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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a model 1893 that letters from 1894 it has a 32 inch round barrel but has no markings that say special smokeless steel, Is it or is it not smokless steel and did marlin ship these with out the markings on them to begin with. Thanks for any help.
 

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Norton,
I also own an 1894 production Model 1893. By coincidence, mine is also a special order barrel length at 28", chambered in .32-40 .
The first Model 1893's did not (as you indicate) have the 'Special Smokeless Steel' or 'For Blackpowder' barrel markings, as there was no need to distinguish between the two because Marlin was not chambering any of thier rifles for the then very new smokeless powder cartridges (.30-30, .25-36, and later .32HPS). Before 1895 the only two cartridges offered were .38-55 and .32-40 (both blackpowder loads). They didn't start with the new smokeless cartridges until 1895. At that time they used a stronger steel for the newer higher pressure smokeless loadings.
So, to answer your question, your rifle was made with the softer steel that would later have been marked ' For Blackpowder'.
Also, I'll bet your rifle does not have the 'MODEL 1893' tang markings. I believe they started marking the tangs in late 1894 or early 1895.
Hope this helps.
WB
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Wishbone Thank you for the info.my rifle is a 38-55 two line barrrel address and the tang is a two line MODEL 1893 stamp, also ontop of the reciever is MARLIN SAFTEY the barrel is fine and with 38.5 gr. of swiss 2f behind a 250 gr bullet it is a tack driver with these old eyes. Again thank you for the info.
 

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I'm surprised that your rifle has the tang markings. Mine was shipped from the factory on 11-14-1894. It must have been later in 1894 when Marlin started stamping the tangs with the 'MODEL 1893' designation.
The s/n on mine is 106XXX.

WB
 

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Wishbone,
Like so many other Marlin practices, I think the receivers were made up, and sometimes shipped much later. I see the darndest things as far as markings go. I have one later than your's, (107xxx) and it was shipped in July of 1894! It also doesn't have the rollstamp on the tang.
My guess is your receiver was made up a little earlier than mine, but not shipped until much later in the year.
Hope this helps.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
WB and MM mine was shiped 11-16- 94 serial #112xxx with a case color reciever, round barrel and a half mag. If this info helps . Again thanks..
 

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Wishbone and Buffalo:

I am wondering, how can you tell, to the specific date, when your guns actually left the factory? Is there a source one can consult to find that out?

thanks,
lazer
 

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Lazer....you can contact the Cody Firearms Museum in Cody, WY with your serial # and they will give you a letter for $40 or $50 that has the information on your rifle. Or you can jpin the Marlin Collectors Assoc. for $25 and get the same info. No letter, but the same info.

http://www.marlin-collectors.com./

max
 

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The great thing about MFCA, is for your $25 membership, you get unlimited info! Not just one letter for $50, or even $25, but free info for as long as you're a member!
 

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Dang! All the years I've belonged, and I never knew that!! I gotta start reading the newsletter! :oops: SW
 

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Max, MM93:

Thanks much. I'll have to consider joining and (SW) paying attention to the newsletter!

Wonder still, though, how is that these organizations have that information, which I presume originally or still resides at Marlin? Is this Marlin's way of deflecting inquiries?

Also, any idea how comprehensive their data bases are? All models? Prior to what year?

