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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello everyone!
My name is Ryan, I just graduated the Riverside Sheriffs Academy and I was hoping to obtain some information on my great grandfathers rifles that I have inherited. I have done much research on the "outerweb" but no two answers are consistent. I was hoping to find out a back story and possibly value on 2 rifles.

The first rifle is a Marlin Model 1936 .30-30 Lever Action. A gunsmith told me today that it is an ADL Delux produced in 1945 only and less then 50 were produced. I do not know the accuracy of his information. I tried to take the best pictures possible. The serial number starts with B 3### The barrel is 20" long, making me think it is the carbine version because of the full length mag tube.

The second one is a Marlin .22 cal (L, S and LR) NO. 47. Patent March 1908. The stock and slide are checkered. Serial number 4###. Inside the receiver the serial number is only 3 digits 4## From what I read, this rifle was only issued in 1931 if one bought 4 shares of Marlin stock valued at $100 and was never released for general sale to the public and therefore is not very common. It still has VERY strong tiger-striped case hardening on the receiver.

Any ideas?











If anyone needs better pictures taken, I'd be more then happy to.

Thank you again =)
 

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I'm not an expert and this is what I have found down in the Reference Forum. The Model 47 was made from 1930-1931. Couldn't pinpoint the exact year. The Model 36 using the B serial number was made in 1941. Like I said I'm not an expert, I would also post this in the Marlin Collector's and the Rimfire forums. There are some very knowledgeable people in both forums. No matter what comes out of this, you have some unique rifles with a lot of history :). Enjoy them, Lonnie.
 

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Except for the lever Models 39, 39A, I know next to nothing about Marlin rimfires. The 36 appears to be a 1940-41 RC (regular carbine.) An ADL should have a 24" barrel, 2/3 magazine tube, and checkering on the pistol grip and forearm. They are both nice rifles and a great inheritance. Welcome and have a great day, Jack


Sorry, I kenw it was a 1936, I dont know why I typed 36. CRS perhaps? jt
 

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tc8228, elcome to MO!! Wow, nice old Marlins with family history, can't beat that. Looks to me to be working guns used to feed family when time were tough, take good care of them. As a retired LEO, welcome to the world of law enforcement and best of luck in your future. take care, John.
 

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tc8228 said:
Hello everyone!
My name is Ryan, I just graduated the Riverside Sheriffs Academy and I was hoping to obtain some information on my great grandfathers rifles that I have inherited. I have done much research on the "outerweb" but no two answers are consistent. I was hoping to find out a back story and possibly value on 2 rifles.

The first rifle is a Marlin Model 1936 .30-30 Lever Action. A gunsmith told me today that it is an ADL Delux produced in 1945 only and less then 50 were produced. I do not know the accuracy of his information. I tried to take the best pictures possible. The serial number starts with B 3### The barrel is 20" long, making me think it is the carbine version because of the full length mag tube.

The second one is a Marlin .22 cal (L, S and LR) NO. 47. Patent March 1908. The stock and slide are checkered. Serial number 4###. Inside the receiver the serial number is only 3 digits 4## From what I read, this rifle was only issued in 1931 if one bought 4 shares of Marlin stock valued at $100 and was never released for general sale to the public and therefore is not very common. It still has VERY strong tiger-striped case hardening on the receiver.

Any ideas?
If anyone needs better pictures taken, I'd be more then happy to.[/b]
Thank you again =)
tc8228,
First Welcome to Marlin owners.
The info on the model 47 appears correct.My info also states the lowest recorded serial # is 1247 and the highest 5101 and yes it was a non-cataloged rifle availible with the purchase of 4 Marlin preferred stocks.With your case colors still intact,it should appear as tiger stripping due to the process used on this model.Checkering should be in a diamond pattern.I have no idea of value though.
The 1936 is an RC=Regular Carbine.Value is probably in the $300-$400 range,but does vary by location.If the model is 1936(not 36)it is a second variation (prefix B)made somewhere between 1937 and 1941.Someone else may be able to clarify this better.The first variation 1936 has a flat mainspring and second variation of the 1936 and all variations of the 36 has a coil mainspring.
Stick around for awhile.Lots of knowledge here.
LG
 

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I think your gunsmith might be mistaken as far as the 1936 goes. From here it looks like a 1936 Carbine. Great gun but nothing very special. Its great you got your great grandfathers guns too!
 

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I think your gunsmith might be mistaken as far as the 1936 goes. From here it looks like a 1936 Carbine. Great gun but nothing very special.
I agree. I looks like a run of the mill 1936 RC. A great gun if it still shoots good groups. I would refinish it with an oil finish that doesn't glare like that and have the steel all browned.
 

