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Thankfully mine is a 1:20 twist.
 

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Before Marlin closed, I was asked to do a test on 44Mag barrels to see if a faster twist (1:20") would perform better than 1:38"..............We had had a number of requests from the field for a 1:20" 44Mag..........


I had 12 barrels made with 1:20" rifling, and assembled into rifles.........

We then chose 6 from the 12, and shot them at 100 yards in controlled conditions against 6 selected 1:38" guns, using both jacketed and commercially cast lead ammo..........

As I recall, (I no longer have the data).............The Jacketed bullets shot the about same in both twists..That is to say, it was difficult to conclusively say the faster twist was beneficial to accuracy............

The cast bullets also shot pretty much the same...........As the cast bullets were commerciall loaded, and not sized to a particular barrel, we selected the two rifles in each twist rate that performed the best with cast ammo, and shot them with jacketed ammo............The results were so close that Marlin R&D decided to continue with the 1:38" twist in 44Mag rifles..............

I suspect, If someone has a 1:20" 44Mag barrel on their rifle, that may be one of the Original test rifles...........Those test rifle would be either late 2007, 2008 or possibley 2009 rifles..I can't recall exactly when the test was requested and the rifles were built. There was a lot going on at Marlin, then......

I recall CalvinMD wanted one of those rifles, and at the time, Marlin would not allow them to be sold, as they were non-standard rifles.
I lost track of those 12 rifles, but I'm about 100% sure they were finally sold by remington, as Marlin came closer to closing the North Haven doors.......

To summarize, I wouldn't care if my 44Mag rifle was 1:20 or 1:38.................


Tom
 

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Thanks Tom, Your input of information is valuable and always worth saving for us collectors.

Jack
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Tomray--Thanks for the info! If I understand correctly, the only 1:20 .44 mag twist guns out there are those from the 12 you had made up for the test.
 

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According to Wikipedia the Marlin 1894S has a 1:20 twist.
It also has microgroove instead of Ballard rifling.
It's listed in the chart at the bottom of the article.

Marlin Model 1894 - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
I can't comment on that, because I don't know................I know the 41 Mag had 1:20 rifling, but I think the wiki info on the 44Mag twist rate may be a typo........But I don't have data to proove that.

Tom
 
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Before Marlin closed, I was asked to do a test on 44Mag barrels to see if a faster twist (1:20") would perform better than 1:38"..............We had had a number of requests from the field for a 1:20" 44Mag..........


I had 12 barrels made with 1:20" rifling, and assembled into rifles.........

We then chose 6 from the 12, and shot them at 100 yards in controlled conditions against 6 selected 1:38" guns, using both jacketed and commercially cast lead ammo..........

As I recall, (I no longer have the data).............The Jacketed bullets shot the about same in both twists..That is to say, it was difficult to conclusively say the faster twist was beneficial to accuracy............

The cast bullets also shot pretty much the same...........As the cast bullets were commerciall loaded, and not sized to a particular barrel, we selected the two rifles in each twist rate that performed the best with cast ammo, and shot them with jacketed ammo............The results were so close that Marlin R&D decided to continue with the 1:38" twist in 44Mag rifles..............

I suspect, If someone has a 1:20" 44Mag barrel on their rifle, that may be one of the Original test rifles...........Those test rifle would be either late 2007, 2008 or possibley 2009 rifles..I can't recall exactly when the test was requested and the rifles were built. There was a lot going on at Marlin, then......

I recall CalvinMD wanted one of those rifles, and at the time, Marlin would not allow them to be sold, as they were non-standard rifles.
I lost track of those 12 rifles, but I'm about 100% sure they were finally sold by remington, as Marlin came closer to closing the North Haven doors.......

To summarize, I wouldn't care if my 44Mag rifle was 1:20 or 1:38.................


Tom
Tom you do not say, but I suspect that 240 grain bullets were used in the test. The question I see most folks asking is the benefit of a fast twist for heavier bullets. Did the test you mention include testing different weight bullets, or was it limited to a 240 grain bullet at 100 yards ?
 

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I can't comment on that, because I don't know................I know the 41 Mag had 1:20 rifling, but I think the wiki info on the 44Mag twist rate may be a typo........But I don't have data to proove that.
Tom

I do know it's claiming that only the 1894s has the 1:20 twist w/microgroove not the regular 1894.
Mine does in fact say microgroove on the barrel. No way for me to measure the twist rate tho.
 

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There are some online articles on how to do it.
It's how they calculate the actual twist that still
confuses me.
 

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Sinclair’s Simple Twist Rate Measurement Method
If are unsure of the twist rate of the barrel, you can measure it yourself in a couple of minutes. You need a good cleaning rod with a rotating handle and a jag with a fairly tight fitting patch. Utilize a rod guide if you are accessing the barrel through the breech or a muzzle guide if you are going to come in from the muzzle end. Make sure the rod rotates freely in the handle under load. Start the patch into the barrel for a few inches and then stop. Put a piece of tape at the back of the rod by the handle (like a flag) or mark the rod in some way. Measure how much of the rod is still protruding from the rod guide. You can either measure from the rod guide or muzzle guide back to the flag or to a spot on the handle. Next, continue to push the rod in until the mark or tape flag has made one complete revolution. Re-measure the amount of rod that is left sticking out of the barrel. Use the same reference marks as you did on the first measurement. Next, subtract this measurement from the first measurement. This number is the twist rate. For example, if the rod has 24 inches remaining at the start and 16 inches remain after making one revolution, you have 8 inches of travel, thus a 1:8 twist barrel.
 
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I will just assume that Wikipedia is correct about the 1:20 rate since you cannot disprove that.
 

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I'm just not interested in arguing with 1 sentence rob, which ought to be his new nick.
 
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The .44 Mag is 1 X 38 the Marlin in .444 Marlin Was changed from a 1 X 38 to a 1 X 20 as said in the early 2000's and should be so today.

If Remington Today would make there Marlin .44 Mag Rifles with a 1 X 20 twist and tighten up the bore size and also have good production Quality going out the door I would seriously look into the purchase of one.
 
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