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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Okay, how many of us have well used 1893s with a wee bit of extra headspace? Wisner makes locking bolts for 1894 Winchesters in 4 sizes: Standard, .005", .010", and .015". Does anyone know of a similar setup for our beloved Marlins? What, exactly, gives way over time to allow the headspace to increase? Does the receiver stretch? Does the metallurgy of the bolt allow it to compress? Does the locking bolt compress? In my locker, the most excessive headspace is in my 1920 Savage in 250-3000. Is it a quality issue, or did someone shoot the hell out of my rifle? Hmmm.......any theories?
 

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I don't have an 1893 with headspace issues, but I've seen them. On the one I worked on, the locking bolt, and the bolt notch both seemed to show signs of wear, so I guess this could be the same with others. I put a mic on the two bearing surfaces, and adjacent areas, and could detect measureable amounts of wear. It's been too long ago to recall what it was, but I had the surface of the locking bolt built up, and ground/stoned down. After I did this, I ended up finding a good locking bolt, and installed it. The end result was less headspace, but still not perfect, as I was afriad to mess with the bolt notch.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Hi MM93,
I figured as much. About twenty years ago I made the same inquiry with a well known 'smith in California and was told the same thing. By the way, I am finally in the last stage with my Precision Gun Works buttstock for my Grade "B". I had one 'gotcha' when I fit the 'S' buttplate, but managed to work it out. I am using Tru-Oil and should be down to the last application and a final buffing with 0000 steel wool. I learned a few good lessons with my first project! Also, that Hepburn rifle of yours is a jewel! Was it originally a 45-70, or was it a bare receiver when you got it?
 

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Hi RW,
Hope we get to see pictures when it's done! I love nice wood, but I sure don't enjoy doing the fitting. Finishing is OK, but I still prefer metal working to wood. Seems my fumble fingers can't screw up the metal work as easily. I tend to be too impatient to do it right.
I did find a good trick that a friend showed me! (who is good at stock work) He fits them so close, they rarely need this trick, but it sure helped on mine. He gets the stock as close to perfcet fit as possible, and then uses Micro Bed to seat the stocks into the metal. He applies paste wax to all the parts, and putty to all the areas where he doesn't want MB to get into. After it sets for a few hours, he removes the wood, before it completely sets up. Then he does the final shaping to bring it all down close to the metal. Before shaping, he uses painter's tape to cover metal surfaces, if he isn't going to refinish the metal.
In the case of my Hepburn that wasn't an issue, so I worked the wood with it in place on the metal. This is a lot easier, and it makes the two surfaces perfectly matched. I ended up hand polishing the metal after the stocks were done, which left the wood just perceptively higher than the metal. I like that a bit better, as it allows for future repairs, if needed.
The Hepburn came to me as a complete action, and a barrel, but it's a Badger barrel, and not the original. I had no idea what the original caliber was, and would have picked another caliber, if I hadn't gotten the barrel in the deal. Not that I don't like the .45-70; it's one of my favorites! But I've got 6 others in that caliber, so I would have chosen differently, if I bought a barrel. Money made the choice this time; or should I say a lack of money? :D
 

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Roundsworth said:
I am using Tru-Oil and should be down to the last application and a final buffing with 0000 steel wool.
Hey Roundsworth - They make Tru-Oil in a spray can - speeds things up for the final coat or two. Tends to level out a little better than swabbin it on. Just FYI.

Shum8
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I, too, was quite apprehensive about the final shaping. I also left the wood a tad higher. My major concern was the fact that wood can easily be removed, but not so easy to replace! Unfortunately, the purty stock makes the rest of my well used 1893 look pale in comparison. Well, it needed new wood, and this was a good first project.

My local sporting goods emporium did not have the spray Tru-Oil. I used it about 25 years ago, and I will readily agree about the leveling factor.
 
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