Marlin Firearms Forum banner

1 - 20 of 33 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,781 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
My Grandpappy was a prepper by nature. He survived the Great Depression with his family and he handed it down to my Mother. My Dad was just a poor boy, the youngest surviving male in a family of 16 children, (his Dad's first wife died in childbirth and his Dad turned around and married his first wife's younger sister and had another eight kids ... he was the youngest surviving male.) He grew up extremely poor on the wrong side of the tracks in Memphis.

Over the years my family was taught to live by the 7 Fs. (7 has biblical importance to my family - but it still worked out this way.)

Whatever order you choose, all should be seen-to equally.

- Fresh Water ... be ultra redundant. Have many ways of getting it and getting a lot of it. City water will not last long. If you are on a water well have a way to power that pump to get it outta the ground (unless it is shallow enough to use a hand pump or bucket). We've also got ponds and streams on the property and lots of ways to purify it ... boiling it, chemically treating it, filtering it, etc. It is number one. Oh, and have lots of ways to store water. Sure, you can fill a bath tub, but have plenty of 5 gallon buckets, barrels, etc. Empty Clorox bottles. Bladders are excellent and they do not take-up much room when stored waiting to be used in an emergency. You'll save a lot of gennie fuel by filling storage vessels only when your gennie is running. Also, catch systems ... catch all that water coming off your roof. Walmart even sells catch kits these days. All you need are the barrels.

- Firearms ... and the ammo to go with it. Enough to hunt with and enough to defend your family. You decide the details. Do you reload? You should.

- Food ... lots of it. Beans and rice. Seed .. hybrid and heirloom type both. Plenty of stuff to spice it up with ... because beans and rice gets old. These days there are so many emergency meals to choose from but whatever you do have enough to feed each person for a year. Buy canned goods in bulk on sale. Canned meats. Can your own fruits, veggies and meats. Jerk meats. Invest in a good pressure canner and have plenty of canning jars and spare lids on hand. Don't forget the salt, bullion, dried herbs, hot sauces, etc. If you've got a good generator you can run it a few hours a day to keep your freezer and fridge running for awhile. Be sure to have implements on hand to help you garden ... good hoes, shovels, turning forks, etc. We keep a lot of scent free block ivory soap on hand because not only is it an important first aid item, but it can be shaved and diluted to make an excellent insecticide to keep the bugs off of your veggies in the garden. Ivory soap (bars) is cheap at the dollar store. And back to the food. There are so many ways to store food long term ... ask questions right here in this thread if you want to know. We do it in buckets with mylar liners, we do it in water bottles that we use when we backpack. There are just so many ways ... pasta is another great thing to stash away. Lasts forever, mixed with some spices and reconstituted jerky you would be shocked at what a good meal it makes. (one other note on food - have a fuel efficient way of cooking it. Pressure cookers are excellent for rice and beans. Alcohol stoves, Coleman stoves, Kelty Kettles (my personal favorite) and there are other ways to cook other than on an open fire with a cast iron skillet.

- Fire ... ways to start it. Fire separates us from the animals. You gotta cook, you gotta boil, you gotta have light at night, you gotta have heat in the winter. Batteries run-out, you'll need fire eventually. Bic lighters, Zippos and flints, flint and steel, ferris rods, etc. Waterproof matches ... the strike anywhere kind. Heck, even a magnifying glass might come in handy to light a fire ... and to read.

- First Aid ... make sure if you are on prescriptions that you have a few months worth saved up. Also, lots of Benedryl, lots of Asprin, lots of antibotic stuff, lots of dressings, alcohol, tape, surgical stapler, sutures, pain killers like nuproxin, acetaminophen, etc. Pills last just about forever in the fridge. Hemostats of all sizes, EMT sheers, etc. A good trauma kit is a must, but make sure you have lots and lots of things to stop infections. Small things turn big when there are no doctors. I also highly recommend a book I'll talk about in a minute. Spare reading glasses or prescription glasses. And DO NOT forget the soap. It's cheap and easy to store and it's important when talking hygiene, germ killing, etc. And don't forget the oral hygiene. Big bags of baking soda will go a long ways doing a lot of things like brushing teeth, antacid, etc. Toilet paper also falls in this category ... and if your wife is still young enough, don't forget the female special needs. Tampons also make excellent bullet plugs in an emergency. Again, invest in some good emergency medicine books that might help you through tough times. (More on that below)

