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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I was in a antique shop today, and found a Marlin 89C. Semi-auto, walnut stock with bulls eye, small removable magazine (4-5rds). Looks like an old gun to me. I've never heard of a 89C, the price tag said he was asking $210.00 for it.

I'm guessing $210.00 was too much, but I know nothing about the 89C.

Help...
 

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The clip fed model 89 is a sister to the tube fed Model 88. Here's a thread with plenty of info and takedown hints on the Model 88, much of which is applicable to the 89...

http://www.marlinowners.com/forums/index.php/topic,61532.0.html

And a vintage add you may find interesting...

http://www.marlinowners.com/forums/index.php/topic,61532.0.html

Although I've seen asking prices on Model 88s and 89s as high as $300 to $350, I can't say I've ever seen either one sell for more than $150 or so. If it appeals to you...there's no harm in offering him less. I doubt he's had folks standing in line to buy it. Pity, really...they're a fascinating rifle...man-sized and all steel and walnut...and every report I been privy to has touted their accuracy. Mine has been no exception...



Roe
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Much thanks for all the info Barenjager! Your 88 with the Weaver scope is beautiful! I think I may go look at it again, I know it's been there all winter. I noticed there was rust on the barrel, looks like he just rubbed an oiled rag over it. I think 0000 steel wool and WD40 would do wonders for it. Stock doesn't look too bad, light patina of use, if I remember correctly.

Thanks ever so much for posting the ad's and break down diagrams! If I do purchase the 89, I'll know who to thank for sharing the info!
 

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That 88 is the best looking gun- I mean it!

As for the clean up and restoration work for the 89C-

For the metal- I recommend you start with strong rubbing alcohol- 98% if you can find it. Use that to clean off any grease, solvents, cleaners- residue that might be left on it. Then I would kroil it with steel wool until it looks like its free of rust and dirt. Then alcohol again- get it clean. Then you can re-blue, touch up blue- whatever.

As for the wood- I always start with Murphy's oil soap. A good wash and rinse and then evaluate what you have. From there you may want to strip and refinish- or just touch up with a matching stain or oil finish.

The 88's and 89's are great guns. I always have my eye out for an 88DL.... someday.

M
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I decided to go ahead and buy it, it was still there (at the antique shop), and I wanted it. So I asked the shopkeeper to call the seller and see if he would accept $150.00 for it. Remember he was asking $210.00. We went back and forth and settled on $170.00. It's a bit rough, but I think it will clean up to a fairly presentable rifle. Not too long ago I won an 4x El Paso Texas Weaver, in very
good condition. Also, the rifle came with what looks like a 15rd Magazine. I'm not familiar with that magazine. Sorry about the pics, having a bad camera day today I guess.











I could have sworn I down-sized those pics before I posted them, see what I mean about "having a bad camera day"? PhotoBucket says they are 640x480 but they don't look it to me.
 

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Congrats Audie! Great gun. Its in pretty good condition overall and it should clean up and look even better. If you go ahead and do some restoration work on it you will have a real beauty.

The Marlin 88s and 89s are not well known overall, but they are very good guns. Accurate and reliable for sure. Easy to maintain.

Enjoy your new shooter.

M
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Here's a couple more recent pics. It needs rebluing, I'm going to study these "do-it-yourself" procedures. But I will probably drop this one off at a local smith, it also needs some trigger work.



 

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That's a good looking gun. Excellent wood on it.

These are real good shooters too. I think they are worth the effort to fix them up and put them to work. That is good chromium-molybdenum steel in the barrel and receiver on it- and it will blue up nicely with Brownell's Oxpho Blue liquid. I have done a few and they come out looking good.

Have fun with it.

M
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Maudite said:
That's a good looking gun. Excellent wood on it.

These are real good shooters too. I think they are worth the effort to fix them up and put them to work. That is good chromium-molybdenum steel in the barrel and receiver on it- and it will blue up nicely with Brownell's Oxpho Blue liquid. I have done a few and they come out looking good.

Have fun with it.

M
Well, I've done a little reading Brownell's Oxpho Blue. I've never done it before, but you just don't know what you can do till you try it. Besides, the only one I have to please is myself! Still gonna need some trigger work though. After you fire the rifle, the trigger just sorta "dangles" there. As if it's missing a spring or something. At this point in time, repairing the trigger action is above my paygrade. I would try it now, as I'm not abject to pushing my envelope, but I really need to watch someone who knows what their doing, first. Besides, I already have a learning project with the bluing.

BTW, you recommend the liquid over the cream?

Thanks!
 

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I do recommend the liquid over the cream for most applications- but especially the good Chrome-moly steel. If you want to see what it can look like, take a look at Barenjager's model 88. It was down to bare metal in a lot of areas. I put 40+ coats in some spots- 10 coats in others- blended it all to a consistent blue.

Be sure to strip it down clean (degrease) with strong alcohol solution like 97% rubbing alcohol before you start with the blue. When you get it to look like you want- even and deep blue- you need to stop the chemical reaction that makes it blue. I have good results with WD 40.

Its not a hard job to do. Be patient and realize that some spots may need lots of coats and some spots not so many. To get it all even tho, you will probably have to do the whole thing- all of the gun metal.

Have fun.

M
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Well, a few days ago I finished my first re-blue job. Here's a before and after. Don't expect too much, I'm a lousy photog, but it does look better in real life. I can always redo it, but I like it.

before


after


I removed the scope, and added a Skinner Peep sight.
 

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What a cool old gun! I have to wonder what the idea was, back in the day, with the tiny ejection ports? Was FTE more fun in the old days?
 

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I like it too. Both the blue and the wood look real good. Well done! It looks like a new gun.

Thanks for sharing. Enjoy your "new" rifle.

M
 
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