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Right to the point:

Remlin X7 synthetic stocks are thinner, lighter, more flexible, and have less glass fiber than the JM synthetic stocks.

Anybody else have enough experience to agree or contradict?

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Slightly more detailed version:

I really don't feel like writing an epic story and detailing everything about my experience with X7s and X7 stocks; but, as some of you know ... I've had MANY - mostly Mayfield Remlins, and all XL7s, except for the .223 that went to another MO member. But for those that want a little more information...

I've inletted Remlin XL7 stocks for larger barrels and contours. It's quick and easy. I go to full free-float, and then a little more if the weight of the rifle will cause contact with the flexible stocks when the rifle is rested at the tip of the fore-end. My "worst" one took no more than 25 minutes with a scraper; and for a fat Savage-pattern "Heavy Magnum" barrel contour, at that! They're very flexible, thin, and "soft" to work with. Glass fiber content is minimal. It's like carving in wet clay.

Recently, however, I got around to opening the barrel channel on my early production JM XL7 for a Savage-pattern "Light Varmint" contour barrel (which is not "light", or small, by any means). (From Marlin standard Sporter contour to a custom 6.5-284 Norma barrel with the Savage "Light Varmint" contour.)
I had never paid much attention before, but the JM stock is heavier, thicker, stiffer, and has a huge amount of glass fiber in it.
It took me four hours to open the barrel channel far enough to end up with 10 lbs of pressure at the end of fore-end - and I took shortcuts with huge chisel cuts to speed the work, rather than just the scraper.

That JM stock was worse than working with wood, whereas the Remlin stocks were like working with butter or clay.

Night and day difference....
 

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Didn't know that this was the case. I have a 2009 XS7S 308 Win that has CT Marlin markings and serial number but was REP stamped during 2010. I "think" the rifle parts were completely produced at the CT factory and assembled at Ilon (nothing is for sure concerning the CT/NY transition). The composite stock does feel more substantial than the composites on my Savage rifles.
 

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I cant say the same for my pair. Having both the XS and the 'X7' ..Remington's long action, my factory syn stocks have practically zero flex to them from the pistol grip forward to the forend tip. The XL-Rem prefers leaving the fore end pressure contact reliefs intact, the XS-JM prefers floating the barrel. I must admit I haven't worked diligently to wring out the best accuracy w/the XL, being that I bought it as a build project.
 
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