- Fuel ... you'll need it to run your generators, your engines (whatever they may be), etc. You'll need it to start fires in inclement weather. Fuel also includes firewood (and don't forget the axes and chainsaws). It includes lighter fluid for that Zippo. It includes gels. It includes tinder like char clothe, lighter wood (turpentine wood), etc. We invested in a gas and diesel tank for our farm but for two decades we stored fuel in 55 gallon drums. We also have a 500 gallon propane tank and a lot of smaller ones I buy when they are on sale and I get them filled locally. (I've got a lister peter diesel generator, a Troy-Bilt gas generator and a Champion I converted to propane that runs like a top. Another thing that falls under the fuel category because it falls under the energy category ... everyone should have a solar panel or two stashed away and know how to set it up and use it to charge batteries. Small solar energy kits are inexpensive these days and well worth the investment. You can recharge batteries for your lights, you can run a DC fan in hot weather. You'll need batteries to run your radios and recharge your electronics. Oh, and when it comes to gas and diesel, use a fuel additive that will help it last ... but be sure to rotate it. Don't let it go sour. I use Marine Stabil on just about everything and it works. We have barrels of ethanol free too, that do not have to be rotated as often.

- Fixes ... have things you'll need to fix things. Good tools, nuts and bolts. Nails and hammers. Spare fan belts, hoses, oil and filters. Parts to fix your generator. Parts to fix your tractor. Lots and lots of duct tape ... get the good stuff. Glues of all kinds. (yes, you can fix a tooth with super glue). Have a few sheets of plywood stashed away if you have the space. If not, a big roll of thick poly will cover broken windows if necessary. Fix a Flat and Slime are both good to have on hand. Spare water pipe and joints and the glue to make them work. Hoses are important. Rubber patches and plugs. Sewing kits. The list goes on and on and on. Invest in some books that will help you to do things in tough times. You may not have the Internet to fall back on. (more on that below)

The Bonus F

This one goes, or went, without saying for people who lived through the Great Depression. It still applies today but most people blow it off as not that important. To my family, it's probably the most important thing of all.

- Finances ... get them in order. Pay off bills. Stash some cash and silver bullion away if possible. Be debt free. Keep only one credit card and use it only in emergencies. Drive paid-for vehicles that are reliable and well kept. Consider all those preps above, the 7 Fs ... consider that survival insurance. Invest in your preps like you do your retirement account. If you do it right and rotate properly preps will last a lifetime and can be passed down to your kids. But do not pass debt down to your kids. No sense in preaching here about finances ... everyone knows what's right and what's wrong when it comes to their own finances.

Okay, so some books. Books are an important resource and I mentioned them a couple of times above. I've put together a little library of prep books ...







Please add your thoughts ... there are so many things we all can share with one another. Little things not all of us might be thinking about.

Prepping is insurance for tough times ... it's not end of the world stuff. It's not total social collapse, although that could well happen. But prepping is being prudent and prepared to exist and survive, for your entire family, in tough times.

Tough times are coming. Whether it happens in yours and mine lifetime, or in the lifetimes of your children or grandchildren, tough times are coming ... it is inevitable.

Using the 7 F method, plus the bonus F if you are so inclined, will help you to avoid the one big F that you do not want to fool with .... Failure.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
9,716 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
188 Posts
One to add, live in the boonies.
I'm ahead of the curve on that. But even at that I'll add this little bit.

I don't care what it is, if your dependent on it......it's a weak link. I don't care what it is, medications, clothing, etc, your crippled in a hurry. Knowledge and abilities are key components and if it's a marketable skill, your better off than most out there. Communications of any kind are going to be in high demand, remember those old CB radios? Build an antenna and your better than most.

And above all stay away from trade bait, if someone knows you have something they want, and they don't have anything you want, it'll get interesting PDQ.

I can really go nutz on threads like this, but I wont..
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
9,716 Posts
or a small town in Wyoming..
with neighbors you can trust....but GRUMPA hit it...if you are on any kind of medication things will be difficult
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
188 Posts
Hopefully I'll steer folks in a direction with this.

For Folks on a BUDGET.

