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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello, I am a brand new Marlin owner. This rifle is in very poor condition, it looks like
it has been sitting in a barn for the last 100 years. Ultimately, I am excited to own a piece
Of history and would like to bring this back to life. I am not looking to get rich off of this thing
(Which I don't think it's worth much any ways due to condition), but I don't want to start refinishing this
Rifle and "mess" up the value of this rifle. I ran the serial
Number and it came back that it was manufactured in 1890. I had another member help me out with the model,
Im pretty sure it is a model 1889. It says it's a Marlin Safety #33582 caliber .38 W. Inscription on top says -Marlin Fire-Co. New Haven. CT U.S.A
PATENTED OCT.11 1887.APRIL 2 1889

Not going to sell this, but would like to bring it back to life, that is my hobby! Any information or suggestions would be very appreciated,
Thanks!
1405561210054.jpg
 

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What a great project subject! please post photos as you move through the renovation. The hardest part will likely be breaking it down into all the parts assuming that most of the screws are probably rusted tight. Try to get the wood off before you soak the metal parts for too long in Kroil or other suggested solutions mentioned here. The wood looks pretty solid and not too dented or cracked, maybe a good murphies oil soap cleaning and bringing it back to life with BLO would make it look alive again. Go slowly and carefully with a good set of screw drivers that FIT and use plenty of penetrating type oil and plenty of soaking time to try to loosen the threads. Hopefully the internals aren't a solid block of rust and the bore is salvageable. This was probably a black powder gun so the barrel is likely not the best. I envy your project, wish I had stumbled across this one; a really great retirement project! Let us know if you find anything tucked away under the butt plate or such, many old timers his interesting things in strange places. I found a 1931 ( I think) great uncle's trapping license under a friend's inherited Remington pump .22 a few years ago. He has that family heirloom on display between plates of glass. You just never know.......
 

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The gun is on the brown side, but most of us here, have seen a lot worse.

What Burk offers sounds very correct to me. Go easy on the Murhpys, or cut it back with water, it can remove way too much real quick if allowed to soak. Stay away from heavy steel wool or any kind of sandpaper for sure. Let the Kroil or what ever really soak into the metal before any scrubbing, which a stiff tootbrush will remove a lot of.

Nice honest gun.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thank you guys for your input! I will definetly do up dates... I can't wait to get this little piece of history shinning again!
 

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No steel wool coarser than 0000, and go with a light touch. The original finish on the stock and forearm, by the way, is varnish, not oil.
Take that into consideration when you clean the wood. Also, you may want to measure the barrel's length; my eyes may be off (they're 75 years old), but that barrel looks to me to be longer than the standard 24 inches. If it is, it will add some value to your gun. RGR and Burk pretty well summed things up...
 

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Take that into consideration when you clean the wood. Also, you may want to measure the barrel's length; my eyes may be off (they're 75 years old), but that barrel looks to me to be longer than the standard 24 inches. If it is, it will add some value to your gun. RGR and Burk pretty well summed things up...
Good eyes Mike! It appears to be a 26" barrel. Might even be a bit longer.

The gun appears to still have a fair amount of original varnish, and if it does I'd want to retain as much of it as possible. I agree with RGR that you should proceed cautiously with the stocks, and avoid over cleaning them! The gun isn't a bad specimen, and I'd want to clean all of it, without over cleaning, or stripping it.
 
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You guys are right, on third look, I think it may be a "trap" barrel too.:)

Its often amazing, on how good a bore can turn out to be, even if the rest of the gun is a bit neglected. But an early gun like that, using a B P round, all bets are off.

I know a home could be found here locally either way.:biggrin:
 
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I appreciate all of your input, it has been very helpful. The guy I acquired this rifle from did not know any thing
About it, except it looked old..lol. I have a german Mauser restoration just about done, as soon as that is wrapped
I am jumping into this project. I am going to measure the barrel when I get home and run abore light down to see how bad the
Corrosion is. I will keep you all updated.
 

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Can't wait to see more pics and watch this unfold!! Good luck on the journey!!
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Good to know thnx guys.. she keeps getting better and better...I've got a main spring to replace, any suggestions on quality internal parts replacement company's...I've used Numerich in the past, and was very satisfied by their service and quality. But would like to get the highest quality available, thnx
 

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What a great project. I'm glad it's being rescued by someone that apprieciates it's history.
 
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Hopefully you wont need internal parts, as the 1889 parts are not readily available. You've had better luck with Numriich than I have! I avoid them if at all possible.
 

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Numrich has always shipped more or less on time, but they rarely have anything that is all that uncommon. I find them always worth a look, but never hold my breath, thats for sure.

I notice a lot of newer gun guys, dont quite comprehend just how difficult it can be to source gun parts. cripes, even more modern guns, its a pain in the butt to find them.
 
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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
All goes well! Gun is apart, wood off and ready to deep clean. I will need to replace the main spring. All screws came out with a good soak...and barrel seems to be in better condition then I had hoped for. Now for the hard part... figuring out what direction I am going to go! Good ol' bluing? My specialty.. duracoat? A good glassy varnish on the stock? So many options. Would love to know what you guys think! 1406071145909.jpg
 

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All goes well! Gun is apart, wood off and ready to deep clean. I will need to replace the main spring. All screws came out with a good soak...and barrel seems to be in better condition then I had hoped for. Now for the hard part... figuring out what direction I am going to go! Good ol' bluing? My specialty.. duracoat? A good glassy varnish on the stock? So many options. Would love to know what you guys think! View attachment 112307
Suugest you not go nuts refinishing this gun, especially with the non-standard barrel. A cleaning of the metal with 0000 steel wool, oil and a light touch will preserve the patina. A simple wipe down of the wood with a soft cloth lightly treated with mineral spirits
may clean stock and forearm nicely.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Mike leck, thank you. I will definetly heed your warning. I will definetly respect any advice I get from you folks. This is my first marlin and I want it done correct.
 
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