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I have a newer model Model 39a that would fail to extract fairly often. After reading tons of material pointing toward the extractor, I found it had absolutely nothing to do with the extractor after all. I examined the situation with a magnifying glass.

I found the problem to be with the cartridge guide spring. Sometimes the smashed edge of the case rim would find its way into the small gap between the chamber and guide spring. You'll know this is happening when you can tap it with a cleaning rod or pry the edge and the case won't move. I would have to push up on the spring toward the receiver roof to let the case free.

The fix: I removed my scope and mount rail so I could get at the guide spring screw in the top of the receiver. I tightened the screw a bit and it solved my problem.

I don't know if the previous owner loosened the screw thinking it was a filler screw for the scope mount, whether it was set wrong from the factory, or if it came loose after two years of light use.

Basically, a hair adjustment can make all the difference in the world with this problem. I don't know how many are out there like this but its not always the extractor.
 

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Thanks Jake for pointing it out and Fast Frank for figuring it out . My 1957 39A was jamming on chamber entry.
Most often on non-jacketed bullets.
Just a little tweak of that cartridge feed guide spring solved all the problem. It was not loose just a little worn/weak from lots of rounds. No problems with FTF or FTE
 
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Jake/Swany

I might have this problem with one of my newer 39As. Could this loose screw problem cause a failure to feed as well as ejection? That screw might be stripped on mine. New ejectors on order and will do that mod also.
 

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Yes.

That screw needs to hold the cartridge guide properly in place or you can have problems both going in and coming out of the chamber.

Fortunately, it's a cheap and easy repair. :D
 

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Great information, Thanks!
 

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yep... me too!

so...

after tweaking the 'paper clip' the other night because of extraction issues with a new 39A, i went out this afternoon and second round fired... no extract
;(

i dug it out and fired another three or four all the same... then i started messing with the screw for the cartridge guide spring, loosened it off and tightened it while looking into the chamber and watching the spring rise and fall.... stopped turning the screw when it looked 'about right' and hey presto!! 50 rounds all perfect... brass flying everywhere

damn its a fun gun to shoot....!

thanks to all who have posted over the last while on the issue... it was a great source of info.... and just love that i was able to figure it out with 'y'all without having to return the gun...
 

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I'm pretty sure this is the exact problem I'm having with my 39A. Was at the range trying to teach my GF the ins and outs of gun safety and shooting in general, twas her first time at the range with me after promising me she'd go for 6 months. And of course, the gun she should be learning on won't extract. Its definitely the guide spring cause after looking closely I can tell the spring is bent down too far into the chamber area and blocking the spent case from ejecting. Its bent down a little passed the rim of the case. Does anyone have a picture of which screw it is that needs to be tightened/loosened? I'll have to take my whole scope set up off to get at it, would be great to have a visual of what I'm supposed to do. I hate the idea of taking my scope off and having to re-sight the gun after I had it shooting sooo well. But alas it has to be done.
 

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The real reason 39A's FTE and FTF

I'm pretty sure this is the exact problem I'm having with my 39A. Was at the range trying to teach my GF the ins and outs of gun safety and shooting in general, twas her first time at the range with me after promising me she'd go for 6 months. And of course, the gun she should be learning on won't extract. Its definitely the guide spring cause after looking closely I can tell the spring is bent down too far into the chamber area and blocking the spent case from ejecting. Its bent down a little passed the rim of the case. Does anyone have a picture of which screw it is that needs to be tightened/loosened? I'll have to take my whole scope set up off to get at it, would be great to have a visual of what I'm supposed to do. I hate the idea of taking my scope off and having to re-sight the gun after I had it shooting sooo well. But alas it has to be done.
TheOde to Marlin 39A. Here are the realreasons for your newer 39A to Fail-To-Fire (FTF) and Fail-To-Extract (FTE) andthe options to “tune” your rifle or have it “tuned” for you. My 39A is now 2 years old and out of the boxits performance was dismal with any brand and level of ammo. As I do not intend to use this in any highend competition, I would prefer it to do well with bulk ammo. Here were the stats with the top 3 bulk ammosellers for each 18 rd load of LRs. ForWinchester bulk I had an average of 10 FTF and 7 FTE. Remington was 7 FTF and 7 FTE. Federal was the best with 5 FTF and 3FTE. The problem is both FTF and FTEshould be 0. Through surfing theinternet and trial-and-failure of most of the suggestions I have found the two mostcommon causes and fixes.

Myfirst try was to shorten the bottom of the “Hammer Rebound Strut”. If you have done any searching and fixing,I’m sure you know what I am talking about. With the first two fixes I am going to suggest you will not need to dothis. I am now using a new unalteredstrut and every round fires with no annoying spring ping after the shot.

