Marlin Firearms Forum banner

21 - 40 of 64 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,024 Posts
Discussion Starter #21
You can't proceed to finish work if the ground is not prepared. Chips and dings in wood have to be fixed before the final sanding and topcoating.
A flaw in the left side wrist of the stock. Fortunatly the wood is oil free and I have a doner 1949 Marlin Walnut stock that was previously broken beyond repair.

Square up the chip with a smooth cut file, check for oil in the wood and if none, no special epoxie is needed, simple waterproof carpenters glue will do the trick.

Harvest a matching sliver of wood from the 1949 Marlin stock, make sure you install it with the grain running the same direction. Trim it to fit with the files, a bit large in every dimension is best, I'll file it down to perfect later.

A dab of Titebond on all mateing surfaces, align and hold for several minutes for the glue to bite and set it aside for several hours to set to full strength.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,024 Posts
Discussion Starter #22
The glue dries faster than 24 hours but I've learned to be a bit patient. Coming back sooner means for me coming back really soon and fileing away on an unset glue joint, knocking of the patch. So, 24 hours to set and its on their rock solid. A few swipes with a fine cut file to establish leading edge, backside and general shape. I leave the wood patch larger than its finished dimension for a sanding with the stock installed on the frame. It may be the patch needs a drop of stain to match, maybe not. It'll be evident at the wet sanding stage.


 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,024 Posts
Discussion Starter #23
Gettin to the end of fitting the butt up for straight grip. Slightly round over the edges of the upper tang too, this helps keep the wood from dipping below the surface of the tang during the removal of factory finish. Some loss of wood at the edges is inevitable and this old trick helps keep the project looking like the wood grew into place.

The proper way to fold a 1/4 sheet for finish sanding. Abrasive never touches and dulls against abrasive. So, each refold frees up perfect undamaged abrasive. Folded this way, its stiff enough for large flats and flexible enough for fluteing in the comb, wrist and convex surfaces of the toe and heel.

Fitment and shapeing of the bottom tang to wrist, almost there...a wet sanding will see it perfect.

Top tang fitment and shapeing to the wrist, again, almost there lacking only a wet sanding for perfect fit. Not the patch, it'll show a bit but not too bad. I was able to darken it some with acid stain. But the fit is tight and the glue line invisible. Next patch I have to do will likely come from a chunk of wood removed from under the buttplate for a better color match.

A very light sanding is needed all over to finish up. A coat of TruOil will be rubbed in hard and then sanded lightly back to remove the last of the whiskers. All of this is done with the wood installed to watch the edges and corners. Very soon I'll pull the stock and get busy really rubbin in the TruOil, cutting it back level with 0000 steel wool and a final buff and wax for that satin glow and warm soft feel.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,024 Posts
Discussion Starter #24
The finish goes in the wood. I don't like the bartop epoxy look, so, thin coats rubbed in by hand till the finish is dry and your hand so hot it feels like its in a fire. If your hand ain't hot and the finish ain't almost dry to the touch, its too thick and not "hand rubbed". Force the finish into the wood. Some will build up on the surface, we'll level and polish it later but, walnut is porus and I want the pores filled so they don't show at the end.
So, all the marlin spray on brown urethane is gone, the wood is smooth but not so smooth that its sealed against finish (if you're pushing all the way to 500 or 800 grit paper for a working gun finish, you're wasteing a lot of effort in my opinion). Here the first 3 or 4 "Drops" of finish are pushed into the wood...Drops, not gobbs. Thin coats pushed in and built up is the program here.

Now, two thin coats (not more than a teaspoon total) rubbed in hot and hard...finish nearly dry before I can put the wood down. I'll let it sit for several hours and kiss it with sand paper to shave off any whiskers then, 3 to 6 topcoats of Tru Oil, hand rubbed at the end.

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,024 Posts
Discussion Starter #25
After about a three hour sit, a very light sanding with fresh 220g paper and a very forceful burnishing with 0000 steel wool to prep the surface for a third light coat of TruOil to seal the surface.


And as this third coat, rubbed in hard is setting up I finally get the camera and light right enough to show the true colors (gold and green and brown) and the grain (stripe and some interesting waves around a tree branch or two) in this rather nice chunk of Marlin Walnut.




