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My brother-in-law gave me this one yesterday. It was in an old building that was my father-in-law's. I'd like to know anything about it if anyone has information on it.

It's going to be a wall hanger, but I don't know if I should just clean it up a bit & leave it at that or get deeper into a non working restoration.

If there is a better place to post this for more info, please move.
Thanks, trad

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Howdy tradarcher

I’ll be watching your thread because I’m doing the same thing.
I was gifted a double barrel black powder shotgun. Just a a wall hanger.
I took apart what I could.. cleaned off the rust.. shined up the brass hardware.. refinished the stock.
looks nice but it’s missing the ramrod. I bought a 3/8 dowel to make one. Looking for the brass button for the end now.
 

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That's a cut back military musket from the 1830s approximately. As far as I can tell it was originally a flintlock. I can't get the photos to enlarge, so it's hard to see. It was very common for military muskets to be "sporterized" and used as shotguns to feed your family in the 1800s. Most all of the pre-1850s guns were smooth bore, so they worked fine. A person that is up on military muskets of the day can give you a model and better date. I'd leave it as it is and just do a mild cleaning. If those old guns could talk.
 

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That's a cut back military musket from the 1830s approximately. As far as I can tell it was originally a flintlock. I can't get the photos to enlarge, so it's hard to see. It was very common for military muskets to be "sporterized" and used as shotguns to feed your family in the 1800s. Most all of the pre-1850s guns were smooth bore, so they worked fine. A person that is up on military muskets of the day can give you a model and better date. I'd leave it as it is and just do a mild cleaning. If those old guns could talk.
:dito:
 

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Howdy tradarcher

I’ll be watching your thread because I’m doing the same thing.
I was gifted a double barrel black powder shotgun. Just a a wall hanger.
I took apart what I could.. cleaned off the rust.. shined up the brass hardware.. refinished the stock.
looks nice but it’s missing the ramrod. I bought a 3/8 dowel to make one. Looking for the brass button for the end now.
For the brass button, you may want to look at the brass lamp shade risers (Lowe's or other big box store that carries lamp parts) or the brass nuts (finials) for lamp shades.
 

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Hard to tell. Some guns were put together by an assortment of parts. Lock looks like a conversion using a military hammer, but the plate is not military. Trigger guard does have a hole for a sling swivel. There were American copies and the barrel is not right. I personally think its a "black smiths" gun put together with what was available.

Black powder shotguns lasted well into the cartridge era. And when you get into the Southern States like you are from up into the 1900's in the more remote areas. BP fire arms were very usable as powder could be locally made, and caps were about all that was needed. All kinds of things could be fired out of a shotgun. That's my guess.

DEP
 

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There is a theory in Black powder gun knowledge that I ascribe to, that we have a Cadillac view of what guns were used back in the day. That the fancier Pennsylvania rifles survived in a larger percentage than the plain work a day guns. These guns saw harder use and tended to break down and be discarded over time. A Hawken barrel was once found as a fence post. The fancier ones got hung on walls as decoration and survived. There are quite a few 73 Winchesters in use today but there were a lot of them made. Many are not in very good shape. They were relatively expensive in their day. Also more durable than most muzzle loaders. While they served well in their time, as they were made obsolete they were discarded. Many collectors disagree with me and maybe they are right, but I still think the plain utility firearms of their day are not seen today.

I say this because when muzzle loaders are found, many hope they have found some valuable treasure worth several dollars if appraised at Antiques Roadshow. Those rifles like a Dickert I saw appraised at 75,000 are signed and verified and were noted as near works of art in their day. The Savage axis equivalent rifles served their users well like the Axis does today, but just are not collectable to any extent. Popularity enters in also. Northwest Trade Guns, were an item traded to the Native Americans during the fur trade days. After some writers explained their use every wannabe mountain man thought they should have one and the prices went out of sight for originals. They were an inexpensive trade item and as rifle builder I could see the shortcuts in their manufacture. However some were made that did not function well and once the Natives recognized them they were not a tradeable item. They had to be functional.


DEP
 

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That's a cut back military musket from the 1830s approximately. As far as I can tell it was originally a flintlock. I can't get the photos to enlarge, so it's hard to see. It was very common for military muskets to be "sporterized" and used as shotguns to feed your family in the 1800s. Most all of the pre-1850s guns were smooth bore, so they worked fine. A person that is up on military muskets of the day can give you a model and better date. I'd leave it as it is and just do a mild cleaning. If those old guns could talk.
^^^THIS^^^
The lock plate markings are still there. I can see some of it when the photo is enlarged. You will probably need to remove the metal strap nailed around the wrist to see all of it.The early locks are marked in the area to the rear of the hammer pivot. Whether or not you want to remove the band and clean up the lock to see what markings are left is your decision. These old conversion guns are not worth much, especially in rough shape like this one. Back in the era these were in use there were gunsmiths everywhere, as common then as auto repair shops and tire shops are today. Many had their own name on them, many also made guns from surplus military parts and guns. Could possibly be a m1816 or a combination of any of the other dozen models made.
 

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Years ago we had an 1822 Whitney flintlock that had been converted to percussion and then at some point converted to a shotgun. While your's looks very rough, compare some pictures of the lock.
 

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While you do some clean up do check for a load. Very often these guns sat by the door or in the barn ready to go.
Probably an armory conversion to caplock. Forend probably busted sometime in it's life and cut off at a convenient point. I am not up on military guns but I do believe this one was just sporterized at some point not made from parts.
I would not do much more than clean the grime off and oil the metal.
 

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Don't know what it is, but it looks cool. The tape on the forestock is priceless. Definitely a utility type of gun. Reminds me of an old tool kit with bailing wire and duct tape in it. Did what you had to the keep it in service.
V
 
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