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I've searched, searched, and searched around and have yet to find a definitive answer on this. Has anyone done any research on this? What's the yardage these elevator sights are set at? Is it by 25 yards, or?
 

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Also, is windage on iron sights just a term or is it a legitimate function? Did people back in the day really sit there tapping away the windage on their iron sights according to the direction the wind was blowing? Wouldn't they take a risk scaring an animal away by firing rounds trying to zero the iron sights for windage? And the number of rounds it would take to zero it back to normal to zero windage?
 

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The elevators aren't calibrated. Shoot at a chosen distance, and raise or lower the sight as required, then leave it alone. There are no windage adjustments on open sights beyond what you described. "Set it and forget it."
 

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I've searched, searched, and searched around and have yet to find a definitive answer on this. Has anyone done any research on this? What's the yardage these elevator sights are set at? Is it by 25 yards, or?
They're not like military rifles, there's no set distance associated with each step. Would be hard to do given the variety of ammo out there. And windage is equally haphazard with the factory-supplied open sights. Adjust it for one load at one distance and learn how the bullet flies at other distances. Take a brass drift and mallet with you, decide what distance you want to sight in at and get your group centered up on the range. If you want to get a little more regular, get a Lyman, Redfield or Williams receiver sight with knobs and click stops. But I guarantee you that a deer just isn't going to stop and let you twiddle with knobs for the right range. Best to learn how your bullets drop at different ranges and aim off.

Stan S.
 

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Another way to shoot long distance with irons, other than hold over. You can zero your rifle for a known distance, say dead on at 100yds. Take a large sheet of paper and draw lines one inch apart horizontally above your bulls eye. Start raising the front sight higher and higher out of the rear sight groove for each shot. Measure how much higher each shot goes, and compare to a ballistic chart. For example, a 30-30 170gr load dead on at 100yds, and you figure out raising the front bead half way out of the groove places the bullet 5 inches high at 100yds, that is equal to dead on at 200yds. So a deer standing at 200yds, pull the bead half way out and aim dead on, instead of 10 inches over. For example 300yds could be the full bead, depends alot on how a person looks thru their sights.
 

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In addition to what Graymustang and other posters have stated, here are a few more tips I have learned that may or may not help you. Buckhorn factory sights are difficult for many, do not get discourage if those are what you want to use. They really do work, but you have to do your part. That involves practice, range time and a log book.

first windage - when windage is adjustable by drifting the sights (using a small hammer and punch) then get them adjusted with no wind at a good manable distance, 50 yrd is good. Accuracy is key, if your off a smidge at 50 yards, then the amount of misadjustment will be much, much greater at further distances. We will not go back and adjust these during the hunt due to wind conditions. That is done from experience and knowing how much the wind is moving your bullet over what distance.

second elevation: many good suggestions in the above posts. There are several good methods. I like seeing a full front bead in the "Vee" of my rear sights. Next, find a good known yardage, 50 yd to start. And practice, practice, practice until you know where that bullet is going every time. I generally sight in at 100 yds and that leaves me on the #2 or 3 notch it seems on the rear elevator. Keeping notes is critical. Then you just need to determine your "hold over" for the distance, i.e holding the bead on the bottom of the belly of the critter, or right in the middle or on the very top of the back to allow for bullet drop etc.
Hope this helpful.

Eli Chaps has some good info in his thread on shooting with open sights:
http://www.marlinowners.com/forum/general-gun-related-off-topic-stuff/81935-iron-sight-picture-thread-info.html
 
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