 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,024 Posts
Discussion Starter #26
Fifth coat of finish in the wood. Prolly get up to 3 more coats today and then tomorrow, wax, wax, wax.

Tru Oil is great stuff, it makes a durable on or in the wood finish. We'll be working an in the wood finish with wax top coat. Softer, more traditional. A bit more work, plenty durable and easy to maintain. Think coats rubbed till hot dry quickly in the dehumidified house. About 2 hours between coats. Each coat is steelwooled to satin and level when dry, dusted well and another thin coat rubbed in. Buttpad is off from now on to allow a good coat or two of finish to seal the endgrain. Its unsealed on most factory stocks as they install the pad and then spray on the finish. The action inletting will be sealed last, just before storeing the stock pending completion of the rifle.
I rub the finish on bare handed. Clean up is a snap...a few drops of mineral/baby oil rubbed on my dirty hands, add a few drops of dish soap, rub in...lather up with a few drops of water to float the finish off the skin, rinse in hot water, dry and off to the next project with baby smooth and clean hands.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,024 Posts
Discussion Starter #27
While the last coat of finish dries in the buttstock, its time to clean up and restore the Marlin buttplate. Here it sits, not too aweful....no chips or dents or cracks anyway. This one is the hard rubber type vice plastic. It won't polish up shiney but it will look great. First job is to get all the sprayed on Marlin Brown tint finish off, specically if its loose and it usually is.

A gentle scrubbing over the checkering and in the lettering with a fine bristle stainless steel brush pulls off the old finish and cleans up the diamonds and lettering. If the finish is still bonded tight, just clean it up, no sense ruining those soft diamonds that are still in good shape. At this point I also gently sand the smooth surfaces to remove the old finish and take out most of the gouges and scuffs. 220g aluminium oxide paper is just fine on a hard rubber pad.

I spend a gentle bit of time burnishing the flat areas and around the edges (where we sanded them down with the stock) just a polish with 0000 steel wool....not trying to remove any material, just softening up the sanding marks.

Final touch is a gentle buff with Brownells fff stock polishing compound on the flat faces and edges...that last bit of smoothing...be careful not to round over the edges where the plate meets the stock.

Screws were chucked in the drill press and polished at low speed with worn 220g sandpaper. Brass screws are original to this one....they were blackened. I'll just leave em bright. But if you gotta have browned or blackened brass, just touch it with oxpho blue from brownells. You can have them black then or if working a muzzleloader, go with some light browns that look like tarnish on an old weapon....sorta takes off the Sportin Gal look from a newly finished muzzleloader.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,024 Posts
Discussion Starter #28
This is it. Buttstock is done, almost. First step is the rubout. I cut the last coat down level with a gentle rubout with 0000 steel wool, same as every coat. Now, from satin to satin lovely, smooth and warm.
Rub the stock well and firmly with fff stock polishing compound. Keep rubbing till it feels right...I guess the description is it dosn't snag or drag or flutter, it just pulls smoothly over every area of the stock. I rub with the grain. When its rubbed to satisfaction, buff it off with a dry cotton towel and then apply the first of several coats of Johnsons paste wax. LET THE WAX DRY, works best that way. Buff out each coat of wax on a clean terry towel. I even wax under the buttplate and later, in the action recesses. Buff, Buff and it'll look and feel great. Easy as pie to restore a stock, just takes some effort thats all.


So, heres what it looks like after rub and wax and buff. Forend won't be as pretty, its straighter grain but hopefully the black grain will come up like it did for this stock. Its all original parts. They don't look perfect, they don't even look absolutely new but....they look pretty good, I thinks.





