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A 336 A-DL 32 Winchester Special is on auction in Germany.

Do some of you have some more informations about this type of a 336? What about the starting and buy-now-price?

eGun

Thank you!
 

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EK, first off, the rifle is not a DL (DeLuxe) model. Those had a bit nicer wood and a checkered pistol grip and forearm. If the barrel is actually marked A-DL, the wood has been replaced, OR, the factory made a mistake in stocking it. A correct marking for this rifle would be 336 A. It does seem to be a nice specimen. My only concern is the close up of the left side of the receiver. There seems to be some waves in the metal, BUT I think it is just a reflection of the surface upon which the rifle is resting.

This morning's paper gives an exchange rate of about 1.3 dollars per Euro. That would put the price at $740 USD. I also suspect that the caliber and the model may be somewhat uncommon in Europe and that will affect the value. Over here, at least in the Dallas - Ft. Worth area market, I would expect to see that rifle priced in the $700 range plus or minus, provided the waves on the left are just reflections and the finish is all original. It seems that people here are getting more and more fond of finding unmolested waffle topped receiver Marlins. I hope this information is beneficial to you. Best wishes, jack
 

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I have a 336 A-DL in 35 Rem. Very nice rifle that hates jacketed bullets but loves fat cast bullets.
The 32 Special is a very nice round but harder to find than the 30-30.
Here in the States you should be able to get that under $700 USD. I've seen them go for much less, but these days Marlins get high dollar. It sure looks like it's in nice shape, unmolested waffle top.

Farfenugan prost
Lunar
 

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Elmer Keith??? I read and worshipped his writing in the 50's and 60's. Somehow it just doesn't seem right.

Think that wavy stuff is a reflection from the spackeling on the surface the rifle is laying on. Gun looks super nice. It looks exactly like the A model I have in 35 Rem. Tried to sell mine for $800 once and got no interest. Mine is in unfired, new condition. This one seems to have had a little use but might be worth it if the 32 Special is an attraction to you.

Once you buy something you have it and the moeny is no longer an issue. If you want it, get it. At least you will have somethng of value instead of blowing that much on a few nights at a club where you end up with headaches, memories and little more to show for it.
 

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Marlin 336A.jpg
A 1957-1962 (final year of the 336 A-DL models) would look like the example depicted above with a factory fitted Bishop styled Monte Carlo stock and cheek piece; and an 336 A-DL from this period will typically bring $700 and more, while those from the 1948-1956 period typically bring $200-400 less (depends on condition). A-DL's produced from 1948-1956, won't have the Bishop styled Monte Carlo stocks and generally feature less highly figured walnut. As has been noted, on these early production 336-A and A-DL Marlins, it is not uncommon to find an A-DL with a barrel marked 336-A; and 336-A model with a barrel marked 336-A-DL. We don't know exactly why these barrel markings were used so haphazardly by the gunworks in those days, but we do know that is the case; so whenever one is evaluating an early Model 336-A and/or A-DL, one must consider the other features, besides a barrel stamp, that differentiate and actually serve to determine the correct model.
 

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The seller says made in 1949. Monte Carlo stocks not yet introduced. Nice A-DLs w/o MC stocks $200-400 less than MC? Tell us where. I need some more. jack
 

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Jack
Although I posted the last head's up here on a late vintage 336A-DL in 35 Rem with the Bishop styled Monte Carlo stocks, posted on Gun Broker and sold somewhere north of $800; I can't do your homework, I can only remind posters here that these ADL's are hard to locate and will be available only where they can be found. I can suggest that you monitor the various auction sites; and if you do so on a regular basis, you will occasionally find an ADL for sale. And when you do, you will find a wide ranges of prices. You will find that the early waffle top ADL's do bring less money than do the later vintage guns; and I recall that one of our members here purchased an early well-used example for $250. And not too many months ago, one of our members found a late vintage ADL/35 Rem in a gun or pawn shop in AL and paid less than $500. But my statement above, which is based on spending too much time watching auctions, is generally true. An early ADL (1948-1956) without the highly figured Bishop stocks will typically fetch $450-650 depending on condition; and a later vintage ADL (1957-1962) with its Bishop stocks will typically fetch $650-850 depending on condition (three years ago I saw a late vintage ADL in 35 Rem on Gun Broker with a "but-it-now" of $350; that gun had the original owners initials carved in the cheek panel of the stock, but I would have hit the buy-it-now button had I had an extra $350 at the time!) . I purchased the 1957 vintage 30-30 ADL below in March or April of this year off an on-line gun auction site and paid just over 650; the gun is in great shape with only a little blue wear on the bottom of the frame from being carried, and I felt fortunate to get it at that price 2005-05-11 23.52.29.jpg 2005-05-11 23.52.45.jpg 2005-05-11 23.52.54.jpg 2005-05-11 23.53.38.jpg 2005-05-11 23.54.01.jpg .
 

