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Marlin 1889 Finger Lever Catch Spring? II

I just registered on this forum and am not sure how this works but here it goes.
I have an 1889 marlin in 38-40 I pulled the butt stock of and reassembled it the finger lever catch just sort of dangles there I removed the butt stock and I see there must be a spring there that I lost .What I need is a spring or at least a good photo of one so I can reproduce it. Hope there is some one that can help.
 

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Thank you. I did see a listing on Numrich but it is not available at this time, also has a diagram but not clear enough for me to see to try in make one. Any suggestions are welcome.

O.K. Jim here it is. This is a photograph for you of a finger lever catch spring that I removed from one of my Marlin models of 1889. I have applied the dimensions with ball point pen as you will see.........



The narrower aspect of the spring or the leg of the 'T' if you wish and which measures 0.177" wide is humped up in it's central aspect the hump being directed toward the upper tang. Just a little hump, probably bringing it about a millimetre off the lower tang. The measurement of 0.602" for the narrow aspect of this spring incorporates the hump. In other words it's that length of 0.602" with the hump in place. The end of the leg of the 'T' presses on the finger lever catch. The thickness of the spring is 0.024" thick.

So now you have these dimensions find some spring steel of a little more than 0.024" thick and file or grind it down to that thickness. Your stock might be from an old flat rifle magazine spring or an old clock or even a hacksaw blade but you will have to thin it quite a bit as you will have to do if you get some spring stock from Brownell's. Once you've got a piece of suitable spring stock about 2"X 1" you must anneal it to soften it to allow you to work it. Heat the work preferably with a carburizing flame (oxyacetylene) but a propane torch will work too. Take it to red hot which will be about 1600 degrees C I think and then let it cool down slowly in air. In it's softened state you can now cut it, and file it to shape, using my dimensions, with a dremel tool. Put the 'hump' in the narrower part by bending it upwards perhaps between two needle nose pliers. Now polish the entire work with wet and dry sandpaper going down to perhaps 600 grit. There must be no file marks or sanding streaks at all or the spring will fracture at one of these imperfections.Try a fit into the rifle dove tail to assure yourself it's going to fit. You might have to file it some more but never forget to take those marks out with your sandpaper. Now you have to harden your new spring by heating it again to red hot but this time you're going to cool it quickly by quenching it in cold motor oil. The work now is very hard but very brittle and you must now draw the temper back to give it 'spring'. Take a piece of quarter inch plate steel a little (a few inches) bigger than your work and clamp the steel plate in a vice and place your work on top of it so that you're looking down on it. Now play your flame under the plate steel so that your new spring gets hot on top of the plate. Here's the good part...... watch your new spring just like a hawk as you play the flame from below. When the spring reaches about 700 degrees Celsius it will suddenly begin to change it's colour from the darkened one attributable to your hardening process to a lilac blue type of colour rather similar to that seen on screws which have been nitre blued if you're familiar with those? This colour change happens very suddenly and then it's over and it's too late. Just as it's changing colour pick it up with needle nose pliers and cool it quickly again in the same cold engine oil you used before. You have a new Model 1889 finger lever catch spring with a correct temper. The beauty of this is that if you botch the colour change you can anneal and harden and temper that piece of metal again and again as many times as you like.

good luck. I hope this helps you some.
 

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smithywess

You, sir, are a genius! And a very helpful one at that!

It was raining today so I decided to follow your plan to make a lever catch spring for my old 1889 38-40. I used a hacksaw blade as you suggested. It WORKED PERFECTLY!

THANK YOU, THANK YOU, THANK YOU!
 

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