 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,024 Posts
Discussion Starter #29
The forend is coming along. The grain pattern is not as striking but it has the nice black highlights and some green and gold flowing thru it. I think it'll be a pretty good match for the buttstock. Pics soon, should have the forend done Mon or Tue eve. Then I gotta get busy pulling that SSN off the frame.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,024 Posts
Discussion Starter #31
Foreend is finished so time to move on to metal work. Process for refinishing the foreend was the same as for the buttstock. About 7 coats of TruOil rubbed in and out, buffed and waxed. I'll pack it up in the dent free zone untill needed again at final assembly where it'll get waxed again and installed.
The grain pattern is less swirly but sure shows up nice. Also some matching green and gold in the stock. Overall its a pretty good match for the buttstock. I suppose the lesson I take from it is not to hide the wood under brown tinted spray on coatings. Mostly, I find wood looks just fine natural, certaintly better than most false color finishes. Even birch can shine under an untinted finish if treated in a way that higlights its natural beauty.


 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,024 Posts
Discussion Starter #32
When I was a wee dingdong weblo only 11 years old (some almost 38 years ago this year) my Pappy bought me a Buck Special #119. Leather sheath, not the nylon crap in those days. I still have, carry and use this knife in its original sheath. I am proud of it and my Pappy. Now in those days, kids made a big deal of getting their SSN. We were somebody, we could be found if lost, identified anytime, taken care of...I don't know how that all linked into a SSN that I wasn't allowed to carry the card in my wallet but it was a simpler time and gentler too. We all knew, adults alike, our important stuff had to be identified to us as individuals and so, everybody had a cheep vibroengraver and the SSN was scared into everything....such was the fate of the pommel of Ol #119....My SSN resides there to this day.
Let me suggest that you think twice about carving your SSN into any object and please allow me to suggest that a nice gun receiver is no fracking place for a vibroengraver or an unskilled hand with a knife or gravers point for any reason. None at all. If you absolutly have to have your ssn or other identifying data on your gun, put it on a slip of paper under the recoil pad or grip cap and keep it a secret...no one ever looks there unless ya tell the Detective to.
With that all said, thank the gun gods the SSN carved with a knife point into the left receiver wall of this Marlin was not too deep and can be draw filed and polished pretty much all the way out.
The SSN on this gun went from front to back...thank heavens he/she didn't carve I Heart Mary or some other nonsense with more than 9 letters/numbers. Here I've draw polished the front half, 100 grit backed on a stiff file, several hundreds of strokes to remove 99%+ of the first 5 numbers.

I switch back and forth between 100 and 220 grits to ensure I have remove most or all of the offending carvings. Here it is with a 220g kiss on the action to double check...really fine carved lines (i.e. the last little bit) will get lost in the 100g sanding marks so it takes a finer sanding to see if they are really gone.

Haveing draw polished the back half to remove the final 4 numbers of this particular dingdong carving...

A kiss of the action with 220g looks pretty good. A few spots where the last traces of a number peek thru but they will come out or become totally lost in the final polish for rust blueing which will be a 150g finish for a nice satin glow and to hold lots of oil on the surface of this soon to be hard working rifle.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,024 Posts
Discussion Starter #33
What was black and a bit of brown and a few scratches and inappropriate carvings is now becoming smooth and silver. Soon it'll be rusty red brown and then velvety satin black again.
Back to the home made flap wheel. Best for inner curved surfaces and outer tight curves. Barrels and flats I do by hand but there is no better way I know of to quickly clean up a lever than a bit of 100g aluminum oxide on a stick in a drill press at moderate rpm. A light kiss, just get the blue and rust off, clean up any pitting. If you're thinking such a primitave tool can damage a part, go try a Gunsmith Grade buffing wheel with fine compound and see how quick it gouges out hunks of metal. You wonder why a polish and hot blue is so expensive? It takes years to master the buffing wheel, you pay for the skill and I have deepest respect for smiths that know the buffing wheel as a powerful but dangerous friend.
This is a slower, gentler process, so is hand polishing but remember, stay off the critical areas like the width of the lever screw boss, the trigger disconnect plate, the nose of the lever. Strip these by hand with fine sand paper or use a commercial rust and blue remover. They are sized and hardened properly as is an there is no call to change dimensions in critical areas, changing dimensions = accelerated decrepitude, you actually wear out the part without useing it.
Final polish before blueing will be gently, by hand useing 150 to 220 grit aluminum oxide paper. Nothing finer is recommended for rust blueing. The chemicals create a satin finish and going to 800+ like some folks feel is necessary simply gets deglossed in the formation of Ferroferric (black) iron oxide. The oxide is the same as formed in hot blueing, rust blueing is just a different process that does not lend itself to a "Master Shine" as does hot caustic blueing.

