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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi Guys I have an 1893 circa 1910 Marlin and broke the flatspring mainspring. My LGS ordered a replacement for me that is made of a wire outline (the whole thing is formed from the wire) that is approx the right size, from Numrich that they insist is the right spring # 416170C The hole for the screw is much bigger, and would need a washer to fasten down
Has anyone used this part with success ?

Thanks
 

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For $10 bucks I'd sure give it a try. Hammer pressure on the sear & "snap" on the primer will be easy to regulate as well with a little trial & error shimming under the spring.
 

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Wisners won't ship to Canada. Your chocolate Jesus, the current C.I.C. and Homeland Security have made it impossible for us in the frozen north to import tons of gun parts we need for our sport. U.S. ITAR rules prohibit gun parts sales to Canada unless the Manufacturer buy's a permit (last I heard It was $3500 per yr). They would have to sell a ton of springs to us to make it worth while.

Not totally blaming the U.S. govt either as our former Liberal govt had a reputation of harboring terrorist sympathizers hell bent on disrupting your peace.

Maybe well intended, but I don't think it will keep a Kalashnikov out of the hands of any determined terrorist, it sure puts a damper on us guys up here that just want to fix our old guns up a bit.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 · (Edited)
Fingers sad but true. I didnt realize how lucky I was in the past to import repair parts and reloading components from US.
To possibly describe the Numrich substitute mainspring better , It looks like a large safety pin , with the end opposite the fastening screw hole bent upward to contact the hammer
I cant copy and paste the picture for some reason
 

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I had a look at it on their site. They have models for a large # of old Marlins so I would expect Numrich to de-list/stop selling them if they don't work.
 

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Another Canuck here with a model 1893 question. I have a 38-55 made in 1894 that the half cock safety releases with a slight touch of the trigger. It also has a head space problem with fired protruding primers, just wondering if there is an easy fix for either problem or are they related at all? Can the headspace problem be rectified in the reloading of the cases?
 

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Another Canuck here with a model 1893 question. I have a 38-55 made in 1894 that the half cock safety releases with a slight touch of the trigger. It also has a head space problem with fired protruding primers, just wondering if there is an easy fix for either problem or are they related at all? Can the headspace problem be rectified in the reloading of the cases?
I had the same issue with mine. Since the bore was marginal, I sent it out for a reline, but I was surprised when the problem still was there. Then I found several other issues, a broken firing pin, weak extractor and main spring. Also, low pressure loads will cause the primers to back out. Anyhow, I finally corrected the problem, start with the small stuff and work from there.
The half cock notch on the hammer is probably worn, too. Numrich should have all the parts you may need.
 

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The bore is mint and has a 30" barrel and other than the 2 issues i have mentioned it is a great rifle. I was shooting a light load of Unique in it so i might try stepping that up a might and see if that helps with the primer problem.
 

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Thanks Big Al for the tip on the spring. Too bad about the re-line job not correcting your headspace problem. You may be the victim of the second big bugaboo of not installing a liner with a friction fit at the chamber for center fire cartridges. While I covered the first bugaboo in another thread (93 need input on re-bore), your comment reminded me of another problem I've seen.
The gun was a 32 Sp 94 Win that had been lined with the same method as a rim fire, just drilled and the liner locked in with the locking compound. In this case, without the extra pressure control gained by the friction fit helping the compound do its job, after a very few firings the pressure between the bolt head/case base and bullet as it traveled down the bore started the liner to "walk" in the barrel, opening up headspace as it moved. I was told that only after a half dozen shots, and before the problem was noticed, the liner had moved enough to keep the firing pin from hitting the primer. If that's your problem it's very easy to spot, the liner will start to protrude from the muzzle end. If your doesn't ,then you are just the unfortunate victim of a poor chambering job.

Hopefully I'm not discouraging anybody from getting a barrel re-lined, not what I'm trying to do. I have three relined guns and four more waiting to be done myself. A well done liner job will make a lot of 100 yr old guns shoot like new & in some cases, better than when new.
 

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The half cock notch in the hammer needs to be re-ground deeper & the sear angle corrected at the same time. Easy to do, an hour with an Arkansas stone and the hammer in a vice.

Unfortunatly your headspace problem requires a bit more work than just changing the load. By increasing the load, all you will do is increase the beating your action internals will be taking. True, the primers will be embedded back in the cases but the headspace is still there.

Let's start with how much measured primer protrusion is there. In modern high pressure guns very little head space will cause brass splitting or rupturing...not the case with some of the older rimmed cartridges that only produce 25,000 lbs or so, the brass will still do its job. Personaly I don't get worried about headspace in these old girls until I can measure at least 15 thou primer protrusion after firing an empty case with just a new primer in it, no bullet or powder, just the primer. At 10-15 thou I always keep the loads at the bottom end of the scale (as you are using now) for that particular caliber.

If the headspace is excessive in your gun and needs to be fixed, you have two choises...re-line or turn in one full turn to index the barrel dovetails &re-chamber. Both have their benefits/drawbacks to be considered.
Relining keeps your original barrel dovetails all lined up with the mag tube & forestock mount but in the case of the 38-55, it needs to be securely locked in place.
You say the bore is very good yet, so option # 2 is viable as well. It requires the barrel to be cut & turned in one full turn and re-chambered with correct headspace. Unfortunately with this method, the mag tube and forestock must be shortened a corresponding amount to match dovetail cuts, changing the original spec's of the old gun.
 
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