Wife and I live on less than what most folks have taken out in the way of taxes. So don't thumb your nose at this suggestion because it's what we do. We get 50Lb bags of cracked corn from the feed store, along with 50Lb bags of wheat, and yes I said feed store. We make our own bread and noodles here, the bread with the ground wheat, and the noodles with flour,eggs, and salt. The corn we grind up the same way as the wheat, and we make some thump-in good cornbread with it, turns out more like a dessert than anything around here.

We buy those during the winter months, and leave them OUTSIDE to freeze to kill off any bugs and/or insect eggs.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,345 Posts
Same stuff; wheat is wheat, corn is corn. The store bought might have been through the cleaner a little more but you can do that too.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,946 Posts
These 'prepper' threads are always great to read. It's always good to be reminded, one more time, of how important it is to be prepared the best you can be.

This thread also dove-tails perfectly with what I just experienced this past week-end. This week-end celebrated the 200th anniversary of our ancestor and his family being one of the first permanent white settlers in this area. These very rugged and self reliant folks had to grow and raise and gather and hunt and barter & trade for nearly everything. They had to chop down trees & split logs or use whole logs for their usually very small log cabins, make their own oak shingles for the roof, quarry & dress & move big sandstone blocks for steps and other uses. This was along the White River in North Arkansas so they could buy and trade/barter for goods coming up & down the river and send logs down river to places like Memphis and down to New Orleans. Talk about some rugged folks..!! Many lived to their 80's, many did not. Many children died very early; many only living a few days or weeks or maybe a year or so. But they kept on having and raising children...and never...never gave up. And they turned a wilderness into productive land and many became very prosperous and active in local and even state politics and were well known and respected.

These folks did everyday what we talk about in these SHTF scenarios. Yep...if...when...it happens, many will die quickly and many will die slower. I hope that if we are still here when "it" happens, or if "it" happens to our children or even their children, that we & they will have prepared adequately and will survive to help restore sanity to this Country.

So...it's good to always be reminded and good to go thru the check list and hopefully be adding to our own supplies and preparedness list.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
188 Posts
I keep telling myself I wont go overboard, but maybe it's a good thing I don't listen to myself.

We are off the grid here in NE AZ and supply ourselves on our own as far as utilities are concerned. Our appliances are elect powdered but very low power usage, the fridge uses 1amp, the freezer uses 2amps, and that's 120v A/C.

This time of year we use the swamp cooler, and right how it's 85deg outside, inside it's 68deg but the sun's down so no power. Having thought about it some, reading and researching, I made my own D/C generator. It's wired directly into my battery bank, and at an idle produces 400wts D/C but uses just under 1gal of fuel and will run for 11+hrs. Batteries don't get down charged at all and it's almost like living on the grid. You just aren't going to be vacuuming or running the dishwasher after sundown.

Load Center (520 x 390).jpg

Solar Array (520 x 390).jpg

Here's the generator, had the stater winding done to provide 37V D/C.

Jennie.JPG
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,705 Posts
Dang, I got an 'F'........
 
  • Like
Reactions: Gallo Pazzesco

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,781 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
I'm ahead of the curve on that. But even at that I'll add this little bit.

I don't care what it is, if your dependent on it......it's a weak link. I don't care what it is, medications, clothing, etc, your crippled in a hurry. Knowledge and abilities are key components and if it's a marketable skill, your better off than most out there. Communications of any kind are going to be in high demand, remember those old CB radios? Build an antenna and your better than most.

And above all stay away from trade bait, if someone knows you have something they want, and they don't have anything you want, it'll get interesting PDQ.

I can really go nutz on threads like this, but I wont..
No, do ... go totally nutz on this thread. That's what it's for. A lot more of us around here are preppers than most realize.

I agree totally BTW - being dependent on something is not good. But all of us are dependent on food and water so I always start there.

Here's another thing few consider that my Internist told me one time. Centuries ago people could get away with not taking baths but once or twice a year if they were so inclined and other around them could stand the stink (although the Greeks and Romans were way ahead of the game in that regard). These days, if we did that, the bugs that have evolved would eat us alive. We'd be covered in sores, cancerous, leprosy ridden creatures within a couple of years.

It's important to remember that we have quickly evolved into what we are these days - and the microbes have evolved right along with us. So soap and water ... we are dependent on it, among other things.

Hopefully I'll steer folks in a direction with this.

For Folks on a BUDGET.