The lever, struck on the flap wheel. Smooth and awaiting only final strikeing by hand. I'll hand strike all the small parts at once when I am ready for the 3 to 6 days of work it will take to develope the rust blue finish on them.

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,024 Posts
Discussion Starter #34
The major components lined up for initial striking by hand. This one is in pretty good shape, just worn blueing, not much pitting and the SSN is GONE. So, a consistent finish to the metal by hand to prevent loss of required markings and no dished out screw holes.
A few hours hand work and I should be back with photos of the first cycle blooming up a layer of red rust and its conversion to black feroferric oxide....from silver to red to grey to red to black. With luck and a bit of humidity (the garage will be our Damp Box for this project) 5 to 8 cycles should see this Marauderesk project nearing completion and ready for its time on the range and the woods.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,024 Posts
Discussion Starter #35
Flat surfaces stay flat....back the paper with a stiff tool like a block or a file or a round in the tight spots. Keeps one from dishing out screw holes and slots as with a power buffer.

And completly struck. A few 1/4 sheets of 120g aluminum oxide. Change the paper often, dull paper dosn't cut as aggressively and I save the dull sheets for a final pass, full length on all surfaces to blend everything in. 120 to 180g produces a finish that allows the chemicals to penetrate forming black oxide, holds oil or grease for longer periods and helps hide any of the little imperfections that accumulated over the years but are too deep to remove without loosing critical markings (like the SN and the JM barrel stamp indicating this is a real Marlin, not a MarlRem) and it is the right grit for a satin hunters finish, matching the stocks already finished.

Off now to hang the parts, warm and humid and start the first 1 and 3 hour cycles of rust and then a first boil this evening for what should be a medium grey first bite.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,024 Posts
Discussion Starter #36
Basic supplies to build up the Rust black finish. Now begins a cycle I've seen called, Marlin Soup. Coat, rust, boil, card, start over. 6 to eight cycles.

Hang the parts on hangers for easy handling. From here on out, no oil, grease, wax, skin oil, etc. Parts handled with clean towels and clean freshly scrubbed hands. Fingerprints now will transfer into the final finish. Although much of the flaws and polishing marks will blend in, strangely enough, fingerprints will be perfectly preserved thru every cycle to the final finish. The only option is full strip and redo.

First coat is wet. Any nicks in your fingers, you'll feel the burn as a light sting sort of like a kiss of nettles on your ankle as you walk thru the grass. This wet coat establishes penetration of the pores and begins very rapidly (in a hot humid damp box) a very fine and deeply bonded layer of oxide. Fine grain and bonded is what makes rust blue somewhat more durable and long lived than caustic hot tank blueing. Remember, rust bluing chemicals are a rust maker and a fine rust remover. Every coat after this is nearly dry, so dry that the "sauce" evaporates very quickly after its applied. Wipe in one direction....wipe back over and you pull the prevously created rust from the surface, sorta scrubbing it off before it can bite. One hour this sits and rusts and then a fine dry coat with a 3 hour soak, then a good boil in clean water to convert red ferric oxide to black ferroferric oxide.
Here, rust is developing in minutes only.


 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,024 Posts
Discussion Starter #37
Slow rust blueing is slow. About as slow as a Costa Rican gun safe near the sea shore with an unplugged Golden Rod. The results take about 3 to 10 days to materialize but the ultimate result is much finer.
Here, barely over 1 hour with the first very wet coat of Pilkingtons...A fine bloom of rust. Fine grained, fairly even and not too many fingerprints! There is no carding (rub out w/0000 steel wool to remove unbonded oxides) at this point. A second, very thin, nearly dry, coat of Pilkingtons is applied to the steel. It should dry completly in a few seconds. Wipe in one direction, cover every part fully. Handle every part with clean dry rags or paper towels....no oil or wax allowed. It looks splotchy, it is. It will even up all but the oily spots. We'll know after the first boil if a strip and restart is in order.
From here on out the process is: Boil the red rusted part. Force it dry with a hot air gun, water makes spots. Rub it out gently with degreased 0000 steel wool. Thinly, thinly coat the parts with Pilkingtons and hang it warm and humid for 3 to 12 hours. (Longer and intermediate coatings may be needed to rust some alloy steels like Win 94 receivers, marlin sights and levers, etc.) Once its boiled, you can even hang it and come back another day since boiling converts the red oxide to black and kills the solution.
As you can see, some alloys resist rusting quite a bit.