Thanks again. Learning a lot from you guys,
lazer
 

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Lazer,
The info that MFCA has, is the same info that Marlin shipped to the Cody Museum. Marlin used to send out their own letters to customers, but decided it was a hassle, and stopped. At the time they stopped, they gave all records to the Buffalo Bill Historical Center in Cody. Later the Marlin Collectors asked for a copy of the old records, and Marlin obliged, with the understanding that these records would not be copied and distributed. They offer this as a service to paid dues members.
The information covers Marlin firearms built from about serial number 4,000 (1883) to serial number 355, 300 (1906)
If you have a gun made during this time it usually will show in the records. But there are exceptions! The information on some firearms is blank. I have an 1892 deluxe rifle, and althuogh the serial number is there, and it contains a date, the info is blank! Some have theorized that guns picked up at the factory, and not shipped, were left blank. Part of this theory involves the fact that Marlin never entered the manufacture date in the records, but rather the ship date. So if a gun was picked up, then it would not have a ship date, and shipping info about the configuration would not be neccessary. I know of two other guns that the history was well documented as to them being picked up at the factory, and they show blanks also, so the theory has some basis, although not enough to really say for sure.
As for info in the records; it is very small! The ship date, straight or pistol grip stock, barrel length and shape, and caliber, are about the most you get. Even very special guns with engraving, elaborate checkering, gold plating, etc. are never listed in the records. Often the features that are usually listed, may not all show. On occasion the info doesn't match at all, due to someone filling in for the regular recording secretary, and not being sure, or marking it down wrong. A good example is a model like the 1892 being recorded as a .38 caliber. We know they never made one, and it's probably a .32, but the person writing it down didn't know. Sometimes they even marked two guns with the same serial number. Unless someone comes up with two identically serial numbered guns, we'll never know if two exist.
Ballards also had serial numbers often duplicated, as they used numbers under the JM Marlin and Marlin Firearms Co. names. I have a Ballard that shows in Brophy's book as a #6 in .38-55, but mine is a #2 in .32 Long. Mine is a JM Marlin, while the other I assume is a Marlin Firearms Co. rifle.
Hope this long winded explantion hasn't bored you or put the forum to sleep! The lack of info is part of what makes it interesting. As I always say, "Nothing is for certain with Marlins, or firearms in general."
 

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MM93

As always, thanks.

That was very instructive and fascinating. Others may be bored, but not me. Whether its my Marlins, or any of the other special rifles I have acquired, it is interesting to try to find out about their history. In most cases, its a dead-end, but its fun learning, even speculating or getting folks who have a much better sense of gun history to speculate.

I shot my Marlin 27S this weekend and unfortunately it jams. Problem appears to be in the magazaine, or at the magazine-carrier interface. The round seems stuck or obstructed at the end of the magazine, though I could not see any problem. Had to unload from front of the magazine and then coax the last round back, up and out of the receiver. Used a small screwdriver to try to catch the front edge of the rim and whatever I did, that puppy came flying out. So, I don't think its the mag spring, which seemed to have plenty of tension. May just be a slight burr or nick at the back of the magazine tube.

The rifle shot fine by single loading, but I will have to figure out why the cartridges won't cycle.

Did take the opportunity when I had it apart to remove the stock and sure enough found the five digit serial number right there on the left tang, where you all said it would be. Now the fun begins. I suspect it's a mid-20s or 30s gun.

Hope I can get her to cycle. Very nice little gun and a really fun round to shoot in .25-20.

Also shot the 1893, .30-30 takedown, which fired and cycled fine. Lots of fun shooting that gun also, which is just shy of 100 years old! Love that old, long octagon barrel and long bolt and action. A treat just to hold, but a real delight to shoulder and shoot.

Thanks again,
lazer
 

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Lazer,
If you break the gun into two halves, you can then pull the outter magazine tube forward. At this point, take a Qtip and run it inside the mag tube opening. If there's any rough spots, the Qtip will catch, and leave fiber where the burr is. You can then use a polishing tip on a Dremel, and polish the burr off. Double check afterwards with the Qtip again, and remove all burrs.
If that doesn't solve the problem, you may have too much wear on the carrier, and it may not be clearing the tube, to allow the next cartridge to enter the carrier.
Hope this helps.
 

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MM93,

I was thinking along those lines, but your specific recommendations are most appreciated. I will try and let ya know. I figured the other problem might be the carrier, but at first glance I don't see that it is hanging up the cartridge anywhere. As I said, I was pretty tired and just wanted to get the live round out and safe the gun. Next chance I get I will examine in great detail and hopefully find a cause that can be remedied.

Thanks,
lazer
 
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