Wife and I live on less than what most folks have taken out in the way of taxes. So don't thumb your nose at this suggestion because it's what we do. We get 50Lb bags of cracked corn from the feed store, along with 50Lb bags of wheat, and yes I said feed store. We make our own bread and noodles here, the bread with the ground wheat, and the noodles with flour,eggs, and salt. The corn we grind up the same way as the wheat, and we make some thump-in good cornbread with it, turns out more like a dessert than anything around here.

We buy those during the winter months, and leave them OUTSIDE to freeze to kill off any bugs and/or insect eggs.
Yep ... we bucket grain around here as well. We get it from our local feed and seed and I'll toss some dichotomous earth, vacuum pack it and then toss it in the deep freeze for three days before putting it in a bucket to keep any potential critters from gnawing through it.

Be sure to have a real good hand crank grain mill. We've got two, both of them from Lehman's.

These 'prepper' threads are always great to read. It's always good to be reminded, one more time, of how important it is to be prepared the best you can be.

This thread also dove-tails perfectly with what I just experienced this past week-end. This week-end celebrated the 200th anniversary of our ancestor and his family being one of the first permanent white settlers in this area. These very rugged and self reliant folks had to grow and raise and gather and hunt and barter & trade for nearly everything. They had to chop down trees & split logs or use whole logs for their usually very small log cabins, make their own oak shingles for the roof, quarry & dress & move big sandstone blocks for steps and other uses. This was along the White River in North Arkansas so they could buy and trade/barter for goods coming up & down the river and send logs down river to places like Memphis and down to New Orleans. Talk about some rugged folks..!! Many lived to their 80's, many did not. Many children died very early; many only living a few days or weeks or maybe a year or so. But they kept on having and raising children...and never...never gave up. And they turned a wilderness into productive land and many became very prosperous and active in local and even state politics and were well known and respected.

These folks did everyday what we talk about in these SHTF scenarios. Yep...if...when...it happens, many will die quickly and many will die slower. I hope that if we are still here when "it" happens, or if "it" happens to our children or even their children, that we & they will have prepared adequately and will survive to help restore sanity to this Country.

So...it's good to always be reminded and good to go thru the check list and hopefully be adding to our own supplies and preparedness list.
This goes back to my Fixes F ... having good tools. We invested in a good cross cut saw for instance - found it cheap at an antique barn. Another tool I got a little crazy obsessed with for awhile is an adze. I ended up with several sizes. And the axes and wedges ... I've got waaaay too many, always looking for another good one. The best deals you can find on those kind of things is on eBay. You'll have to put handles on all of them because people find them, don't know what they are half the time, and then they auction them cheap. I've found a lot of great old meat cleavers the same way and meat cleavers are important.

I keep telling myself I wont go overboard, but maybe it's a good thing I don't listen to myself.

We are off the grid here in NE AZ and supply ourselves on our own as far as utilities are concerned. Our appliances are elect powdered but very low power usage, the fridge uses 1amp, the freezer uses 2amps, and that's 120v A/C.

This time of year we use the swamp cooler, and right how it's 85deg outside, inside it's 68deg but the sun's down so no power. Having thought about it some, reading and researching, I made my own D/C generator. It's wired directly into my battery bank, and at an idle produces 400wts D/C but uses just under 1gal of fuel and will run for 11+hrs. Batteries don't get down charged at all and it's almost like living on the grid. You just aren't going to be vacuuming or running the dishwasher after sundown.

View attachment 236225

View attachment 236233

Here's the generator, had the stater winding done to provide 37V D/C.

View attachment 236241
God Bless you ... and man after my own heart. Loved the pictures! Keep'em coming!

Speaking of cooling off. Here in the Southeast it is so hot and humid, unlike the desert west, we have real problems during the heat of the summer if the power goes out and you cannot cool things down. We've had 23 straight days of over 100 heat factor where I am. Sitting here right now it is about to go over 100 again today.

We've got two big central HVAC systems on this house, a 3.5 ton on one side and a 5 ton on the other. It would be unbearable down here if we lost power for months in the summer. So I invested in a couple of window units that run off of the generators. We can close off part of the house and keep a small area dehumidified and cool at nights at least. And I am about to get rid of some of the current 110 ceiling fans (we have nine of them in this house now) and convert to DC ceiling fans to run off of my battery bank. Hot or cold, keeping air circulating is important.

