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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all!

I am a new owner of an old Marlin 81DL. It has the 12R peep sight and I have some questions about the sight which I hope to get help with.

From postings here and at RimfireCentral I believe the gun is 1941-1950 vintage. 5-rifle grooves (Ballard) model stamp reads 81DL -------- A; no other date code stamping at the receiver; no scope mounting groves or taps on the receiver.
The peep sight windage adjustment is a lever rather than a screw; elevation adjustment is a knurled knob/disc; aperture is a knurled disc.

Overall the gun is in great shape; shiny barrel (interior); good bluing; good wood (maple in appearance) and I am really looking forward to my next range session!!

So here are the questions:
  1. the elevation knob appears to just tighten/loosen so the sight can be moved along an arc with graduations marked on it. Is that correct?
  2. and is it standard lefty-loosie? (mine is frozen and I don't want to try and force it without knowing)?
  3. I presume the aperture disk is threaded in, correct?
  4. aperture disk thread size? lefty-loosie? (it too is frozen)
  5. the windage appears to be a lever/cam or lever/thread-used-as-a-cam... again, frozen, so is it lefty loosie?
  6. any tips for unfreezing these threaded parts?
  7. last one, any tips regarding the gradations on elevation and windage? windage is set (& frozen) at the middle mark; elevation is set (&frozen) at the rightmost mark.
fyi there is very little visible rust anywhere on the gun or these parts in particular.

Thanks in advance for any help (especially on #6!!).
 

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Every bolt is standard "lefty loosie", there are no left handed threads on the sight.
#1 - Correct
#2 - Yes
#3 - Yes
#4 - Thread size 10-40
#5 - Yes
#6 - Let soak in a good penetrating oil. I use PB Blaster, available just about anywhere.
#7 - I have an 80, an 81, and a 25 all with the 12R peep. There doesn't really seem to be any consistency between the rifles and the graduations on the sight. There may be guidelines out there, but I haven't seen them.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks Klewless. I had WD-40 on hand and that did the trick for the most part. Now knowing which way they turned I used vice grips with the jaws wrapped in duct tape to increase my grip and leverage. I can now easily adjust the elevation and remove/re-install the aperture. The windage lever moves but the flat plate under needs more soaking time.
 

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Welcome to MO mike from Micanopy Florida. As you have already learned there is someone here like Klewless that can answer about any question you will ever have about Marlins and guns in general for the most part.
 

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Golpphin is right. Lots of helpful, friendly people here. You are going to enjoy that 81, my ballard cut rifles are my favorite to shoot. When you get a chance, post some pics, it's what keeps us addicts going.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I spent the day cleaning the rifle. Going over it in detail I wire brushed a lot of dried/oxidized grease from the cartridge carrier and trigger. Got the windage and elevation both freed-up as well. The bolt has been degunked but not disassembled yet.

It's off to the range tomorrow and if I can remember the camera maybe I will get some Picts then.

I noticed that the stock was not done properly. The forearm sling stud, the milled slot for the trigger is offset as is the trigger guard. I found a posting elsewhere with the same issues. I don't plan to fix anything just yet however.

The wood is almost perfect with few dings and scratches ( mostly confined to the varnish). It has a nice patina at the grip and forearm from handling which I would like to keep. I prefer old guns to look old and well handled; old mind you not beat up.

I am ambivalent about fixing build errors like the offset sling stud. This was an inexpensive gun for a working man; these flaws reinforce that part of the guns history. On the other hand if the trigger rubs the wood that will need addressing.
 

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I spent the day cleaning the rifle. Going over it in detail I wire brushed a lot of dried/oxidized grease from the cartridge carrier and trigger. Got the windage and elevation both freed-up as well. The bolt has been degunked but not disassembled yet.

It's off to the range tomorrow and if I can remember the camera maybe I will get some Picts then.

I noticed that the stock was not done properly. The forearm sling stud, the milled slot for the trigger is offset as is the trigger guard. I found a posting elsewhere with the same issues. I don't plan to fix anything just yet however.

The wood is almost perfect with few dings and scratches ( mostly confined to the varnish). It has a nice patina at the grip and forearm from handling which I would like to keep. I prefer old guns to look old and well handled; old mind you not beat up.

I am ambivalent about fixing build errors like the offset sling stud. This was an inexpensive gun for a working man; these flaws reinforce that part of the guns history. On the other hand if the trigger rubs the wood that will need addressing.
Unless the bolt is inoperable after a good cleaning or has a broken part/s I would not attempt dis-assembly. I've never attempted to take one apart, but I've read they are difficult to work on. Somewhere I saw a reference to a Gun Digest article by JB Wood that had a guide for the Marlin bolts. just my 2 cents
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thanks, I have heard that about the bolt. It functions fine so I'll put a strip down of the bolt off until there is a need.
 
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