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Going to start making my own at some point soon. I don't need anything fancy. I have about 8 gallons of WW's and will start researching the molds at some point. For a melter wondered if this seems like a decent setup for the price?

https://www.midwayusa.com/product/1010226026?pid=277310

I will plan on looking for mold recommendations and alloy mixtures as time goes on.
 
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get an old cast iron pot and a Coleman stove or propane turkey cooker burner or barbecue grill burner to smelt and flux the stuff and pour the fluxed/cleaned silver stream into some sort of ingot mold, an old corn shaped muffin mold works great if you don't buy a lee, Lyman or rcbs ingot mold. then a lee bottom pour pot is the least expensive and most effective to use. I have been using the smaller lee bottom pour for 20+ years and its still works great. go to the thrift store and get a few stainless steel things the more heavy duty they are the better---do not use aluminum anything when melting lead--- a ladel, a large slotted spoon and a large cooking spoon to pull the dross, steel and crud out of the fluxing pot and to dip out the liquid lead into ingot mold-- a pair of welding gloves from harbor freight will protect your hands well.
this is about the least expensive way to get started and have stuff that will work well for what you want to do.
you don't have to spend money on flux when sawdust is the best stuff to flux bullet alloy with. a pair of dikes is also helpful to tell which wheel weights are lead alloy and which are zinc-- you do not want to melt zinc into a pot of lead alloy.
 

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I will ad that mp molds is having a 20pecent off sale and you will never regret the purchase of one of Miha's pieces of art.

welcome to the world of bullet casting. a hobby in its own right that I find as rewarding as reloading or shooting

I posted a message here about a wealth of free info I found online that includes an excellent book about casting bullets
 

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The pot you linked to is a good one. You'll have to ask yourself what you'll be casting, and what type of production you need. At the end of the day, nothing will beat the precision and repeatability of pouring your bullets with a ladle, especially BIG bullets. Nothing beats the speed and production of a bottom pour and a multi-cavity mold. A skilled caster with a ladle can almost compete with a bottom pour caster, so keep that in mind. It's not rocket science. I bottom pour most things, but because my interest is starting to lean towards BPCR, and big long heavy bullets, I'm transitioning to ladle pour.

My only major recommendation here is to buy the biggest pot you can afford, and do not melt down and clean up your wheel weights in your bullet casting pot. Use something separate for that.

Just be warned, this is highly addicting, and it will lead to more and more firearms purchases and all things that revolve around casting. It's a slippery slope covered in crisco.
IMG_1823.jpeg
 

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No experience with that unit but it seems on the small side. Doesn't take long to empty a lead pot, especially when casting large slugs or multi-cavity molds. I started with a Coleman camp stove but did not like pouring with a ladle. Moved up to a Lee Pro 20 bottom pour and used that to cast tons of bullets over the years. Grew tired of the constant dripping and bought a RCBS Pro Melt a couple years ago. Regardless of which direction you go have fun and remember that like anything else gun related, casting is addictive. Have fun and stay safe!
 

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Also remember, with the big pots (20 pound and higher) if you get a bottom pour, you can dip or pour. You're not limited to either. Definitely buy the best you can afford for now.
 

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Going to start making my own at some point soon. I don't need anything fancy. I have about 8 gallons of WW's and will start researching the molds at some point. For a melter wondered if this seems like a decent setup for the price?

https://www.midwayusa.com/product/1010226026?pid=277310

I will plan on looking for mold recommendations and alloy mixtures as time goes on.
You do realize smelting and casting are two different things right? You don't want to smelt in your casting pot. You can, but it's not a good idea.
For casting, I would go with a 20 lb lee bottom pour.
For smelting, get a med/large cast iron pot and a coleman stove or turkey burner.
For molds, lee work great if you want simple range bullets (non-hollow point). A good six cavity Lee will produce a lot of nice bullets.
 

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edcknives -
I started casting with a Lyman 10 lb. pot in 1973 - it's still working for me. Hand dipping is my preferred method for casting.
When I needed a larger capacity, I went with the Lee 20 lb. bottom pour. I never could get the hang of casting with that pot and converted it for dipping. I have a 2nd Lee 20 lb. w/o the bottom pour feature.
I use a Coleman stove and old cast iron pot to prepare alloy.
The Lyman 10 lb. pot serves my needs for #2 alloy hard bullets (bottleneck rifle calibers).
One Lee 20 lb. is for 20/1 black powder cast bullets (for Sharps 45-70 and Winchester '73 44-40) and the other is for hand gun bullets (made from range scrap blended with WW). I dip for all my casting - your mileage may vary.
Be sure to work in a well ventilated spot and employ the proper safety equipment.
Casting your own bullets is an addicting addition to reloading your own ammo - relax and enjoy the ride!

WYT-P
Skyhunter
 

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excellent, hope you enjoy casting and shooting your own. I have been trying to give it up for twenty plus years. Failed. Lots to learn and guys here know thier stuff. Dont be put off if they come out badly at first, and dont get over confident if they come out fine from the start. A good pair of leather gloves, the hardware store sort, eye protection and unless well vetilated, a mask.
 
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I'd get a larger pot and preferably a bottom pour. When you start casting large boolits, you'll run out of alloy quickly and will be constantly recharging the pot
 

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I am a ladle guy. My method of casting is not compatible with bottom pour.
I also had a bottom dump the melted contents out. I do not know what I did but it was a mess. I tore it apart and cleaned everything and never had it happen again.
 
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