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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I picked up a Model 1936 at a local gun show this past weekend and I really do not know much about them! I was hoping that some one out there might have some experience with them and may shed some light on this particular model. I know that it was a continuation of the Model 93 and they were only made for a short time (1936 & 1937), but that is about it. This one appears to be an early production gun, as it seems to have some of the features of the model 93 as to barrel markings and caliber marking and it does not seem to total reflect the more common barrel marking, nor serial number marking as described in Brophy's book. I have included a group of photos and would appreciate any comments and opinions at to what exactly it is? I am guessing that the butt stock sling attachment is not original to the gun, and that some or all of the plugged holes in the top of the are not original to the rifle. Can the butt plate be original? It is in nice shape with some of the original case color still evident. Any thoughts??


 

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While I'm no expert, I'm pretty sure the time line is 1893, 93, 1936, then the 36. I own a 36ADL and it has the same butt plate that is on your rifle, so I am pretty sure that is factory correct. From what I have read, there are a lot of factory variations on the 1936 and 36 models that are correct because they were 'sort of' transition guns. So finding minor differences between the same model rifle does not mean it isn't factory correct. The holes drilled in the top of the receiver are after market, but the tang should have holes which are correct and were continued through the model 36. It's looks to be an honest 1936.

That is a beautiful rifle and congrats on a great find.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks for the info. I'm particularly gald to hear some confirmation as to the correctness of the butt plate. That was one of my primary concerns in buying this particular rifle. It is tough to pass up one of these older Marlins when they come up!
 

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Interesting that this late a gun has a Corporation barrel.

Is there a bullseye in the stock?

(By the way, the elevator in the rear sight is backward. The "fish hook" should butt up against the back of the leaf when the sight's in its lowest position.)

A handsome carbine. Model 1936's don't show up very often!
 

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you have a first variation 1936. with no prefix to the serial number and in the 3000 range it
proably was made late in 1936.the early 1936's are basically the model 93 with the stock and the
forearm being about the only differance.I dont think the sling stud in the stock would be factory.
It showed up in the 1937 catalog as a replacement for the model 93.
 

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Very nice looking rifle, I would like to haver one like it. 8) 8) 8)
 

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marlin 1893 said:
you have a first variation 1936. with no prefix to the serial number and in the 3000 range it
proably was made late in 1936.the early 1936's are basically the model 93 with the stock and the
forearm being about the only differance.I dont think the sling stud in the stock would be factory.
It showed up in the 1937 catalog as a replacement for the model 93.
I agree...great rifle, and thanks for the pictures.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
No bulls eye on this rifle. Thanks everyone for the input and info! I like these old Marlins and am always happy to run across a nice one. I should have seen the reversed sight elevator right off, but looked right past it...is is corrected. I'm usually more into Whitney Kennedys, but never pass up a good Marlin! I'm a collector without really trying and always enjoy learing more about them on this site. Thanks.
 

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That is the correct buttplate for the 1936 Warren. The serrated is std. for that model. The holes in the receiver top are all aftermarket, as no scope holes were drilled on the 1936 models. Those deep grooves in the comb of the buttstock are not factory, but were a popular change done to old leverguns. I've seen that done often on various old Marlins.
The factory sling swivels for a 1936 were identical to those used on the Model '71 Win. and are very wide. They were quick disconnect style, but not like those on your 1936.
 

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WK,
I also have a Model 1936 just like yours except the sight elevator is reversed and in the correct position. ;D

Mine does have a different buttplate that is about 1" thickness with 4 recessed round holes and 3 diamonds holes that are alternated in the buttplate as more of a cushion. Mine also has a type of swivel sling holders that are shaped in the size of a paperclip design with an inside open area of 1 3/8" loop. These appear to be original design. Mine does not have the four drilled holes on the top of the receiver. I like the fatter forearm design of this model.

The really strange thing is that many years ago, I took the buttplate off and when I did, I discovered a man's name and also 1936 carved into the wood on the end of the stock. I bought this used gun probably 35-40 years ago and I have never fired it. I put it away and forgot about it for many years before getting it out one day and looking it over more closely.

Mine is Serial # XXX with no letter prefix. I posted some info quite some time ago here on the board and I was told that my gun was made in 1936.

You have an excellent Marlin there and I love the photos too. Thank you for sharing this with all of us.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Vall, You're the last guy in the world I would question when it comes to Marlins :), but Brophy does mention the fluted comb butt stock on the 1st variation Model 1936 and it is shown with that feature in the catalog illustrations of that model in his book. So there is a good chance this is correct from the factory (I hope). I know the 2nd variation did not have it, so it must have been a very limited application. This is the only one I have ever had a chance to look at so it is new to me. I definitely agree that the sling stud and the frame holes have to be aftermarket additions.

I had not pulled the butt plate, but it would be interesting to see if there is anything on the stock of this one. Glad to share this one and real happy I found it.
 

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Is the forend a 93 part? I thought the 1936 debuted the longer fore arm thats stil with us in the 336 series.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
From what I can glean from Brophy's book, the 1st variation of the model 1936 had this configuration of the forearm. In his photos and description, the later style seemed to show up in what he calls the model 1936, 2nd variation. The later larger forearm continued into the model 36 and later. Apparently the forearm configuration on this particular carbine was very short lived.
 

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Kind of off topic here, but Which ever guy at Marlin, thought up the fat forend, and heavier stocks, should have had his pink
slip next day. ;D I suppose since less wood was removed, they saved a few minutes on making them, but talk about going against the generally accepted lines of aesthetics on rifles, FAT aint where its at! ;D

Certainly is a nice example, I have yet to score a nice 1936
 

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Here is the cropped out section from the 1936 Marlin catalog of the 1936's. Talk's about the unbreakable buttplate, I am a summing, the metal one that you have.

The Nov. price sheet still showed the Model 93 for $25, but didn't show the 1936 yet. The barrel was probably a left over. My Model 93 made in 1935 has the same barrel.
 

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You know, when you sit there and think about it, what has happened to all of the old guns? Surly they are not all junk and discarded, as I have never discarded a firearm in my life. So where are they? You very rarely see a gun like this for sale, so somebody has to have them.
 

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The buttplate and buttstock sure appear "stock" and original to me, and you probably can add verification by removing the buttstock and finding a match to the serial code!? Marlin typically added the serial code to the buttstock on the inner tang mating surface...
nice example!
 

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Appears I was mistaken on that stock Warren. I got my 1936 catalog out, and the picture of the buttstock is exactly as your's, so the early guns did indeed have that deep flute.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
You guys have got me all fired up! Got another small show to go to this weekend...I'll be looking, but I doubt that I could luck out twice. WK
 
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