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Ratchethead, I suppose I was being a trouble maker when I posted. All of us blind hogs find an acorn once in a while. I bought a 20 ga. 870 Saturday for 140 plus tax. It was a nicely finished model without much wear, not an express model that they forgot to polish. And, truthfully, I have just about quit searching Gunbroker and others for deals. At my age, and considering the size of my arsenal, there is just not much point in adding stuff unless it is a rare piece and/or a really good deal. We just do not see the $ spread of anywhere near 400 in our market, condition being equal. Nice A-DL, with or without, are not plentiful.

By the way, compliments on yours. It is nice. jack
 

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Here is an early 336A-DL listed today on Gun Broker. Most likely because it is not roll-stamped "A-DL" on the barrel, it is identified as an "A" model; but it does have the A-DL factory checkered stocks and the A-DL large swivel studs. The owner has started the auction at $475, and I seriously doubt it brings much more than that amount, as this is about tops for an early A-DL in this condition.
 

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Here is an early 336A-DL listed today on Gun Broker. Most likely because it is not roll-stamped "A-DL" on the barrel, it is identified as an "A" model; but it does have the A-DL factory checkered stocks and the A-DL large swivel studs. The owner has started the auction at $475, and I seriously doubt it brings much more than that amount, as this is about tops for an early A-DL in this condition.
Paid $282.50 OTD for my E-series ADL - in similar condition - a couple of years ago. And mine too bears only the A stamp thus:
MODEL 336-A-30-30 CALIBER (line dot line) A-----
Think we need a study of early 336 barrel markings.
 

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Ratchethead, I came clean, now it is your turn. The condition on the referenced A-DL is NOWHERE near the condition on your beautiful gun. Like comparing apples and persimmons. I gave $185 for one in that condition a few years ago. Beaters are usually cheaper, regardless of what they started life as. IMHO, $475 is overpriced for that one. Jack
 

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PB
I never said the early example above was worth $475; only that an example of an early A-DL was available, and that $475 was where the seller started the auction. Personally, I have no interest i the early waffle topped A-DL's, and would pass at $150 unless I knew I could immediately resale the piece. The point of my original post has always been to simply reference, and post here; my observations as regards pricing of the different variations of the Marlin 336 A-DL based on what I observe on the various auction sites, which information is all that is available to me as I haven't seen a 336-A in any of the local gun shops in years; and have NEVER seen a 336 A-DL locally. Which fact, by the way, is why I frequent gun auction sites; as the truth is that auction sites are almost exclusively the only source I have to find the odd and unusual "stuff' that appeals to my tastes. And thanks for the compliments on the A-DL, I'm still waiting for the stars and planets to align so that I can add the 35 Rem version and complete the trio (I do have an example of the hard to find 1973 vintage 336-A in 35 Rem); but again, those pics were posted for illustrative purposes in order to reinforce my points on pricing. That gun certainly wasn't a steal at the price paid, but less than most examples go for; and barring damage to the gun, a price at which I should have no trouble re-cooping in the event of a "have-too" sale situation (a self-imposed "rule" I use to evaluate all my gun purchases). Regards, Tom
 

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Tom (Rachethead), I yield. I finally understand where you are coming from. I completely agree that MC/A-DL examples in nice condition will cost $200-, 400, or even more than the average early A-DL. I suppose I have been fortunate. I have found 9 of my 10 Marlin levers locally. Of all things, the .35 C came from Gunbroker. I ordered my Bee when they were originally announced. My Zipper and three Octagons were local purchases. I kept the best of the Octagons and passed the other two on. One was a .44 and I surely regret parting with it. I did not then realize that it could likely not be replaced easily.

Best wishes in your quest for the piece of the puzzle. I have been chasing the "perfect rifle" for some fifty years now. It is fun. Over and out, jack
 

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Thanks PB; but if I don't get that 35 Rem, it's certainly not the end of the world. I'd have to count but am sure I have 9 or 10 Marlins myself; although my preference is for is short magazine models in different calibers, and in the "SC" and "A" style formats. So obviously you won't have me competing with you for those octagon barreled cowboy models whether chambered in rifle, or pistol calibers; which models by the way, I could have purchased locally had those been of interest. With the exception of examples in 308 and 338MX, all my Marlin 336 levers are from 1985 and earlier; but then, I am rather dated at this point myself. But what makes Marlin collecting interesting is the fact that everyone has different tastes, which is exactly why Marlin has produced so many model and caliber variations; and that of course, is the reason why collecting Marlin rifles can be as frustrating as it is fun because it is very difficult for the average person to "own them all".
 
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