I was recently told there are now DC powered floor fans as well and I intend to look into those.

I am cooked, Type I diabetic and post kidney transplant. Constellation of drugs. Put me on the first line.
I've had two heart attacks ... runs in the family unfortunately. So I'm on a few drugs as well. I've been able to store-up over a year's worth of spare drugs just by refilling the first day possible each 90 days - it adds up over time.

People on insulin are now asking their doctors to overprescribe. For instance, if you are taking 200 units a day of Novolog for instance, and 100 of Levermere, ask your doctor to prescribe 300 units a day and 150 a day so that you can store-up some spare and keep it in the fridge. It too will add up over time and your doctor will understand if you tell him why. In the meantime, your deductible and copay stays the same regardless of quantity so it is no more out of pocket. It's a way to stockpile some extra drugs. Doctors are usually very friendly towards having backup drugs by the way ... they'll help you.

Some more pictures ... homemade diesel generator. Lister Peter, I bought the engine from an Air Force surplus sale they used it for warming up jet engines on the runway.

I got the genset from a company not far from here across the state line and then designed it to turn at the proper RPMs (without going into too much detail) ... the frame and switches were easy.



Here's my Son getting an early morning lesson (some years ago, he's almost grown now) at the fish camp about how to crank up the Base Camp Kelly Kettle. This thing is incredible - runs on twigs basically. Ultra efficient and fast boiler plus you cook on top. By the time the water is boiling the eggs and bacon are scrambled.



Storing rice in empty water bottles. Each one holds exactly 1 pd of packed rice. Now, normally we store rice in five gallon buckets vacuum packed in mylar. But we do these every now and then so we have food to pack for camping trips, back packing, road trips to see family, etc. They are very handy. One pound of rice and a pack of vacuum packed tuna with some saved soy sauce packets from when you order Chinese take-up ... we've eaten a bunch of this stuff at the fish camp and when backpacking.

 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
23,908 Posts
Before one starts out on any endeavor--the 7 Ps always come first. Learned that in the Army. The 7 Ps stands for: Proper Prior Planning Prevents Piss Poor Performance. Once you practice the 7 Ps--things always start out smoother and the 7 Ps should be conducted continually--not just at the outset of ones initial action.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
188 Posts
When we bought this place it was just raw land, living up here for us is rather serene and peaceful, and when we moved here we quickly found out we do much better on our own than with people around us.

Through trial and error (mostly error) we are still learning, with the realization that there's so much to learn, you need like minded people close by, which we don't have.

Water: For anyone storing water here's a helpful tip. Don't store water all in 1 place, disperse it throughout the building. There's always scenarios, hypothetical possibilities that a person can go nuts in short order. Wife and I have a saying: "Never keep all your eggs in 1 basket" and the reason is, if something happens to that basket you have no eggs.

Food: Same as above, but we take it a step further.

We get the raw product, the basics of foods. Reason being it takes knowledge and experience to prepare the final meal. If or when something happens having canned or boxed (heat and eat type things) your going to realize those are going to be high demand because it requires absolutely no knowledge to use and it's pretty much a given that the longer anything goes on the more hungry folks are going to get.

And keep this in mind: You may be fine for food, but a hungry person smelling it will want it, and smells travel for miles.

Medications: For the most part unless they're something common, folks wont try and get them.

For something you rely on, or think your going to rely on for that matter, never have just 1 of it, have 2 and have 1 for a back up. Here we have 2 trucks, if 1 breaks we can use the other till we get the other 1 fixed, and the mechanic is me and I do have tools. We had the door latch mechanism break a few months back, can't drive the truck with no way to close the door, odd things like that.

MURPHY: I'm sure most of us if not all know that person. Whatever can go wrong will go wrong at the worst possible moment. So always try to keep that sucker somewhere else and not close by.

I wrote this about generators on another site some time ago. Generators are great when you need them, and around here sound travels, for a long way. The longer anything goes on the more desperate folks are going to be, and draw folks to the sound like a moth to a flame. The 1 we use we can't here past our driveway, which is less than 100' away.

