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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I just aquired my oldest Marlin in my collection. It is a no 2 sporting rifle in 32 long cal. Does any one know what the proper centerfire cartrige is for this one? it has the reversable firing pin for both rim and centerfire. It has a 28" octogen bbl and double set triggeres, crescent butt. overall condition ia pretty good with probably 70% metal finish and 40% wood. It is missing the sights and I would appreciate any help in locating originals.
Thanks for any help
Bob
 

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32 Colt, I think there was a long & short version but dont kbnow if you can shoot the short one.
MM93 will fill the gaps I think. :wink:
How bout pictures? :D

Oh yeah, Welcome aboard!
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I don't know how to post photos and being computer challenged I can't seem to find the instructions, probably something obviousl that I am missing!!
Bob
 

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Congratulations on your #2, some have double set triggers, but most do not.

The proper cartridge for your rifle is the 32 Long rimfire or centerfire and leverdude is right, the 32 Long Colt works fine for the centerfire version. Both are obsolete and while you can fine them occasionally at gunshows, etc., they are usually quite expensive. So reloading is probably the best option. But finding a mold can also be a bit of a challenge. Ideal made 2 molds for the 32 Long, # 299153, a heeled bullet weighing 90 grains and 299155, a non-heeled, hollow base bullet weighing 80 grains. These can be found in loading tool/mold combinations or the molds by themselves. For the loading tool/mold combinations, you will want to look for those marked 32L, 32 Long, 32 L.O.L. (Long outside lubricated, i.e., heeled) or 32 L.I.L. (32 Long inside lubricated, i.e., hollow base). Can be found, just not easily.



There may be modern mold manufacturers that make something for these sizes also.

This post details the easiest way to post a picture that I have read, I.m sure others may have some other ideas.

http://www.marlinowners.com/board/viewtopic.php?t=740

Good luck with your shooting.....

max
 

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For many years I never saw a #2 with DST's, and since I bought one a few years ago I've seen 5-6 of them. Not sure why I've come across more, but I guess it works that way sometimes.
Sights for your #2 in the original buckhorn, with silver blade front will be both expensive, and tough to find! I saw a silver blade close at one of the auction sights for just over $100 this weekend, and they rarely go less than about $70. The rear buckhorns are just as high, with most going near $100, and over if they have the correct elevator too. Your best bet to find one is a constant search of Ebay, but there will be stiff competition!
If I can make a suggestion, I would go for aftermarket sights, or optional Ballard sights, as either will be easier to find, and save a lot of money. You might consider a dovetail blank in the rear barrel dovetail, and the installation of a Marbles or Lyman tang sight. For the front you could use the optional Lyman or Marbles bead, or a old globe front sight.
These would be acceptable, and actually make it a much better sighting setup than factory sights.
Like Max I relaod for my Ballard in .32 Long, and also use an old Ideal tool to cast for it. Mine is not the desireable hollowbase, but the other one he mentioned, the standard 90 gr. non heeled bullet. This bullet works well in several Marlin .32 Long guns I own.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Well I sure apreciate all the info I have recieved here. Since last post I have discovered that that I need a new fireing pin as some one neutered this one.
I put some sights on that are not correct but will work OK for a test fire. I have some of the newly imported 32 long rimfire ammo. I have the old pin out and will be able to use it as a pattern for a new one. It is pretty simple and should go well, when I get time to actually do it. Is there any need to heat treat the firing pin? seems like soft should be OK.
Thanks
Bob
 

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Soft pins will peen themselves, and stick in the breechblock, especially the rear half that is struck by the hammer. If you make the pin out of tool steel, or stainless steel it will be fine. If you make it out of mild steel, you'll need to harden it by heating it red and dropping it into some Casite.
 
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