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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm new to this forum and a new Marlin owner. I just purchased my first Marlin, a used 336 in 30-30 S#34XXX. This gun appears to be pre microgroove and does not have factory tapped mounting screws on top of the receiver. The riflings look to be in good condition. What kind of accuracy can I expect with jacketed bullets? With cast bullets? Any ifo would be appricated. Thank you. AP
 

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AP,

Are you sure of the serial number? If it is pre microgroove the serial number should begin with a G,H,J,K or L.

Does it have a descriptive lettering along side the "336" such as A, SC, RC?

SS
 

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Hello, Ayms, and welcome to the forum!

Is that an S model or an S in the serial number?

All guns are not the same, and therefore there and no cut and dried comments I can give you regarding accuracy. I just purchased a 51 35REM lever action Marlin that does real well with both cast and jacketed. It is not drilled and tapped for a scope, and so I mounted a Williams receiver sight on it. I was able to get a one inch group at 50 yards with jacketed, and the same with wheel weights.

The jackted around does fine with the higher velocities, while the lead does a bit better around 2000fps.

My 30-30 of modern manufacture does fine with both lead and jacketed and wears a scope. The one I am referring to is a 336SS, and has microgroove rifleing. It has not been firelapped, and I believe the best group I had last year for the postal match was .8 in. at 100 yards. It heats up quickly, and must be shot very slowly.
If you want to fire the lead accurately, many of us have found that the firelapping procedure evens out the barrel's imperfections.

Your mileage may vary. I also have a 30-30CB that is the most accurate rifle I have.
 

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Dr. A,

I believe AP was describing the serial number with the "S". If the serial number begins with "S" then indeed, the rifle was made in 1959.

SS
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Sorry Guys, I only got two things wrong on my first post, The model and the serial number. But then that was the only two things I put in the post. It should read 336RC serial number H34XXX.

AP
 

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You have a really nice rifle. As Sure-shot posted it was made in 1951, and the "RC" nomenclature means "Regular Carbine".

Shoot it and have fun but otherwise, I would not change anything about this rifle, not that it is extremely valuable but you can purchase a used one of modern ventage for $250 or so. and it will be drilled and tapped for a scope and may even have checkering on the stock and forearm.

Hope to hear from you often,

SS
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Thank you Sidespin. I wondered what the RC stood for. I bought it to shoot. The blueing is worn and there is not much finish on the wood. It looks like it could tell some stories if it could talk.( It really youall's fault I keep reading how good these Marlins,sooo had to get one.) Anyway will about $175 -$180 by the time I get it back here to southern Kalifornia. It hit 115 degrees today so it might be a little while before it goes to the range. Thanks for the info.

AP
 

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Glad to help, hope you become a regular on the board.

Be sure and give that RC a thorough cleaning before you shoot it. I bought one about half the age of yours a few years ago and it was absolutely filthy.

If you need help taking it apart and putting back together just come to this board, you will get plenty of good advise.

SS
 

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Ayms,
Not sure what kind of accuracy you'll get from your rifle but I shot a 4 7/8" grouping @ 100 yards with the iron sights in the kneeling position. I was using Winchester .30-30 170gr Silvertips.



 

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I've got a 1951 336RC, too. So far Ive shot nothing but Remington 170 gr. loads in it, but they group right around 3" at 100 yards, fired off the bench with the standard iron sights. That's about as well as my eyes can do with open sights and any rifle, and it's most definitely "minute-of-deer".
 
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