Ammo: Could possibly become scarce, learn to reload and have enough for yourself and never use it for trade bait, biggest mistake you could make doing that. If you have a lot keep it to yourself, I only load what I need and folks wont even try to learn to reload even knowing there's a book(s) out there on how to reload for the complete idiot. It just utterly amazes me people just don't have even the most basic understanding of how to reload there own. I've learned to cast and actually make my own jacketed rounds from empty brass cases, sure it takes work but the results are stupendous and I get better accuracy. So long as I have lead I have what I need in order to get what I want, well lead and a couple of the alloys to harden them up. Haven't learned to make my own BP yet, but I might, taking care of this place and the Mrs. doesn't leave much time for much.

Fuel: That's something that'll be great with this understanding. People with no fuel are going to want what you have, and the longer anything continues even driving to the market is going to be a challenge when there will be more and more folks walking to there destination.

Around here we grow things, that is when mother nature is with us. We have apple trees, apricot trees, grapes, and grow a few veggies. We have problems with the birds eating our apples months before they even ripen. We have tomato horn worms actually eating the leaves off of our Ash trees, grape leaves, poplar tree leaves, and our tomato plants with great frequency. I tell the wife in the morning I'm going hunting, she knows what that means, I'm spending my time looking for those little plant munching SOB'S and feeding them off to the chickens, I call it chicken candy. It's real hard to plant things here, the soil is pretty much from another planet, even the trees we planted have to struggle. Getting water out of the ground can be hard at times, the pump runs on 120V A/C but we use the sun for power and when the clouds come in there's not enough power to run the pump and we have just under a 3Kw system. Watering things like our trees (just under 30 trees) uses over 1.7K gallons and the pump pumps water at a rate of 5gal a minute. We have it that way because we don't want to depend on a big, noisy big generator, we used to but they break, and even though they sell replacement parts they cost almost as much as the generator did when we bought it. And that's why I built my own, simple to work on, reliable, low noise, and above all parts are dang easy to find and get, and yes I do have backups for the generator.

We don't have a cow or anything big here, we just don't have the freezer space to be able to handle something that large. Trying to get the neighbors involved in anything is pointless here, they wont lift a finger for anything but want you to do all the work, so that's out.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,781 Posts
Discussion Starter #15
Before one starts out on any endeavor--the 7 Ps always come first. Learned that in the Army. The 7 Ps stands for: Proper Prior Planning Prevents Piss Poor Performance. Once you practice the 7 Ps--things always start out smoother and the 7 Ps should be conducted continually--not just at the outset of ones initial action.
Sooooooo, you wanna turn this into an alphabet thing huh?

Okay, I'm game. Let's go ...

The 7 A's of Dementia ... Altered Perception, Amnesia, Apathy, Apraxia, Aphasia, Agnosia, Anosoognosia

The 7 B's of .... just kidding.

Seriously though, I remember those 7 Ps from the military as well - had a 1SG who used to preach them religiously. Also, when I was growing up my Mom was big on the 7 P's of Prayer. I still remember them - Power, Presence, Privilege, Peace. Preciousness, Provision and Protection of Prayer.

Who remembers the 7 C's of communication? You must be ... Clear, Concise, Concrete, Correct, Coherent, Complete and Courteous.

And then we have the Seven Seas of ... oh, wait, ummm, errrrr. I'm getting a little carried away I guess.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
23,908 Posts
Sooooooo, you wanna turn this into an alphabet thing huh?

Okay, I'm game. Let's go ...

The 7 A's of Dementia ... Altered Perception, Amnesia, Apathy, Apraxia, Aphasia, Agnosia, Anosoognosia

The 7 B's of .... just kidding.

Seriously though, I remember those 7 Ps from the military as well - had a 1SG who used to preach them religiously. Also, when I was growing up my Mom was big on the 7 P's of Prayer. I still remember them - Power, Presence, Privilege, Peace. Preciousness, Provision and Protection of Prayer.

Who remembers the 7 C's of communication? You must be ... Clear, Concise, Concrete, Correct, Coherent, Complete and Courteous.

And then we have the Seven Seas of ... oh, wait, ummm, errrrr. I'm getting a little carried away I guess.
Never leaned anything about the Seven Seas--I was never a squid or a GyRine. :marchmellow:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,946 Posts
I know that the number 7 is the number of completion, so is that maybe why we have all these 7's categories..??

Very interesting..!