Youcan do these fixes yourself if you are handy with tools and are reallycareful. I always make small changes andtest in order to find the stopping point. I alter the cheapest parts to replace first in any attempt to tunethings. You can have a qualifiedgunsmith read what the problem is along with their assessment and fix, or youcan send the 39A back to Marlin (Remington) with an explanation of theproblem. I found that it’s a real gamblesending it back to Marlin and getting a working rifle back.

1. Thefirst thing to check and fix is the “Cartridge Guide Spring”. This is a small spring that is on the insidetop of the receiver that helps guide the next round into the chamber. The problem with the spring is that it sticksdown too far. The first problem causedis that it blocks a spent cartridge from extracting. The second problem, one I have not seen onthe internet, is that it interferes with the firing pin. This is the cause of the many FTF’s and notthe “Hammer Rebound Strut”. I have readwhere some owners have fooled around with the mounting screw that holds this inplace or have bent the spring. Thesefixes may help with FTE, but not with FTF. I experience two things when trying them. First the screw holding the spring is onlylong enough to catch 2 or 3 threads in the spring on a part of the spring thatis a lip created by the hole being stamped. The lip breaks and the screw won’t hold the spring in place. Second, the spring is small and brittle…itbreaks. The real problem with the springis that the slot where it is mounted in the receiver is not deep enough. I used a Dremel tool to carefully ground adeeper channel. This fixed the FTF’sdown to 0 even for the Winchester bulk.

2. Thenext major problem causing FTE was that the bolt was not closingcompletely. I had about .01” gap afterclosing the bolt. When the round wasfired this gap allowed the cartridge to bulge just above the rim, jamming it inthe chamber. You can fix this byeither: 1. Cold hammer the end of thefinger lever were it locks the bolt or 2. Heat up the end of the finger lever were it locks the bold and hammer itslightly to extrude the metal out. Afterextruding you will probably have to use needle files to adjust it so it is nottoo tight. If it is too tight the“Finger Lever Screw” will break.

Thesetwo fixes will probably solve all the FTF’s and FTE’s. I had one more that I did that seems toassure extraction of the most stubborn of brass. I filed the end of the ramp on the barrelwere the extractor sits when the bolt is in lock position. This created a slight notch in the chamberthat allows the extractor to get all the way into the rim. I then filed the ramp itself to make a smoothtransition for the extractor. A resultof the 3 fixes above…0 FTF’s and FTE’s using any type and length of ammo.
 

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I have a newer model Model 39a that would fail to extract fairly often. After reading tons of material pointing toward the extractor, I found it had absolutely nothing to do with the extractor after all. I examined the situation with a magnifying glass.

I found the problem to be with the cartridge guide spring. Sometimes the smashed edge of the case rim would find its way into the small gap between the chamber and guide spring. You'll know this is happening when you can tap it with a cleaning rod or pry the edge and the case won't move. I would have to push up on the spring toward the receiver roof to let the case free.

The fix: I removed my scope and mount rail so I could get at the guide spring screw in the top of the receiver. I tightened the screw a bit and it solved my problem.

I don't know if the previous owner loosened the screw thinking it was a filler screw for the scope mount, whether it was set wrong from the factory, or if it came loose after two years of light use.

Basically, a hair adjustment can make all the difference in the world with this problem. I don't know how many are out there like this but its not always the extractor.
:congrats:
 

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I'm glad I read this. the rifle functioned fine for the 2 years I have been shooting in competition. All with the same ammo. Then all of a sudden it started miss firing and would not eject. First thoughts and reads were the extractor. Then I found this post. I removed the Williams sight and checked and sure enough that screw was loose. I tightened it up and things got worse! Then I watched carefully with magnifying glasses and loosened the screw until the guide was just above the cartridge rim. WALA it worked perfectly. BUT, the screw was 1/3 of a turn loose and I knew it would not stay adjusted. I then tightened it all the way up, took a 90 degree scribe and bent the interfering end up until it cleared the rim of a cartridge. I thought it strange that I could bend a piece of spring steel to stay, but I did. I also don't understand the misfires as the case pushes right past the guide and is solidly against the barrel? Oh well, it is working fine now and I will just have to watch it.
 

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Old post, but excellent advice. My well maintained '57 Mountie developed FTE. I removed and cleaned the cartridge cutoff and cartridge guide springs and beneath the areas they rest in. Problem solved.
 

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Thanks for that valuable info, Benchsite.

It may well be an old post, but if you're new to 39A's, then this is invaluable. Describes perfectly the problems I was having. Bought a 2005 made rifle that the owner quit for those reasons, among others.
I've heard a lot of negative comment about the "new" version, but I have to say that there are some features I like, compared to my 1971 made NRA commemorative; captive firing pin, inspection port to confirm un/loaded chamber, inspection port to confirm empty magazine, but, I don't go much on the rebound hammer or the cross-bolt safety.
Just finished ammo testing session and ten shot groups are consistently less than 15mm - Eley Match (Black). Definitely minute of silhouette material.

49er
 
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