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Discussion Starter #1
Never fired still in the boxes. A guys bringing em over to my soon to be brother in laws. Needs Money before the Baby arrives this coming week. Blue steel goverment mods with con SNs.
Ill be gone till Sunday. Thanks guys. Gunrunner,,
 

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70 series? or earlier? Makes quite a A diference.
 

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Well there over here now. Ill check. Price tags on both have 1200 dollars. They have linyard loops. Ill be back with info in a min.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
There 1911A1 WW2 reproduction colts. parkerized finish. Sorry for the bad pics. The lights bad.
 

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Hey gunrunner, don't try and blame the light on those pictures, I just think you're so nervous bein in front of those that your hand is shakin. ;D Very nice from what I can tell! What condition are they in?
 

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Discussion Starter #7
New in box. You could be right marlinluvr ;D, But its because I was tryin to get some info before I left. Was in a hurry. They are laying on Debs bed. We have em till monday.Ive owned a gold cup years ago. Dads got a combat commander now. Ive always liked the 1911. Liked my gold cup 2 to 1 over a hi power I had. Fixin to leave out. Ill be back sunday.Randy,,
 

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It'd be a shame to separate those. I've been oogling those WW2 repros for a good while, now. I usually see 'em tagged for around 1000 or so around here, sometimes more, if I'm remembering right. I keep wondering if it'd be wrong to buy one of those someday and then install an ambidextrous safety. I have a real love-hate relationship with my 1911, and part of that reason is the right handed safety, and me being left handed. I have it all disassembled and a new ambi safety half way installed, need to finish that at some point.

They're a very nice pistol, anyway.
 

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Also depends what you're wanting to do with them. To have a Colt, to have a G.I. to play with, or as a build-up gun.

Many of the 1911 manufacturers have a G.I. model like those. Usually at below-$500 though if you're looking to build them up.

The G.I. models all have the G.I. sights. If you want to change out the sights, it's going to the gunsmith to be milled out first. Any other changes are pretty straightfoward.

If you're just shopping for a 1911, for the price of one of those you can get a very nice Springfield Loaded. If you pick up the pair of G.I.'s, you can go after a Dan Wesson, Ed Brown, or Nighthawk 1911.

If you're after them to have an actual COLT branded 1911 G.I., power to you. I will point out that the repro's are priced at about what an ACTUAL WW2 vintage 1911 goes for. Assuming you could find one in the condition you wanted of course.
 

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I think thren is on point here..........The price is a bit high to me too. They ARE COLT, but they ARE current production repro's.

For $1200.00, you can buy a really nice 1911 with better sights and finish..........But it's really about "What you want".................

for $2400.00 for the pair, you 'll have two repro's with consecutive S/N's ..............is that worth $2400.00 to you ?

If they were original issue, I'd feel different about one of both for their listed prices...........but then they'd be collector items, not shooters, and I'd not be interested.........I like to shoot my 1911's, particularly if I've got a lot of money tied up in them.

Tom
 

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If your description is correct, those are the WWII A1 repros, as opposed to the VERY limited 1911 WWI repro (not -A1 version) that had that beautiful charcoal blue. Were you to buy those I wouldn't modify them at all, just shoot them (or just one) and be happy with them.

I suspect they are Series 70's, but don't quote me on that.

One of the gun stores in town had one, I think it was listed for around $1000, but they are not the cheapest in town.
 

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Thren68 said:
If you're just shopping for a 1911, for the price of one of those you can get a very nice Springfield Loaded. If you pick up the pair of G.I.'s, you can go after a Dan Wesson, Ed Brown, or Nighthawk 1911.
The things that distinguish this Colt is more than just the name. They really aren't unreasonably priced at all. IMO spending that much for a South American (Springfield = Brazilian) 1911 is too much. With the Colt you get everything forged. The Springfield has a cast frame, and MIM small parts. Not that there's anything necessarily wrong with that. But there is a difference. The Colt is old school American quality.

If it were me I wanted a shooter that I could carry, I'm with you guys, I'd get something else preferably first (GI sights are tiny, and modding one of these heavily seems like a waste)...I'd think if you wanted to go that route you'd be a lot better off just getting a Colt 1991 and modding it. The 1991 is a series 80, but is a good bit more modernized, and cheaper than these repros (~$700-800 NIB). You'd have less mods to do, and it'd cost you less to start with. And it's still made in the USA in the same plant in New Haven.