Mag tubes are difficult to handle and difficult to rust. On Marlins, the forming process seems to leave hard and soft spots in a corkscrew pattern. It can be difficult to have a final finish that dosn't show the cork screw or a few very light spots. These spots are a bit greyer but disappear under the final coat of oil. With rust blue, when it starts to turn a hint of grey, its telling you it's time to oil or grease or wax the metal, the protective oil has evaporated. But, either dry or oiled, its a beautiful satin finish.

Hardest part of the barreled action is the left side panel. Smooth even strokes with the Pilkingtons helps keep streaks from forming as you go. Much of the streaking is buffed back and blended with the 0000 wool rub out...but careful prep means better finish and less work overall. Are you getting the theme? Much of the refinishing of a gun is all about how well and diligent you are with the rubbing and rubbing and rubbing.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,024 Posts
Discussion Starter #38
Only 30 minutes into a second 2 hour stint where the solution is allowed to bite the steel. A fairly even bloom is rising on the metal and its so hot and humid even a kiss of ferroferric oxide is blackening up in the finish befor the first boil.

Everything you own can be multipurpose. For example, the turkey fryer can be adapted to a rust blueing tank for making Marlin Soup. Only specialized piece of equipment for blueing barrels and actions is a black iron tank large enough to do the job. (Iron only, other metals can interfear with the conversion from red to black oxide).
Tacos for dinner and Marlin for dessert.....See ya again later tonight with the first hints of black on this good American steel.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,024 Posts
Discussion Starter #39
First of the black oxide on the first boil...only a little at a time. Good rust blue comes up slowely.
Small parts ready for first boil in an iron pan on the stove. Double filtered water from the drinking tap to make sure there is no mineral streaks or spots.

Fire is lit under the big boiling tank and the water is fast approaching a boil....big parts submerged to bring them up to hot too.

After the first boil the small parts have a rather nice layer of black, lots of fluff on there. I want the oxide that is bonded tight so anything that resists a hard scrubbing with 0000 steel wool stays, everything else is disposed of. (remember, no grease or oil, handle with clean hands and use clean towels to keep fingers off the metal finish for now)

Meanwhile, the big tank has been at a vigorous rolling boil for 10 or so minutes...time to pull the parts one at a time, starting with the lever and the trigger group....force dry all the metal parts with a heat gun, push the water out of the holes and slots and crannies, hang them up to cool.

A different alloy than the small parts, first layer is more gun metal grey. It'll be thinner too after the unwanted fluff is scrubbed off. After this scrubbing the base metal will show thru...no worries, it darkens with each pass and the scrubbing ensures only the permanent color remains in place.

The action and barrel, pretty even and also a nice shade of grey. A bit lighter in the photos due to the flash. Overall I'm happy with this first pass on the action and barrel.

Scrubbing off the unbonded oxides on the magazine tube. These tubes fight being blued. But it'll come out okay in the end.

As you see, knocking back the receiver and barrel. A good first pass. Pretty even, no finger prints and just a bit darker than the photos show. Rust blueing is slightly faster in the summer....the metal is never this dark, first pass with a cool/dry winter rust blue...even with a damp box.

I cleaned them all up, coated again with a thin coat of Pilkingtons and I'll let them hang untill boiling them again on Monday evening. Sometimes I go 2 times per day, but, gotta work this week so, I'll kiss it again with rust blueing solution in the morning and let the days heat and humidity work on the finish for me.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,024 Posts
Discussion Starter #40
A quick check before bed and the second bloom is comeing up a bit slower but very fine and even.


An addition thin wipe with Pilkingtons to work the night thru...another in the morning then second boil and carding tomorrow night.
 
21 - 40 of 64 Posts
Top