 14's, mini 30's and AR15s with tight specs. It really isn't a problem with the commie weapons as their looser tolerances are better able to cope with grit, grime, and other foriegn matter in the works. THe old stuff is okay too, it just requires a little more cleaning.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks for clearing things up for me. The Russians do have an O.D. colored coating. Side by side comparision the Russian is a little taller than the Remmington. Thanks again. :)
 

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Major I had a problem with the .223 wolf ammo after about 30 rounds unable to eject had to use the cleaning rod to remove the round. Glad I only have a few boxes of 20 rounds remaining. Is this a problem with the only with the H & R. As I have seen people at the range with semi auto ar15 and they crank the wolf ammo right thru.
 

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I once had the H&R ultra varmint in 223 and i had fired aboout 7 different types of Military surplus ammo of the 7 all but 1 had problems with ejection . I beleive this is do to higher then SAAMI pressures. I never had those problems with factory ammo in that rifle. I did however have the same problem with hot handloads.
 
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