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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have everything I need and man it surprised me at just how much there is.
if theres anyone interested please just send me a PM or tell me where you'll send the messages.
I'll be keeping my eyes on my inbox. I am really looking forward to this. And if there is someone that has the
patients then all the better.lol Thank you in advance, I'm looking forward to it.
 

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Perhaps you should explain a little more clearly what it is you need. This forum in general is essentially a "mentor" for all things Marlin.
 

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Perhaps you should explain a little more clearly what it is you need. This forum in general is essentially a "mentor" for all things Marlin.
:dito:

There are plenty of folks to help you around Marlin Owners, but we need some idea of what kind of mentoring you're looking for. Be it for all things Marlin, or reloading, shooting in general, archery, do-it-yourself stuff, and the list goes on and on. We have a huge cross-section of folks with sound working knowledge of just about anything that can be done. I reckon we need to get a handle on what you're needing first, then we can point you in a general direction.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Sorry guys, was quite tired and somewhat out of it.

I need some help reolading for my marlin 336-308me. It took me a long time to get all of the reloading gear I needed.
I'll also be reloading for the .243 win savage bolt action.
I have a RCBS single stage press, scale, powder trickler, calipers, powder funnel, caseing lube, the dies for both calibers.
I was hoping to get some info on loading data and whats worked for others here. I also have accurate powder 4350 and 4064.
Can't find much else as far as powders go.
Any help would be appreciated.
 

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Hey Stephenn,

Good job, so far.

Seems you have most of the needful item. (you may want to put a case trimmer, primer pocket and flash hole uniformer on the list)

Get several manuals. (used are fine).

Bullet makers manuals tend to "feature" bullets made by that maker. (Nosler, H'Day....etc)

Manuals from powder makers and reloading purveyors tend to use a "broader" selection of bullets. (Lee, Hodgon, Lyman.....etc)

Some (H'Day comes to mind) actually use a "real" firearm (not a test barrel) on a "real" range. (H'Day has an indoor 200 yd range, that they test on).

Others just use test barrels, with pressure sensing devices. With no recommendations to real world accuracy.

Hope this helps.

(Oh, BLC II and H 380 are excellent powder choices for the .243)

Later, Mark
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I have the speer reloading manual #14.
I've read it extensively and studied it alot. It does not have the 308 marlin express data tho.
I have reloaded a few rounds for my .243win. The grouping was nice but the casings were very dirty with powder.
I believe I had too slow powder and too light of a bullet. I used accurate 4350 with 55gr bullet.
Since I've bought some 87gr v-max hornadys. Although I would still like to work up a load with the 55gr I have.

I do have the case trimmer and primer pocket cleaners. I have all of the equipment needed. I'm sorry for not just saying that in the begining. Seems like I'm making this harder than it needs to be.
 
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Hey Stephenn,

No problem (we are all "guilty as charged") LOL

H 4350 is an excellent powder...............for cases based on the 30-06 case. .270, 25-06.............etc.

Hard to get "enough" of it "in" a case based on the .308. (for "top" performance) .243, .22-250 (I know the 250-3000, case capacity is similar to the .308), 7mm-08...etc.

Take a look at this Burn Rate (for ease of use, go with the Rx "series" and those powders "nearest". i.e., Rx 7/4198 for the 45/70, "fast" rifle powders. Rx 15/Varget, a bit "slower", ideal for the .308 "family" of cases. Rx 17/H 4350, about the "slowest" useful reloading powders for the 30-06 "family" of cases, and many "magnum rifle" rounds)

Powders "slower" than this, are generally used for bottle necked magnum rounds, having huge case capacities.

A bit of history. H 380 was the Mil/surp .308 powder. BLC II was and exceptionally accurate "blend", used in the LC Match Ammo, of the '70's. Both powders perform well in cases of that "capacity/pressure" range. As does Varget...........etc.

Hope some of this helps. (Clear as mud?) LOL

Later, Mark
 

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You're on the right track - - like others have mentioned, get as many different sources of info as you can afford... They all have useful info, and make for great general reading, IMO. Once you get the general idea of what needs to be done, and need help answering your questions or just some help refining your loading, slip on into the "Reloading" section and fire away with the questions.

It won't take you long to cross-reference info that you get here with your loading manuals (I highly recommend doing that, regardless of the sources of personal info you get from the 'net) so you can come up with safe, reliable, and effective loads for your firearms.
 

