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I ordered some wood furniture for my pump. What grit sandpaper would you recommend to take the old finish off?. I want to do an oil finish with BLO. I
 

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I ordered some wood furniture for my pump. What grit sandpaper would you recommend to take the old finish off?. I want to do an oil finish with BLO. I
erik,

I suggest starting with a finish remover, something along the lines of Klean Strip. If there are dents or scratches, do no try to sand out. Use a thick damp cloth, old wash cloth, and iron to steam the dents. Steam will swell the dents and scratches before you sand flat.

A 220 grit is more grit than you need to take off any finish not removed by the chemical remover. Use lightly to just strip old finish.

Next a pass with 320 grit and then 400 grit for a slick finish before adding finish oil. Wet/Dry paper.

My preferred finish is DemBart Oil, see Brownell's. One small jar is more than you need to finish one stock. It has two superior qualities. First, it is a penetrating oil that will fill the wood pores and harden the surface. Second, you can continue with additional coats of DemBart Oil to produce a high quality satin finish because it contains some varnish.

The first several coats should be applied more liberally using the 400 grit wet/dry paper creating a slurry to fill the pores wiping off excess before letting dry. Until all pours are filled, between coats use a light sanding with 400 grit to ensure a even surface.

For the remaining coats of DemBart, apply with hands, not cloth, wiping off excess with the heal of your thumb/palm to smooth. Less oil and more coats is best to control excessive build up and streaks. If you want high gloss, the spray Tru-Oil in many thin coats works great.

Lastly, be sure to seal the tang area, under the butt plate, and barrel channel.

Here is want an all DemBart Oil finish looks like. It is water proof and if needed you can apply paste wax for a tack feel when it gets wet.

Gun Rifle Trigger Shooting sport Air gun
 

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I agree with everything Herrschultz has stated above. His process is exactly like mine, just with different products.

I use the Citristrip brand stripper. I may also use a plastic putty knife to help with removal. Walmart usually has some for 50 cents.

The steam process, when applied with patience, can work miracles on dings and dents. Be aware, gouges and scratches that have removed material cannot be made to swell back into place. It will take some sanding to feather out those types of damage.

I use Tru-Oil which I believe is a BLO with additives to make it cure faster and little bit of color. The recommendation to sand with 400 to create the slurry on the first few coats is spot on. It makes for a super smooth finish. Whichever oil you choose, I have found it is best to let it cure completely between applications. Depending on your climate, this can take days (which is why I use the Tru-Oil to speed up the process a little).
 
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I agree with the above post ^^

I've used citristrip with success. 320-400 grit sandpaper will give you a smooth finish. I have even switched to 800 grit for a final sand.

Be sure it's dry before applying another coat of oil. The wood color will slightly darken with additional coats of oil/finish.
 

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i am not one for using strippers to clean the wood. Use sandpaper of various grits to remove and perfect the wood before refinish. Prepping the wood and ensuring it is smooth is the key. finish will come off sanding unless it has been painted by bubba. Anyway lots of opinions you will find, but my advice is wood prep and making sure that is the way you want it before applying your coatings. I also prefer using true oil it has always produced excellent results and durable.
 

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Depending on what finish is on it, I'd chemical strip as well. Plastic finishes can be a bear even with chemicals. Some people tend to bugger up some lines trying to sand off tough finishes.

I also really like Tru-oil. I've tried other things, but always come back to it. BLO can certainly make a gorgeous finish, but it tends to darken a bit much for my liking and doesn't offer much protection.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
So I tried a piece of 220 grit on a spot and not only did the clear coat come right off but so did the stain. I bought the stock and forarm off numrich and they were I assume old stock.
 

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Herrschultz got it right. Chemical strip. Let her get bone dry, go after it with sandpaper and don't forget to steam out any dents. If you have never done it before you will be pleased at how easy it is. I use sandpaper backed with a metal plate around butt plate to be sure nothing is rounded off. My favorite finish is Lin-Speed oil. Goes into the wood an does not lay on top. Lots of coats. Gives a luster and not a cheap shine. Have a good time.
 
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