I'd stay away from the Dan Wessons. They raised the price by over 50% recently, and I don't see that they're anywhere near worth the new price. Mine came with a loose fitting barrel bushing, and I'm thinking I'm going to have to have the chamber reamed on mine to get an acceptable level of reliability. In IDPA I tend to get 1-2 jams per match (which is usually around 50-60 rounds total), regardless if I use factory ammo or my reloads from virgin brass, which is obviously an unacceptable level of reliability. I keep my pistols very clean, too, and properly lubed, and have tried every lube with this pistol. FP-10 works best, but it still jams. The last time I shot it in IDPA, at the very end of my last stage I had to clear the chamber and show safe. The round wouldn't eject at all, the slide totally locked up! Two of us tried with a good bit of force to get the live round to eject, but it was stuck. Granted this was cheap factory ammo, but that's just unacceptable. I know I just need to take it to a good pistol smith and have it worked over. But spending this much on a pistol (bought it a few years ago when they were under a grand, too), turning around and having to spend another five hundred dollars to make it reliable and what it should have been in the first place just irks me. I've been a lot happier with my recently acquired H&K P30. Not a single jam or issue so far (I've already put 1000 rounds or so through it), and I shoot it a lot more accurately, even slow fire.

I don't have an experience with Ed Browns, but Nighthawks sure are very, very nice.

If you're after them to have an actual COLT branded 1911 G.I., power to you. I will point out that the repro's are priced at about what an ACTUAL WW2 vintage 1911 goes for. Assuming you could find one in the condition you wanted of course.
For one in near-new condition you're going to pay a lot more than $1000.
 

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Well, my numbers are 2 years old. But at that time WW2 Colt 1911A1's were around 1000-1200. Remington Rands were around 1600.

As to brand, I just used Springfield as an example. You can get Kimbers, Para's, and several others in the same ballpark price.

Sorry to hear about your Dan Wesson. Mine is a clock. I've heard and seen next to no complaints about them. The price jump was needed because the previous pricing was WAY LOW for the components and tooling used in them. There are several reviews where the D.W. was run against 1911's almost twice it's (old) price and held it's own nicely. One of the best LEO 1911 gunsmiths I've worked with strongly recommends the D.W.'s and Springfields.
 

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I'm not knocking Springfields, they seem to be pretty good. My buddy had a Springfield and after fussing with the extractor a little and feed ramp a little it was 100% and quite the nice shooter. I'm just saying dollar for dollar I wouldn't buy one when I could buy a US made Colt. I thought the Springfield Inc. 1911s were cheaper than the Colts and such, hence their popularity, but I hadn't checked in a while and assume they'd gone up like the DWs. On the other hand I haven't had the best luck with my US made 1911 so maybe I'm off base and the new foreign MIM pistols are where it's at. But my dad's last .45 was a Colt made in the early '90s and it was 100%, I really, really liked that pistol. He has a Nighthawk now and it's super nice, the best 1911 I've ever handled.

So the number of pistols I'm reporting on is very small here, but I figure it wouldn't hurt to relate my experiences. I haven't had any problems with parts breaking or anything on the DW, it's just fitment issues. I'm convinced that the barrel bushing would eventually hammer itself to death, but it's held up for 5000 rounds so far and hasn't been a detriment to accuracy. I have a new barrel bushing for it that fits a lot better, and the chamber reaming shouldn't be too expensive, I hope. Maybe I can see if DW will do it for me. I'll eventually get it working reliably if I have to have it totally rebuilt by a top notch gunsmith. I was just saying that you do get something in a Colt at that price point that you really don't get from any other manufacturer aside from the old Dan Wessons (like Colts they are at least almost all forged, except for the hammer IIRC). They are not overpriced.

I'm sure part of the reason that I get pretty irritated at this DW is that I really wanted a Colt to start with, but couldn't find one locally so settled for the DW because it was on the shelf, fit my objective criteria, was about the same price, and looked really nice. And when this one didn't live up to build quality of my dad's Colt...it's irritating. Oh well, I'll get a Colt some day.
 

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Before we get too bubbly about the quality of Colt firearms, let's keep in mind that is was the very lack of quality that opened the door for companies like Kimber, Springfield, DW, and all the rest of the current producers of 1911 pistols, not to mention instumental in providing the diapers, braces, and college funds for the kids of a plethora of pistolsmiths.

These 1911A1 WWII Reproductions were not designed or marketed as a base gun for customizing, or as an inexpensive entry level 1911. Colt intended these to be limited production "collector" pieces, just as they have done with the 1911 WWI Reproduction, and are now doing with the 1911-2011 Anniversary release. Purchasing any of these pistols at the premium they command as a base for customization would be the height of foolishness, as there are plenty of basic 1911s available at a much lower price for that purpose...even from Colt, if you must have the rampant pony on the side.

That then, leaves only two possible purposes for their existance. As an alternative for those who want to shoot an "authentic" 1911A1 without putting wear on a real veteran of WWII...or as an investment in a future collectors item. The first has merit, especially as the price of those true WWII era 1911's continue to escalate. The second is pure speculation at this time.

