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Discussion Starter #1
My 1974 336 in 30-30 Winchester has the original iron sights installed. The front is the "hooded version with the vertical "i" post inside and the rear is the adjustable ramp style. I find that over 75 yards out the front post is so large that it literally covers up a 6" diameter area and I would like to get proficient at 100 yards. At 100 yards the sight appears to cover up such a large area downfield I don't see how I can aim with any accuracy. There are a lot of sights on the market so I thought I'd ask the combined knowledge of the forum what exact brand of iron sights you might recommend to help me with this problem. The front sight is now attached with 2 screws and the rear sight is a dove tail fit. Thanks...
 

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Look into peep sights.... several options from Skinner, Williams, Lyman, Marbles, XS, and others. I use a Williams WGRS w/Firesight front post on my 336.
 

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Second the Williams peep w/ the fire sight
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I have looked at many of the sights recommended and most look like the front post is just as thick as the one on my 336 is now but from pictures it's hard to tell. I read last week that some position the top of the front sight at the 6 o'clock position to the target rather than "covering" it up. I learned as a child to cover the target so maybe a switch to the 6 o'clock postion would be better. How do others use the regular front sight on targets over 75 yards? Thanks...
 

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UtopiaTx336 said:
I have looked at many of the sights recommended and most look like the front post is just as thick as the one on my 336 is now but from pictures it's hard to tell. I read last week that some position the top of the front sight at the 6 o'clock position to the target rather than "covering" it up. I learned as a child to cover the target so maybe a switch to the 6 o'clock postion would be better. How do others use the regular front sight on targets over 75 yards? Thanks...
I think(?) Marbles makes a thin front post. If it's a straight post without the bead, I put the POI on top of the post.
 

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Utopia,

There is no option for the condition you describe. The only possible fix would be to file a skinner front sight into a point. Remember to
let the desired impact point sit above that point.
 

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I use Skinner sights and have them made thinner than normal. I shoot POI at the top of the post. Nice thing about a post, you can amend it as you would like. Peeps and posts go well together.

Papalote
 

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UtopiaTX336,

Have you shot from a bench reast at 100 yds. to find what size groups you are shooting?
Yeah, the sight bead will cover up a lot at that range, but you might be supprised at how small your groups could be.

I've found for hunting deer & hog, a bead sight does well for quick target acquisition, using it as you described, (were tought) POA=POI out to 75 yds... but when shooting further, I "take a fine bead" (just barely can see the top of the sight) with a 6 o'clock hold.

Most folks like peep sights or ghost rings, and I do to, but for hunting in low-light conditions, I don't see the front post or bead nearly as good as I do with open sights.

The Williams Firesight would do well, especially in the twilight.
 

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Remove the shiny bead and file the round part flat, it will be a lot thinner.
 

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I like using a Williams FP rear sight with a partridge-style front sight from Skinner. Using a 6 o'clock hold (with the top of the front sight held at the very bottom of the center circle of the target) works plenty well at 100 yards. I'm finding the the Williams peep sight has reduced the size of my groups from what they were when I was using the factory rear sight.
 

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My eyes aren't as good as they used to be, but I still like to shoot iron sights for fun.

Here's how I set up my sight picture with the stock buckhorn sights: I put the front bead in the small notch on the rear semi buckhorn sight. Then, I put my "target" at the top of the bead. I visualize the bullet hitting at the top of the front bead. Focus on the front sight, of course.

Aperture sights with bead: I center the bead in the rear aperture, and center the bead on my desired target. A typical 1/16" bead will cover ABOUT an 8" circle at 100 yards. Since the "kill zone" on a deer is about that size, I simply center the bead on the "kill zone" and pow DRT. If you think about it, that's really good logic and allows for pretty fast targeting. For TARGET shooting, I will center the bead on the target. Using this approach, I can get surprisingly small groups. (Example: I shot a 50 yard 1/4" group with my .22 lever gun with this setup from a bench rest.)

Aperture sights with partridge (sqared off top) front post: I center the top of the post in the rear aperture and sight in so the bullet hits at the top of the post. I do this on my rifles that will be used for smaller targets like squirrels where a bead would cover them up completely. This is probably my favorite setup with aperture sights.

Of the aperture sights, the Skinner is the most durable and best looking. The Williams FP is more easily adjustable with it's click adjustments. I prefer the FP because I often play around with ammo. In any case, you will often need a taller front sight. They are pretty easy to install. If you look, the actual post is dovetailed into the front ramp and can be easily removed with a small hammer and brass punch. Be very careful to keep the ramp supported to avoid shearing off the screws if you hit it too hard. A gun shop could probably do this for you for little to no cost.

If you want a post front sight, get with Skinner. If you want a bead front sight, get with Marbles.
 

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Moon Unit said:
What requires a higher front sight, the Williams WGRS or Williams FP...or are they the same?
It depends on the rifle...
 

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Marble's tang peep works for me and I have a weak shooting eye. Amazing how the diopter effect of the peep clears up the front sight and target.
 

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Replace the front with a Lyman globe and use the crosshair insert, if that covers too much, put a scope on it. 8)
 
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