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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
A conversation of curiosity ...

Other than being post war production, is there anything specific that distinguishes a 36 from a 1936.

I have noted the 36 appears a bit in the rough comparatively. Probably a collection of new and pre-war parts, combined with the trials of post war manufacturing changes.

Are there differences in the features or internal design?

Your collected wisdom is appreciated.
 

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The first four years of the Model 1936 the guns were identical in every aspect. In 1937, they changed the name of the Model 1936 to "Model 36;" however, that would be the only change. There were no changes made to the gun internally or cosmetically. Then in 1941, the flute was taken out of the buttstock, a different style butt plate was added, the main spring went from a leaf type to a coil type; and the forearm was changed from the beavertail style to a perchbelly style. 1941 was also the last year for the case colored receiver, the receivers were all blued after this.

In 1946, the marking on the upper tang was eliminated, and Model 36 was added to the barrel markings. As I stated before, the receivers were now blued. The production of the Model 36 continued through 1947, with a slight carryover into the early part of 1948. In June of 1948, the model was changed. The receiver was re-designed, with the square bolt now changed to a round bolt; hence the beginning of the model 336. Hope this helps!
 

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The first four years of the Model 1936 the guns were identical in every aspect. In 1937, they changed the name of the Model 1936 to "Model 36;" however, that would be the only change. There were no changes made to the gun internally or cosmetically. Then in 1941, the flute was taken out of the buttstock, a different style butt plate was added, the main spring went from a leaf type to a coil type; and the forearm was changed from the perchbelly style to a beavertail style. 1941 was also the last year for the case colored receiver, the receivers were all blued after this.

In 1946, the marking on the upper tang was eliminated, and Model 36 was added to the barrel markings. As I stated before, the receivers were now blued. The production of the Model 36 continued through 1947, with a slight carryover into the early part of 1948. In June of 1948, the model was changed. The receiver was re-designed, with the square bolt now changed to a round bolt; hence the beginning of the model 336. Hope this helps!
Jake, that's very good info on the model 36, but I thought the 1936 to 1940 models had a beavertail forearm, and the perchbelly forearm started in 1941.
 

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Jake, that's very good info on the model 36, but I thought the 1936 to 1940 models had a beavertail forearm, and the perchbelly forearm started in 1941.
Ooops you are right IMR, I flipped it. I'll edit my post to correct that.
 

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Jake, I've often thought that the beavertail forestock was the best looking design of any other Marlin... the perchbelly, the worst.


I'd sure like to run up on a 1936 thru 1940 model 36.
 

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Jake, I've often thought that the beavertail forestock was the best looking design of any other Marlin... the perchbelly, the worst.


I'd sure like to run up on a 1936 thru 1940 model 36.
IMR, I agree with you about the beavertail forestock. I too would love to find a model 1936 in that timeline. I love the looks of the case colored receiver. I do have a 1947 Model 36 in .32WSP that I absolutely love, here is a picture:
IMG_0801.JPG
 

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Jake, that's a beautiful rifle, in mint shape... last of the 36's and in .32WSP makes it an exceptional rifle.
 

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Jake, that's a beautiful rifle, in mint shape... last of the 36's and in .32WSP makes it an exceptional rifle.
Thank you sir, I appreciate that. I love this rifle, and the .32WSP is a caliber very dear to my heart. Thanks for the compliments.
 

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The first four years of the Model 1936 the guns were identical in every aspect. In 1937, they changed the name of the Model 1936 to "Model 36;" however, that would be the only change. There were no changes made to the gun internally or cosmetically. Then in 1941, the flute was taken out of the buttstock, a different style butt plate was added, the main spring went from a leaf type to a coil type; and the forearm was changed from the beavertail style to a perchbelly style. 1941 was also the last year for the case colored receiver, the receivers were all blued after this.

In 1946, the marking on the upper tang was eliminated, and Model 36 was added to the barrel markings. As I stated before, the receivers were now blued. The production of the Model 36 continued through 1947, with a slight carryover into the early part of 1948. In June of 1948, the model was changed. The receiver was re-designed, with the square bolt now changed to a round bolt; hence the beginning of the model 336. Hope this helps!
Close but no cigar.The first variation 1936 made in 1936 was exactly the same on the inside using flat springs as the 1893 did.In 1937 the second variation changed to coil springs.Of course from the outside they appeared the same.Also the original 1936 did not have a Letter prefix in the serial number.
 

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Jake, that is a beautiful rifle. Here's mine from 1945 which was scoped in the late 60's, 30-30. Excellent deer rifle.
Bill
 

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Jake, that is a beautiful rifle. Here's mine from 1945 which was scoped in the late 60's, 30-30. Excellent deer rifle.
Bill
That's a beautiful rifle you have there yourself as well!
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 · (Edited)
The first four years of the Model 1936 the guns were identical in every aspect. In 1937, they changed the name of the Model 1936 to "Model 36;" however, that would be the only change.
I don't suppose I've closely examined more than a dozen pre-war 1936s in my lifetime, so I haven't seen enough of them around to make a true study of it. I realize they were called the model 36, but weren't they all stamped "Model 1936" before WWII and stamped "Model 36" after the war? I have seen some old catalog pages referencing them as model 36s before the war, but I don't ever remember seeing a prewar rifle marked with just a 36. Is that correct?

I enjoy discussing the history of firearms as much as collecting and shooting them.

Thanks for the discussion.
 
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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Jake, that is a beautiful rifle. Here's mine from 1945 which was scoped in the late 60's, 30-30. Excellent deer rifle.
Bill
Nice Rifle. Did you jewel the bolt yourself?
 

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Nice Rifle. Did you jewel the bolt yourself?
The bolt was already jeweled when I got the rifle in the mid 60's. I think it looks goods but others would say no. I kinda like it as it makes it stand out.
 

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Was just wondering when Marlin resumed using the trademark bullseye in the stocks. My 1936's do not have them, but a recently adopted 36 (D prefix) does. Thanks!
 

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IMR, I agree with you about the beavertail forestock. I too would love to find a model 1936 in that timeline. I love the looks of the case colored receiver. I do have a 1947 Model 36 in .32WSP that I absolutely love, here is a picture:
View attachment 103069
That might be one of the best looking Marlins I've ever seen. A real beaut!
 

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That might be one of the best looking Marlins I've ever seen. A real beaut!
Thank you SC Reb, it is my favorite of the Marlins that I own.
 

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Have a 1947 that I don't know if it had a bulls eye or not. The stock was cut so short it was not there. I replaced the stock and narrowed the fore stock.

As bought

As is today.

In transition.
 

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