Their worth then becomes what someone is willing to pay to shoot a reproduction or lock it away in the safe as an investment. If the desire is to speculate, I suggest the purchase of a real veteran of WWII would pay far greater dividends in much less time.

Finally, before any decision is made, this review may offer additional insight...
http://www.sightm1911.com/lib/review/colt_repro.htm

Roe
 

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Barenjager said:
Before we get too bubbly about the quality of Colt firearms, let's keep in mind that is was the very lack of quality that opened the door for companies like Kimber, Springfield, DW, and all the rest of the current producers of 1911 pistols, not to mention instumental in providing the diapers, braces, and college funds for the kids of a plethora of pistolsmiths.
Right. I was assuming new production, or at least no earlier than a 90's model like my dad's was. I've heard good things about Colt since they've been making those changes, new management, etc. They're not building under the blue dome anymore, they're in a thoroughly modern facility, now. They made a number of changes in the way they made the 1991, etc., and were even building them a little looser to ensure reliability. I always thought their decline from market monopoly into relative obscurity was primarily about their stodgy slowness/unwillingness to offer custom options from the factory, such as Kimber and Springfield offered, combined with the low cost of the foreign pistols and such. But it'd make sense if there was more to it than just that. I'm sure even todays Colts are built to a price, and not an Army Ordnance Dept. standard as the original GI M1911 pistols were.

I guess it's pretty impossible to say, anyway, what's good vs. what's not as far as overall reliability of manufacture goes, especially when one is only looking at a couple examples when hundreds of thousands or millions are made. It's probably like Consumer Reports where even if I had the numbers in front of me of statistical failure rates and such, it might not be very conclusive, anyway. It's just things I see like "match chambers" and excessively tight slide rails on what you want to be a combat/carry reliable pistol, and I start to get pretty skeptical. John Browning didn't design the 1911 for that tight of tolerances. And the 1911 didn't earn its reputation for to hell and back reliability with those tight of tolerances. Errors in design philosophy like that can become systematic for sure. Buy whatever works for you, but personally I won't be buying another 1911 for my (carry/defense) purposes unless it's a Colt, original USGI, or something with similarly, deliberately loose tolerances (I hear the Philippine made Rock Island Armory pistols are also good in this regard). Obviously that's not all there is to the equation of what makes a 1911 run right, but ignoring it, particularly with cost-limited pistols as most of us buy where manufacturers have only so much time/money they can put into the pistol before they have to shove it out the door and hope it's good enough, and wasting that time making slides and rails and chambers "tight" in order to make marginal gains in accuracy in trade for a very real negative impact on mean reliability seems to be going in the wrong direction for my purposes.
 

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Ryan I can see your point my friend. I was once lucky enough to handle and closely inspect a 1914 vintage Colt 1911 not built for the military and it was beautiful indeed. The gun I inspected had been owned by a California border patrol officer during those years and had seen a lot of use. I fully understand the interest in these fine guns and yes I would still love to own that old Colt....grin. My Kimbers will do just fine for me though and I have no complaints about them.

Jesse
 

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Barenjager said:
Finally, before any decision is made, this review may offer additional insight...
http://www.sightm1911.com/lib/review/colt_repro.htm
Roe
Well ouchie. Thanks for the link Roe. If it's an accurate review (and it seems to be) it would certainly turn off any thought of that model for me.

I've known for a while that Colt was making money more on their name, but that seems beyond excessive.
 

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Barenjager said:
Before we get too bubbly about the quality of Colt firearms, let's keep in mind that is was the very lack of quality that opened the door for companies like Kimber, Springfield, DW, and all the rest of the current producers of 1911 pistols, not to mention instumental in providing the diapers, braces, and college funds for the kids of a plethora of pistolsmiths.
That's where I was headed... my original 1911 was a 1980's era Colt and, while beautiful to look at, was a piece of junk (very sloppy slide to frame fit which contributed to mediocre accuracy and a split barrel bushing. My '80's era Colt Gov't .380 has the same characteristics, but serves it's purpose as a defensive weapon.) Next was a Springfield... while built better it and I never really got along, it just didn't fit me and I could never get to 100% functioning. My brother still has the Springer, but it still needs some work.

I have an earlier Kimber and, as I joke, our honeymoon still continues. Maybe I got lucky (3rd time's the charm...) or maybe the earlier pistols are better, I don't know, but it's All There.

Not to stray too far off the OP reservation... Roe explained it better than me, these 1911's would be collectors (shooters or safe queens) and not the first choice for a carry or working pistol, etc.
 

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Here they would go for 1K for both as set most likely..
 
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