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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have need of a consultant: a Marlin lever action gunsmith experienced with relining barrels as well as minor modification... Maybe more the latter than the former.
The project in mind could be a prototype to kickstart Marlin's slow-but-sure-to-come quality under Remington.
I know it's a sin to think of such, but perhaps we could help the brand survive another generation.

Blind brand loyalty? Ok, probably.
Changes in ownership over time occur with the ebb and flow of family and corporate economics... it's a fact of life...I don't even know who owns Winchester today, or where which parts or guns are sourced... same with Savage, and others.

While I recognize the challenges of moving manufacturing operations, the time span of startup quality problems passed to the public is an inexcuseable breach of confidence.

However, in relation to comparable products, I must also recognize and honor the art in simplicity of Marlin's design which eclipses all other levers in reliability, serviceability, and commensurate longevity.
This piece of Americana I'll work to preserve.
The only other comparably simple design is Browning's venerable .45 of 1911, which of course needs no discussion... simple, serviceable, reliable.
Marlin levers are simply American, and part of our heritage worth preserving....It's mine... It's yours... It's ours.
 

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Unfortunately, marlin is gone because it's no longer important to this generation to know how to smith a gun. It's only valuable now if a computer spits out a whole lot of sameness. This is no different a business philosophy than what you see in every residential subdivision built over the last 30 years. Sameness is important not quality, not custom fitted, and certainly durability is a lost word from our vocabulary:vollkommenauf:
 

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Can't help you with the consultant, but two thumbs up on your project. Hope you find success with it.

Also, I agree with you about the simplicity of the design. A few months ago, I was happy to discover, while disassembling and reassembling my Henry 30-30, that I could use videos on Marlins to do it. Henry has apparently copied Marlin's design pretty closely.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 · (Edited)
Rim rock, in many aspects, I agree the craftsmanship of the old machine tool operators is history, along with the marvelous sounds and aromas of old school machine shops.
However , with skill and care, today's equipment is much more capable than machines of old.
Being in manufacturing and engineering my entire career, I've witnessed the progression from manual machine operators through automated CNC machines to the newest 3d metallic printing development.
Accuracy and repeatable quality is available today that was in imaginable 20 years ago.... But the bloke running it and the company QC and top brass all have to equally care.... Or equally share the shame.
Remington employees and equipment are fully capable. But they lost their way for a bit, but I have confidence they'll be back up to snuff soon.
 

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I do agree as well in the marlin of the past. Its a shame to see craftmans ship going away. Ive been looking into a flint locks lately. And I really like what I see in some of the old craftmans ship of the originals carried on in this time and age.. Whats bad is the price of the great work and skill in these simple but great work of art in a rifle.
 

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i've been seriously waging this conversation in my head. I want a 336 so do I slap down 3-4 bills on a used one (yeah the JMs are like gold down here) or do i slap the same money down on a NIB gun and tell freedom group that I want this product?

I'd also rather pay a local retailer for a gun than a pawn shop or private seller for one.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
LONGBOW.. MY answer is simple..


GO OLD OR GO HOME

I stalk around for '93s, 36s , or 336s predating 1955. I especially like the ones with beautiful steel and ugly wood...
We can work magic with wood if the steel is good.

Give me a gently used and well cared for 36, and I'll likely give you price of a new gun anytime. So will many others.
 

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I've owned a Marlin 336 for many years, not always the same one but have sold and replaced a few.
I'm now an old man. I don't deer hunt anymore. I reminisce about days gone by. I deer hunted for many years near and on property my in-laws owned not far from where I live now. Some of the group I hunted with have passed the rest I've lost contact with and are surely old by now too. Almost to a man they carried a Marlin 336 in various calibers. A 94 Winchester was the exception.

The Marlin brings back so many precious memories. Now during deer season I lean it against a post on my front porch rising before dawn I pretend I'm a hunter even tho I would not shoot one if it walked 10' from me..... and deer have done just that while I've sat on the porch. The 336 holds a special place in my heart. I'll keep it clean and zeroed but its actual usefulness to me is questionable. I love the gun.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 · (Edited)
DDDWho,
The value of your Marlin lies in the library of memories written by each scratch or dimple in the stock, memories warmed by fires long past, and the special brotherhood shared with fellow woodsmen.
My group marks 23 years trekking to the deserts of west Texas for a dove hunt. We've not lost anyone to date, but for three it's likely their last hunt. The good news is that we have four grandsons this year, keeping the pump primed for the next generation.
In time, I expect them to share quiet time on they're own porch, cherishing again the feel of walnut on steel, and hopefully fond memories of fires long past, and those who kindled the flame.
Cheers,
Pablo
 

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There are a lot of great posts here. They pretty well cover the whole of the life for us. As an old man that still does hunt my experience with the manufacturing world is, quality problems start at the very top. The crews do what is required. The manufacturing processes of today far exceed anything of the past.
 
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