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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm thinking of putting up a metal building next year for a shop - workspace. It will be about 20'x30' and I'd like to do most of the work myself if possible. I've done some basic research and the variety of buildings and construction methods is enormous. I could borrow a backhoe but any bigger equipment would have a tough time accessing the site. I'm in the California mountains and the building will have to support a heavy snow load. The foundation would be a concrete slab with 18" footings. I've got a friend who's done a lot of concrete work so I'm not worried about that. Any feed back on this project would be helpfull, good - bad experiences - what to look for etc.. Thanks in advance!
 

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Around here we build Pole Buildings. We use 6 X 6 Pressure Treated Posts and set them in the ground sitting on a simple Footer, eliminating the need for a Foundation. After the Building is built, you can then pour the Concrete Floor.

...just as a possible alternative for you.

Bill
 

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hey im with you on doing most of the construction work by yourself. i put in a 40x60 building years ago and i had an engineer do the foundation plan for me and it was money well spent. in kalifornia i would think you have to have a building permit. i helped a commercial electrician wire it and that worked out good also. it seemed like the wind load calculation was a big deal. go for it!
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Pole buildings are out. Fireproof is the key and I do not want a gravel floor. I wnat to be snug and warm when the snow flies
 

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Pole buildings are a great way to achieve what you want. Many in this part of the country put up pole buildings, insulate and finish them like houses, and use them for weekend or hunting camp cabins. I don't know the codes for outside Missouri but if you expect a heavy snow load it would be my guess your building will require something more along the lines of 3' pilings and/or foundation preparation.

Before you dismiss pole buildings you might want to do a search on them when used as finished buildings. And as 336 fan mentioned, you pour the floor after the building is up. They really offer a lot more opportunity for the do it yourself project. The building can be put up by professionals if need be, then all the other work can be done in the warm dry structure like wiring, plumbing, hanging sheet rock, etc. You can even move in to some degree while doing the DIY work.
 
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The first job I ever had after I got out of government contract work was working for a company that had the contract for ATT putting up metal buildings for them and we did a few 20x30 in the northern Appalachians on the east side, a couple in the northern Rockies and a few in Montana and the Dakotas. I will advise that you get a company with dang good reviews. But if you are planning to do all the work yourself and you are going with a all metal building then I would research this real good especially if you will be building in a heavy snow area then you need someone to calculate how much support you will need for the roof and sides and if the roof is built with a standard pitch for a metal building like this

images.jpg

Then you need to make sure it can take the weight of heavy snow. I hate to hear on here your roof collapse. If you are planning doing all the work your self then you will need a small crane to plus a portable generator and portable compressor. If you have neighbors in the area with metal buildings the size you are wanting to build talk to them and see if you can inspect theirs to see how they are structulery built and ask how they handle the heavy snow and such.
 
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Ditto on mj's comments. A building with attic storage takes a lot more structural strength than one without. Even the weight of sheet rock makes a difference. My preference was to have a local company put up the shell and I finished it inside as I wanted, and as I had the time and $$.
 
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when i built my cabin in the u. p. of michigan i got a book from midwest plan service,ames iowa, designs for glued trusses. it was under $10.00 and has truss designs from 20 to 60 feet. it gives tables for snow, dead, and wind loads. if you use pressure treated lumber you must use fasteners that won't rust from the salt in the wood they use now to preserve it. you must also put felt paper between your siding and the pressure treated wood.
 

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I own a construction business. Give me a call and I can do a couple rundown estimates for you on a couple different styles of buildings for you. Lots of different ways to do it. Just depends on what you want the outside and inside to look like in order to select which style of building you should go with. PM me and I can shoot you my number. I hate trying to convey things in writing:) I'm a talking type of person.
 

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I have made a 30x50 metal building. The only professionals I have hired is to set a proper foundation and for electric works. It hardly take 2-3 weeks to complete whole metal buildings denver structure. All the primary steel is pre-welded, pre-cut and pre-punched for easy installation. The toughest part is to bolt the beams together.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Thanks for all the replies. There is a local contractor who specializes in metal buildings so I'll be looking into what he can do. I know there are a lot of options out there - it'll be my winter research project.
 

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Do some research. You have waymore options than just metalbuildings. Earth wall using sand filled bags as a start, cord wood, slip form concrete stabilized mud, high pressure pressed adobe, old fashion adobe, straw bale. There's more I'm sure.
 

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I very most recently built a steel framed shop....still finishing the interior....what I built was...30x48x14'6" (at interior peak) I used Allied Steel....product & material were 1st class...sheeting is 24 gauge...C/S was good while designing/ordering...but never heard boo or go to hell after that...for granted this was a steel/insulated shop for a total of $15300/shipped...the steel pkg weighed 9800# when delivered...the R19 insulation pkg was another 1200#..I had the footings/2' stemwalls/floor poured a month or so prior to starting the framing...Had 2-3 other guys help me frame & sheet it...what a job....used a mini Deere track hoe to set beams which worked great..did I say 'what a job ?' I would not do anything different on design...2' stemwalls above finished floor is a must...I have just short of $15K in the grading/footings/walls/6"floors & rebar..along with a 48x22x6" apron in front of the two O/H doors..another $4K...money well spent....as for more money..2 Martin insulated O/H doors..16' and 10' both 8' tall....the two openers..then the wiring....me and another buddy did that...getting ready for a U-tube nat gas infared heater very soon......mfg by Space Ray..50K BTU...I beefed up the R19 insulation in walls...adding R4 rigid against the R19..then framing 2x4 walls 8' tall and adding R13 batts between studs then screwing 4x8 OSB on the walls & priming/painted white...while wiring I added a 56" reversible ceiling fan in the 16' bay 4' from the ceiling peak...w/o any heat so far...our 12-14* nights the garage interior has only dropped to 45*...2 portable Mr Buddy propane heaters will bring it up to 58-59* in 3-4 hrs...I still have to finish framing the other half of the walls yet the same.....been a big project....some fun & easy...some ball busting work.....my suggestions....shop around...get heavy 24 gauge sheeting....NOT 29 or less...use a stem wall above grade....5-6" floors with bar....plan ahead........30' deep is great having a full size 2500HD Chev crew cab...plenty of room to walk around it on either end...my plan is to build a 12x14 interior framed room between the bays....mancave/reload room...roof has a 3/12 pitch...4/12 was much more....more beams/engineering ?? good luck......
 

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I've just finished a round of pricing out a 40'x40' building -- options were (1) two shipping containers, (2) pole barn, (3) metal frame building and (4) metal self-supporting building kit.

The "self-supporting" (improved Quonset huts) was the most expensive but they would put it together.

The metal-framed building was most reasonable and could be designed to take your snow load.

Pole barn was down the list due to appearance but in our case may win.

Insulation isn't a big problem here but the metal-framed buildings have insulation packs available that might make it a much warmer place to work.

Agree strongly with comment about getting the building up and in the dry so you can then insulate, wire, plumb, pour floor,etc etc without worrying about weather.
 
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