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Lets say you've got yourself a Model 39 of whatever type and vintage and you have already done the basics in getting the best accuracy from it, ie a good cleanig, testing of different .22 rounds, a good piece of glass on top(especially with older eyes like mine!) and such.
From that point, what steps might you take to TRY to wring out better accuracy yet? Regardless of whether you got groups of 1-1/2" or 3/8" at any given range, what would you look to tune to "make gooder" next?
 

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The trigger would get some attention from me. The trigger on my old 39-A had way too heavy a pull for consistent shooting. A good cleaning and very light polishing of the trigger/hammer engagement surfaces with 600 wet/dry automotive paper will take some of the weight off. I'd leave stoning of these surfaces to a competent gunsmith- Marlin lever triggers are easily buggered through over stoning-take too much off and both parts will have to be replaced.

Regards,

Doc Sharptail
 

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I would also choose the trigger on a 39-A and did, some 25 years ago with my own. It wears a Leupold 4x and shoots quite well with the 2 pound trigger pull that it has had over the years. The thing to remember about working on triggers is that "if you don't know what you are doing, don't do anything". With having said that, I'll follow-up with this;

Never attempt to alter the angles on either the sear or the hammer notch. Its acceptable to clean the surfaces up with a bit of light polishing to remove tool marks and such, but not to the extent that angles have been sacrificed. The proper trigger pull is obtained by knowing about spring adjustment or installing spring kits that automatically bring the pull weight down to the desired level. Its always best to leave such work up to a "competent" gunsmith who takes pride in his work and will deliver the requested pull weight by his own application of learned skill and desire to maintain his reputation as a "pro". If a "gunsmith" advises you that he cannot perform the work necessary to bring you a clean, crisp pull weight of whatever poundage you desire, he is NOT competent for that work.
 
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