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Thought there was an earlier post asking about this subject but did not find it. I just saw an interesting MinWax product at Home Depot - WOOD HARDENER. Seems to be a thin, penetrating product that sets up and hardens soft, damaged wood, and strengthens as well. Many applications increase the effect. In an earlier post on a similar area I mentioned a Marine product called 'GET ROT' that sounds similar. This sounds like a product that may salvage oil soaked, softened wood after getting the oil out. Just throwin' this one out there. AC
 

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Don't know about gun wood but I live in an old house built in 1922. If it wasn't for Minwax Wood Hardner It prolly wouldn't be standing today.

Termites hate it:marchmellow:
 

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Anyone use this stuff on a gun stock? I've got one that's driving me nuts. The instructions say the wood can't be oily and that might be a problem with this stock. Every time I refinish with either poly or acrylic the finish stays tacky!
 

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Is it a methyl or cyano acrylate? (super glue variant)
 
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All kinds. Enamored of their mechanisms!
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Is it a methyl or cyano acrylate? (super glue variant)
I know the 'Git Rot' product I've used was an epoxy two part that appeared to be thinned to a watery consistency. A biologist where I used to work explained the the molecular chains of wood and epoxyies are compatible, whereas polyester chains are not compatible with wood at all. That is why folks, including several big name boatbuilders have serious issues with wood inserts and stringers delaminating from the fiberglass. Polyester resins are much cheaper and a fraction of the strength of epoxies. AC
 

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I know the 'Git Rot' product I've used was an epoxy two part that appeared to be thinned to a watery consistency. A biologist where I used to work explained the the molecular chains of wood and epoxyies are compatible, whereas polyester chains are not compatible with wood at all. That is why folks, including several big name boatbuilders have serious issues with wood inserts and stringers delaminating from the fiberglass. Polyester resins are much cheaper and a fraction of the strength of epoxies. AC
yup, but the potential downfall to the git-rot is that it is not moisture insensitive, and can have potential, adverse catalization issues if there are oils in the wood... it is designed for DRY rotted, and porous wood. it has a very extended pot life, and soaks in very far.

Epoxied are 100% solids material, and are 100% waterproof. Whereas polyesters are solvent based, and technically considered porous, not 100% waterproof..

I have soaked oily woods in a denatured alcohol bath to help remove as much oil as I could, sometimes under vacuum, let dry out, then treat. The crazy glue trick is a really good one, perfect for small areas, and very permanent, (Ive made many a wood fishing lure and coated/protected the wood with that method).. but messy and stinks to high heaven.
 

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I think the stock I'm working with may have been suspended in diesel for a while! I've soaked it in an acetone bath for several days and also an alcohol one also. It extracted several teaspoons of oil. I also placed it in a warm oven for several hours and eventually had no more oil coming to the surface. It's now been stripped again and a different poly put on but is still tacky after 24 hours (dry time supposed to be 2 to 3 hours). I thought the hardener might improve the chances of better adhesion and drying but simply don't know if the possible residual oil will interfere?
 

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Hmm. if you think she's good and contaminant free, the only things I can see keeping the epoxy sticky would beDouble checking that its oil free again, then the other culprit would be the epoxy.
Epoxies really need to be mixed accurately to their ratios. adding more hardner will absolutely not let it harden faster and work.. just the opposite...set up fast, but stay sticky, and like rubber/silicone forever.. these results are even more pronounced in smaller batches that we would be mixing.

an easy test of this would be to examine the mixing pot, and see how it has cured... same as stock, then somethings up with the epoxy... if its hard as a rock, then you will know to look at the stock, and in other directions. something I have always done given the opportunity is to pour out a small dollop the size of a quarter on a flat surface, let it run and settle on its own gravity, leave it right next to the work piece, and use it as the reference piece... same environment, and conditions...

heres a long post, but not so un-common mistake my employees would mix their batches for touchups in small graduated cups so they could measure accurately by pouring each component in on top of each other to avoid mistakes... (that way worked the best...) BUT.... they would use a large popsickle stick with a large radious to mix, but the cup had an almost squared corner in the bottom.. they pour in the A which is very thick, then the catalyst on top of it to the right line, then stir... but the stick didnt get all of the mix down in the corner, leaving a good bit of the A side not getting mixed in, so in essence, they were getting an improper mix with too much B side...
Mix til clear, or no swirls or discolorations, get into the bottom of the pot corners, scrape the sides, then do it again.... if you want a little more pot life, cool down the resin side about 5 degrees lower than the environment it will be applied in. that will help also...
 

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I have a medium size double decker barn that could use hardening. I was thinking of replacing the soft boards with cypress, but if they can be restored inexpensively I would go that route. I would probably need 10 gallons to start. Would it be cheaper to replace the lumber? Screen Shot 2014-07-21 at 14.20.10.png
 
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more than likely.
 

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Just an update. I didn't wind up using the hardner as my poly finally dried tack free. Took a little more than 24 hours though, instead of the 2 to 3 hours the directions indicated. I was using the Minwax Wipe-on Poly in satin finish. I had used the gloss version before and really liked it. I had thought that the satin would be easier and more forgiving to apply than the gloss. Wrong. For some reason the satin gave me a much harder time getting a good final coat than the gloss did. It just seemed to be harder to get an even and complete coat with it. I will probably use it again but will have to figure out a better way to apply it for a good final coat.
 
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