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Might as well throw my two in here... Over the years I've found the Nosler manuals to be most helpful, especially during times of component shortages. They list the most accurate loads with each powder listed, and I've found that they're very close if not right on the money about 95% of the time for my rifles. Generally, but not always, their "most accurate" loads are the lower charges, so I can try that load to get a very good idea if the rifle likes that powder. Their data is often more conservative than other manuals, so take that into consideration. It is ALWAYS best to get at least two opinions on max charges even if you have to go to the powder manufacturers web site for the data. And NEVER take a load off the net without checking at least one manual, as mentioned before. In any case, get the Nosler #7 manual; it will save you money in the long run.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Thank you for the info guys. I have wanted the nosler manual and I'll get it now to double check the speer manual.
Once I get a load for the 308 ME and the .243win I'll post them on the reloading forums for any details I might have missed,
or just to check with other reloaders here.
Thanks again. Oh by the way sorry again for the very poorly written first post of mine.lol
 
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Stephenn,

Send me a P.M. with your personal "E" address and I'll send you a document that I get a lot of requests for.

No cost and no obligation.

As per mentoring, I greatly enjoy passing on what I think I know about what I think I know, so your welcome to ask away once we make contact.

Always better if your close enough to share a cup of coffee and time at the loading bench, but there is lots of good people and info available here.

Crusty Deary Ol'Coot
 

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Stephenn, I would make the purchase of a decent powder measure a fairly high priority. A cheap subsitute is the Lee dipper set. Best is buying used in good condition. In powder measures, the only acceptable use of plastic is in the hopper and drop tube. Half of my measures were 'previously owned', but still perform. Just my $.02
 

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re: plastic in powder measures. In my opinion, there is one exception to this... The Lee, which was useful for measuring the "log powders" such as 4831. And frankly, that's the only use I had for one of the flimsy critters. Since I seldom use the "logs" any more, I sold mine years ago and haven't missed it...
 

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Personally, unless a person is planning to load handgun ammo, I'd not rush right out to buy a powder measure.

Even if I'm loading a lot of rifle ammo, I usually just dip the charges into the scale pan with my set of Lee dippers, which is in my opinion one of the better Lee products. OR if using a measure, measure into the scale pan with a charge planned to be slightly on the low side and then bring the charge weight up to the proper level with the dippers.

I know there is the debate as to rifle loads being equally accurate if "thrown" with a good measure, but being an Ol'Coot I still use the scale for any rifle loads of importance.

I also use a lot of extruded powders, or "logs" as some refer to that powder, and I'd not want a powder measure that was not up to repeated cutting of the powder kernels which means no plastic in the drum and measuring chamber.

I have a powder measure and may soon use it to thrown some "reduced" 30/06 practice loads with Red Dot for a young friend, but other then about a year ago when I did this, the measure seldom gets used.

For the handgun loads, I find the RCBS "Little Dandy" to be faster and handier until I get to the magnum loads.

So, all that to say that a measure would be of much less importance then a good scale and depending on the direction your hand loading takes you, possibility not needed until later.

Crusty Deary Ol'Coot
 

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Try to get the paperback Lyman's reloading manual - it is excellent - stay away from Lee's manual - you might also want to watch on youtub on how to set up dies and and and actual reloading - be sure to double ck. brass before final loading procedure of setting the bullet to make sure you did not double charge - also only have one powder out ( the one you are using on loading table)
 

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Forgot to add be carefull and make sure you keep primers separate and in their boxes - all large primers look the same and small primers look the same wether pistol, rifle, regular or magnum- they can give different pressures and burn differently. As long as you follow the reloading manuals you will be OK - you will normally find the most accurate loads are in the middle range - remember accuracy counts is more important then a little more velocity - BE VERY CAREFUL WHEN YOU APPROACH MAXIMUM LOADS - THEY ARE VERY HARD ON YOUR WEAPON AND NOT NEEDED.
 

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Forest Hunter brings up a good point, accuracy and at what pressure level will that occur.

I have had a different experience then he, finding in many centerfire rifles, - 45/70 being an exception - that my best groups are at or near the max listed loads.

This is why a person needs to do a proper load work up/test with your own firearm, as each is a rule unto itself and may very well react differently.

BE safe and enjoy!

Crusty Deary Ol'Coot
 
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