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;D Thanks, I didn't realize that the rifle I bought was being talked about so much, I just hope I'm not holding some kind of unfireable lemon here. I have some little piggy friends that just can't wait to meet the nasty end of this puppy. My brother owned one a few years back, he bought it pretty cheap and sold it for $650, I've missed it a lot, and decided I had to have another one. I shot several hogs with his, and the 375 sure does lay a smack on them.
 

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Congrats on the rifle and Welcome to MO (MarlinOwners)! The oval with the JM in it is the proofmark from Marlin (JM is John Marlin). I know these guys some and myself so I don't think I'm out of line in asking if you could put some pics up of what you're describing. I'm not 100% sure but I believe the actions are the same. Mr fixit
 

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Here are some pics of the cuts and the serial number. Any info would be great. I got kind of worried after reading through this post, then to find out it was about my rifle. Well it is what it is, correct or not, it doesn't look to have been smithed to me, unless someone just did one hell of a clean job on it.

Any of you have any luck with a certain cast bullet in these Marlins? I ordered some 250 gr. .377 gas checked bullets from beartooth. I would like to try some of Ranchdogs 235's, but I have to order them from Bull Shop, in Alaska, unless you guys know where else they can be purchased.

If I find out anything interesting from Marlin I'll be sure and update all of you.

Thanks
 

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Grooves filed in the top of the mag tube and bottom of the barrel indicate a fore arm band. The fact that these grooves are "bright" and not blued, would indicate they were cut after the barrel and mag tube were originally finished and blued; and, as barrel and mag tube grooves are blued on un-altered guns, I suspect these were cut sometime after the gun originally shipped. My 1980 model M375 has no forearm band grooves because they were never cut on models utilizing fore arm caps. Therefore, I am now inclined to think your gun is an after-market M375 whereby someone used a 336 RC as the base gun. I'm thinking that when the barrels were changed out, the original RC forearm was retained, which is why the forearm band grooves had to be cut. Later, the forearm was changed to the cap style and the dovetail cut for the forearm cap; and with the new forearm installed, the after-market grooves would not be visible. Whoever did the conversion appears to have done a really good job, as in your original photos the gun is identical in all respects to the production M375.
 

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.

And in addition to Rachethead's comments, I would have absolutely no concerns about the safety of shooting that gun if it is good operating condition. As we said, there are dozens of these guns that have been converted, rebarreled, or rebored and they are safe with any sane load. Marlin parts list shows the receivers to be the same with the same part number. Our discussion was about the collectibility of the gun in question, safety in shooting the gun was not an issue.

The bore on my Marlin 375 measures .378, so .379 or .380 cast bullets work well. I shoot .380 LaserCast in my gun with 30 grains of 3031. No gas check and no leading.
 

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Well I just got off the phone with Marlin, basically they couldn't confirm or deny anything??? Basically they didn't keep records back then, well nothing detailed at all. They did say that they have instances where they come across serial numbers that don't necessarily coincide with a models introduction year. They also said that it may have been an "un-catalouged" gun, or a special run, or even a prototype. But there would be no way to ever know with any certainty, because of the lack of detailed record keeping. That's all okay by me, I'm not so much of a collector, just a guy that fell in love with this cartridge a few years back, and now I have one again. :)
 

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bdmccall said:
I've located a site that seems to cast just about any bullet for any caliber, he has quite a few selections for .375 caliber stuff too. www.unobtainamite.com or you can find them at www.damnhardtofind.com Rob is whom I've been emailing with and he seems to know his stuff, Check them out, he has some really light plinking bullets too.
I don't buy bullets from some bubba that can't even spell "bullets" ::)

;D ;D
 

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If my reloading books are correct Winchester developed the 375 and put it on the market in 1978. I just went round & round with a guy that said he had a 375 for sale. He posted a picture of the gun and it had mismatched stock & forearm. The stock was checkered but not the forearm. I asked him about the wood and he said the guy he bought it from had broken the forearm. I told him that the 375 didn't come checkered and I asked him what year the gun was made. He wrote back that 2 gunsmiths had said the gun was original and it was made in 1969. I think someone was blowing smoke where the sun don't shine.
 

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With this thread being a year old I am not sure how many will read this from the original post. This is going to blow your mind. I have a 375 marlin serial# 240097xx. It is less than 10 digits from the 375 that was orginaly the start of this thread. I have posted about this gun on two other threads prior to this thread. I am more confused about my 375 than ever.
 

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Who can definitively tell you anything about your serial number oddity? It could be something as simple as a gun being manufactured from an older and earlier numbered frame that got stuck in the back of the parts bin causing the serial number to be outside the normal serial number sequences. Marlin did occasionally build guns outside published serial number ranges, as I had a 450MR with a serial number indicating the gun was manufactured two years before the 450MR was cataloged; but that oddity didn't make the gun worth more dollars, just added to the interest factor! It could also be a re-barreled gun; as Numrich sold original M375 barrels for years that could be retro-fitted to a almost any Model 336 frame; and the only way you could/would know it was/was not original would to be fortunate enough to have the original shipping box serialized to the gun with the correct model number. It is my understanding that Marlin would also re-barrel an older Model 336 in 30/30 with a factory M375 barrel.
As to the question above about stocks; yes all Marlin M375's pre-date the introduction of checkered stocks becoming standard on Marlin levers. But, as so many Marlin lever stocks are interchangeable, stock/forearm replacments are not uncommon. Personally, I didn't like the smooth Mar-shield finished stocks on my M375; so it now proudly wears a set of checkered walnut stocks from a 308MX. If the gun you saw was an original M375, I wouldn't write the piece off my list because of a mis-mathced stock as long as it was priced accordingly.
 

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Rachethead, I think that original left over barrels bought from parts houses will not have proof marks. I think that complete guns are proofed and loose barrels are not. So... if you ever see a rifle that is odd, look to see if it has a JM proof mark. I bought a 20 inch barrel from the original run of the 1894 model called the 1894 OCTAGON, and then I installed it on an old standard carbine 1894 44 mag action to make it more cowboy. The spare barrel that I bought from Numrich had no proof mark at all.
 
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