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I'd probably leave it alone metal wise, if I did anything I'd have it recased. The wood I'm not sure. If its really as shiny as it appears I'd try cutting it with steel wool first as long as the finish is in good shape. Otherwise I'd probably just strip it & tru oil it. It sucks when its your gun that they dont demand a premium, but its kinda nice for a guy that wants a square bolt but doesn't want to spend close to a grand for a good 93.
I had mine shipped to a local guy when I found it on an online auction. He was happy to do the transfer but thought I was nuts for spending $250 for a 30/30 when he could get me a new one for less than a hundred more. Even when he saw that it wasn't current production he thought I was nuts. To most guys these are just old 30/30's. The same guy, if it said 1893 on the tang would have gotten stupid with the price. The 1936's & 36's fall into a crack between the totally utilitarian gun users like that shop owner who think their outdated & the collectors who dont apreciate them much yet. The result is they can be had at ridiculously low prices sometimes.
To me, theyre every bit as cool as the 1893's but with the addition of more modern metalurgy. Mines not as old as yours. I believe mines a 1946. Mines blued while yours was cased but the general configuration is the same.
I like the front sight behind the band & dovetailed into the barrel MUCH better than on a ramp as in newer guns. I use this gun just like any other 30/30 and its always performed just fine. I'v got a couple 1893's but I hesitate to use jacketed bullets in them & generally load them lightly. I treat them like theyre 100+ years old, the 36 I'm confident useing it like it was made yesterday. Another bonus is mines drilled & tapped on the side for a reciever sight, the 1893's werent.

Anyway I think you got a coupla very nice rifles there you can probably shoot & enjoy for the remainder of your lifetime. :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Hello everyone!!
Sorry work schedule got a little busy... Just getting back on here. Thank you all so much for the information! Now I know what I have and I plan to keep passing these rifles down to my kids. (Should I have any one day) If not, I'll teach my Labrador how to shoot =)
 

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Use them, shoot them, enjoy them they have a story to tell and you can just add to it..
 

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Hi Ryan, and welcome to marlinowners! all others provided correct info - the 1936ADL, besides having the checkering and 24" barrel, was also equipped with a very rare style of sling swivels, made by Winchester!? and simply screwed to the stock surface without inletting. The model 47 is extremely rare, and especially in good shape with visible case coloring. I would like to trade photos of mine with you to compare. The last I saw on auction sold for $1400 (buy it now option). You are doing right by keeping these in your family to enjoy!
 

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Ryan,
Welcome to the company of fellow Marlin Owners. Bring your thoughts, questions and ideas, as these guys just love to talk.
As far as your rifles, at first I thought you had a 36, which was the version just before yours, if I am correct. It had what was called a perch belly forearm, while yours is straight. I can tell you though, that my 36, even with it's slight additional value, gets used just like all my other guns. I just have to remember to grab 32 Specials for the pocket instead of 30-30's.
You have a shooter and you are lucky that you know it's history. My Great Grandfathers, guns are getting worn out, but it took several generations of shooters. I had a hand in that process and am proud of it. I need a picture of my Grandson shooting his Great Great Great Great Grandfathers gun. Time sure flies and you sir, keep in touch and keep those guns.
Larry
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Thank you to everyone who has put in their 2 cents here and given me great info!!

The stock on the .30-30 has a crack running through it that looks like it has been repaired at one time, long ago. I probably wouldn't shoot it simply because of this. I hear there are some people who can work wonders with older wood and could possibly fix this crack. I'll post pictures ASAP of the fracture.

Think it should be repaired or just left alone? If repaired, could modern ammunition be fired through it? Reduced load ammo maybe?

Any thoughts? =)
 

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Welcome to MOs from NE Florida. Those are two sweet old rifles you inherited. I'm sure the stock can be repaired on the .30-30 without affecting its value as it has been repaired once already. You should definitely have someone good repair the crack. As for shooting it, you should have no trouble with any standard factory ammo. It was made to be shot, not just hung on a wall. I'm sure your great grand dad would be pleased to see her doing her thing for you now, as she did for him back in the day.
 

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Think it should be repaired or just left alone? If repaired, could modern ammunition be fired through it? Reduced load ammo maybe?
You can safely use standard 30-30 ammo. Just repair the stock and shoot it! ;D
 

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I've successfully repaired several very broken stocks.
It's time consuming, but with care you should have showpiece to be proud of, and never see the repair.
When you're ready to start, PM me and i'll walk you though the materials needed and the process.

If the barrel is clean and not pitted, your 30-30 should shoot cast bullets very well. I have afew of the same intage and every one is outstanding.
When you're ready to reload, I'll provide some cast bullet samples as well
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Brian in FL said:
Welcome to MOs from NE Florida. Those are two sweet old rifles you inherited. I'm sure the stock can be repaired on the .30-30 without affecting its value as it has been repaired once already. You should definitely have someone good repair the crack. As for shooting it, you should have no trouble with any standard factory ammo. It was made to be shot, not just hung on a wall. I'm sure your great grand dad would be pleased to see her doing her thing for you now, as she did for him back in the day.


Does anyone on here have any recommendations for a person that can do a quality woodwork repair?
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
pls1911 said:
I've successfully repaired several very broken stocks.
It's time consuming, but with care you should have showpiece to be proud of, and never see the repair.
When you're ready to start, PM me and i'll walk you though the materials needed and the process.

If the barrel is clean and not pitted, your 30-30 should shoot cast bullets very well. I have afew of the same intage and every one is outstanding.
When you're ready to reload, I'll provide some cast bullet samples as well
I would never trust my own hand on this gun lol. I would screw it up beyond all belief :D
 
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