And..I was in the Navy but I only spent one week on a boat, so I guess that doesn't make me a squid....we were called airdales. I was in an aviation squadron based out of N.A.S. Norfolk, Va. Now, we were always flying down to Puerto Rico for war exercises and we flew over the water a lot ..Ha..and even had instrument problems occasionally as we flew through part of the Bermuda Triangle...no joke..!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,946 Posts
That's a great idea about storing rice in water bottles.! I like my Sprites and am always throwing away the empty bottles. Now I know what to do with my empties..!!

And that got me to thinking about those wide mouth bottles of juices; the ones that are about 2 quarts. They could be used the same way for other dried items like beans and pasta and even sugar and flour.

The thing that I noticed, though, is that a few years ago, my daughter and I bought extra canned goods. Well, we weren't rotating through them and slowly using them and replacing what we used. We just kinda forgot about them So...the expiration date came and went. Now, my daughter is a little over the top about not using anything that has 'expired'...drives me crazy..! Even dried goods that aren't gonna spoil...shesshh..! Sometimes I win the battle, often I lose..!! So...rotating thru the canned goods and not just forgetting about them and possibly coming up with spoiled cans of whatever...is important to remember. Besides it could be waste of a lot of money.

This is one of the valuable lessons I learned about long term storage. Yea...I need to learn how to can stuff that will last several years and more...just never seems to happen even though I know very well that it's something I really need to get off my backside and learn. Especially before times get tough and Mason jars and canning supplies disappear off the shelves..!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,781 Posts
Discussion Starter #19 (Edited)
That's a great idea about storing rice in water bottles.! I like my Sprites and am always throwing away the empty bottles. Now I know what to do with my empties..!!

And that got me to thinking about those wide mouth bottles of juices; the ones that are about 2 quarts. They could be used the same way for other dried items like beans and pasta and even sugar and flour.

The thing that I noticed, though, is that a few years ago, my daughter and I bought extra canned goods. Well, we weren't rotating through them and slowly using them and replacing what we used. We just kinda forgot about them So...the expiration date came and went. Now, my daughter is a little over the top about not using anything that has 'expired'...drives me crazy..! Even dried goods that aren't gonna spoil...shesshh..! Sometimes I win the battle, often I lose..!! So...rotating thru the canned goods and not just forgetting about them and possibly coming up with spoiled cans of whatever...is important to remember. Besides it could be waste of a lot of money.
If you keep store bought canned-goods cool and dark they can easily last a couple two or three years past their "best by" date.

Dried pasta, rice and beans will last almost forever if you keep the air off of them and in a cool dark place.

This is how long we've been prepping around my house.

We rotate buckets. Our rotation stock on rice, beans and pasta is now in 2005 mode ... we're 11 years behind.

We just pulled some vacuum packed Great Value "pouch" tuna from the freezer dated 2007 ... it was still in the dark solid blue packs back then and almost twice the volume at half the price it is now - which almost makes one sick when you think about the economics of that in less than ten years. They've cut the packs to half the OZ weight that they were and the newer packs are twice as much. The packs we're using from the bottom of one of the freezers from 2007 are 12 oz vacuum pouched and they were .93 cents a pack. The current packs are 6.4 oz and they are $2.00 a pouch. Twice as much for half the volume ... that's what, a 400% increase during Obama's tenure in office?

It boggles the mind - it really does. No one is getting raises and food prices, in many instances, have quadrupled.

It absolutely boggles the mind.

Anyways, this tuna we froze in 2007 is just like new ... we've been using it with our rice dishes, our tuna salads and sandwiches, etc. We had over 100 pouches down there ... we've been working to the bottom of that one freezer, wanting to eat everything out of there so I can give it to one of my daughters and invest in another larger chest freezer. We've got three chest freezers, two medium and one large - I'm upsizing to two large.

Rice you can do it plastic bottles because you can shake it down and not much air is left in rice.

Beans and pasta ... you cannot get enough beans in a bottle to make the balance work with the rice, pasta either.

Now, one thing about pasta for prepping. Always stash and cache the pasta that cooks the fastest. Stay away from thick dried pastas because they take too much time and energy to cook shtf. Stay with the really macro sea shells or angel hair or the very very smallest of the elbow macaroni. Avoid the thick stuff - it's a nightmare to cook with modern fuel stoves and it also takes a lot more water.

Oh ... and store away plenty of chicken and beef bullion.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
9,716 Posts
And vacuum sealers are your friend for everything from frozen foods to dried stuff.
 
1 - 20 of 33 Posts
Top