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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I shot my model seven bolt gun at the range yesterday with 200 grain corelocks loaded fairly warm with IMR 3031 powder and they did just as I expected 3/4 inch 4 shop group exactly 2 1/2 inches high at 100 yards. I put 3 Hornady 200 grain LE's in the rifle and they shot exactly dead center 2 1/2 inches below the corelocks. The recoil felt the same. I have chronoed the LE's and they are 2100 fps. Could it be the corelocks are much hotter to have shot that much higher? There is absolutely no pressure signs on the corelocks. The primers are not flat, the brass is not stretched and extraction is good but the handloads don't flip out like the LE's when the bolt is opened slow. Any answer will be appreciated.

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Horseshoe
 

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My guess it the Remingtons are shooting at a lower velocity than the Hornadys. :eek:
Recoil actually starts the instant the primer goes bang. As the muzzle rises the bullet eventually leaves the bore (We're talking milliseconds here). The higher the velocity the sooner the bullet leaves during the rise. The slower load will allow the muzzle to climb much higher before the bullet exits the muzzle. Makes sense when you think about it. If you can, run those loads over a chronograph. I'll bet you a buck I'm right. ;)
Paul B.
 

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Paul B said:
My guess it the Remingtons are shooting at a lower velocity than the Hornadys. :eek:
Recoil actually starts the instant the primer goes bang. As the muzzle rises the bullet eventually leaves the bore (We're talking milliseconds here). The higher the velocity the sooner the bullet leaves during the rise. The slower load will allow the muzzle to climb much higher before the bullet exits the muzzle. Makes sense when you think about it. If you can, run those loads over a chronograph. I'll bet you a buck I'm right. ;)
Paul B.
Pretty much what he said. The shorter the barrel, the more apparent this becomes. In my 1911, Speer 200 gr "Flying Ashtrays" with a healthy dose of Unique coaxed along at ~925 fps will shoot three inches lower at 25 yards than my 200 gr SWC bullseye loads running ~800 fps.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I know what everyone is saying is true but when I first got the rifle I shot 200 grain LE's and zeroed at 100 yards. Just for funnies I shot factory 200 grain corelocks and the corelocks printed about 1 inch lower than the LE's. The other day I shot the hot loaded corelocks and they were 2 1/2 high at 100 yards and the LE's were 2 1/2 inches lower. I was thinking the Corelocks were shooting faster and that was the reason for them being higher. Oh well just need to get a chronograph.
 

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What temperatures were all the loads fired at, and what powders are you using in your handloads? Could be that some temp sensitivity of the particular powder is making a difference?
 

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For handguns, higher velocity bullets will shoot lower than the lower velocity ones because of the aforementioned time of travel in the bore and the rise of barrel during recoil.
In rifles I've noticed the opposite effects and higher velocity bullets will impact higher on the target than slower ones. It is quite possible you are getting more velocity in your reloads than the factory FTX loads especially in a bolt action rifle.
I wonder if both loads will somewhat equal out in trajectory at longer distances since the FTX will retain more velocity at the longer range and the 200 Rems were sighted in higher at 100 yards but drop more with distance due to the blunt shape.
 
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