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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
There is an interesting Marlin Model 94 for sale on www.gunbroker.com and the auction # is 18255035. There is something in picture #4 that tells the history of this rifle. What is it? Parley

By the way MM93 is not allowed to play this time. :wink: I know he knows the answer. Hehehe.
 

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I'm going to take a wild guess here -
I don't know where I remember this from, as I can't find it in any of my secret Marlin files -
but here goes...

I think what you are asking about is the groove milled into the bottom of the receiver. I believe that Model 1894 receiver started it's life out as a Musket, but before it could leave the factory as a Musket, for one reason or another (possibly slow sales of the Muskets ?) it was converted back to some configuration of rifle. The Musket sling stud was milled off the receiver before the conversion was complete.

WB
 

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Great guess Wishbone! I'm sure that's what Parley is looking for on this one. Another thing common to all these converted muskets is the calibers. They are always chambered for either .38-40, or .44-40, as they share the same bolt face and no muskets were offered in the smaller two calibers. In addition all these converted receivers were leftover from unpurchased musket orders, so they fall into the same time frame, as to markings. Most fall into the 1920's era, and carry "Corporaton" marked barrels, and all have their own unique serial number size and range. To date they are all larger serial number size, and 3-4 digit numbers, lightly stamped at the normal location.
These converted receiver guns were offered as "seconds" in special flyers to Marlin dealers, at a reduced price from regular first quality guns.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Yep, you guys hit the nail on the head. :D Very good. Parley
 

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If you want to see some interesting data, take a look in brophy's book at the serial number data for 1889, 1893 and 1894 Marlin muskets.
All but 3 1889's were .44 caliber, the 1893's were mostly .32-40's with other calibers being very rare, and the 1894's were 97 in .38 and 55 in .44 calibers.
The really interesting data is in the ship dates. Most of them fall in the 112xxx, 125xxx, or 332,xxx serial range, and although most were shipped the year they were made, a number seemed to have been shipped as much as 5-10 years after being made!
I've always wondered if they found these later, or got replacement orders from prisons, etc., and finished them to ship at that time. Obviously they had numerous receivers left over after orders stopped coming in, as shown by the large number of rebuilt rifles showing the stacking lug notch on the lower trigger plate. Times must have been pretty tight back then, to make them decide not to just replace the trigger plates, and ship these guns. I'd like to have the opportunity to disassemble one of these guns, just to see how they marked the serial numbers on the rest of the parts. I've always wondered if they were stamped with the original old numbers, or if they restamped these to match the restamped trigger plate?
 

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I'd just like to see one once. After all my years of collecting Marlins, at gunshows and through private channels, I have yet to lay my eyes on one, let alone the opportunity to disassemble one.
They have to be considered some of the rarest Marlins.

WB

I'd like to have the opportunity to disassemble one of these guns
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I have seen some for sale over the years. Merz antique arms had a couple for sale recently. One with the barrel cut down. Check out the bargains sheet in the expanded glossary of Brophy's book. By the way I have seen more Marlin Muskets for sale over the years than the Marlin Model 32. :wink: Those Model 1894 muskets marked "Bureau County" seem to be the most common. Parley
 

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I've seen a number of these ex-musket receiver guns. I actually had one in my early Marlin collecting days, and never knew what it was at the time. It wasn't until many years later that I saw another, and began to investigate the reasons for two 1894 Marlins having the strange "groove" cut into the lower plate. I sold the one I had because I thought it had been monkeyed with. DUH!!!
I searched, and asked anyone who I thought might know what it was, but never found an answer until about 5 years ago. A friend and antique arms dealer, had one for sale. I asked him if he knew the reason for the notch, and he was amazed I didn't know the answer. When he explained it, I looked at a musket, and immediately it made sense.
I do know of another friend who had one in his collection, and if he still has it, I'm going to politely ask if we can disassemble it. I'm dying to get more answers to my own questions.
 
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