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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
This past April at turkey camp we ran across pathces of morel mushrooms while hunting. THey are the only 100% foolproof shroom. No others have a sponge-like top. WE picked a ton, and added them to our venison stew. We boiled them first to softn them up even more, and woo-wee was that stew good!! YOu can eat them things plain, bread them, pizza, but I mostly like them in stew. If anyone has any other morel ideas let me know.
 

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Try them diced in scrambled eggs or omelets as well. FYI.. There are also false morels, learn to identify and avoid them.
 

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False morels? I did not know such a thing existed. COuld you tell me more about false morels? and thier range across the U.S? thanks for the heads up.- Rudy
 

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To my knowledge there are perhaps four varieties of "False Morels", but being located in Ohio you could probably come in contact with only one or two types while out morel hunting. The ones to be concerned with are the (Brown False Morel <Gyromitra brunnea>),and also <Gyromitra esculenta>. They grow in the spring time and are somewhat similar in shape and color to a black or grey morel, I suspect this is why they're called false morels. They're easily discernable from the edible morels if a person is aware of what to look for. They are considered poisonous, but not deadly. Probably wouldn't kill a healthy individual but could certainly take the edge off of your day. I'm no expert (just a shroom picker) so get yourself a good shroom field guide for your area of the country and check it out. Morels are labeled as one of the foolproof four, but can throw the unaware eye a curve on occasion.
The following is an excerpt from a field guide...
Gyromitra esculenta is one of several common species of false morels found in the spring about the same time as the true morels. It is also sometimes known as the beefsteak morel, or the lorchel. The Gyromitra species are Ascomycota that superficially resemble the Morels (Morchella esculenta, M. elata and related species). They can be found in roughly the same areas as the true morels and the two genera often grow in close proximity to one another. In our area we usually find false morels rather close to fallen logs, where a microniche of moisture, humidity, and shade is likely to be found, but there is quite a bit of variability in their habitat.
 
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