Marlin Firearms Forum banner
1 - 5 of 5 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
839 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Alright I got a set of Mangrates from my brother the Christmas before last and I've had nothing but trouble with them. As far as cooking on them goes, man they are sweet. For those not familiar with this product the are really heavy cast iron grill grates, google and have a look. I seasoned them up just as I would anything else made of cast iron that I cook with. At first everything went just fine, but after about 8-9 months they started to get a little surface rust on some of the nooks and crannies. As point of maintenance after each use I would brush them down with a stainless grill brush while still hot then hose them down with some cooking spray. This method has worked for years on frying pans and muffin tins. After catching the surface rust I roughed up the areas with a green scratch pad and went back through my pre-seasoning ritual with them. Well that didn't take at all. More serious rust after the next use. So I said screw it and let them sit for a month or two and then set them in the oven for self clean cycle to burn off the remaining seasoning. After they cooled I set about with a dremel to the rusty areas and came out with clean cast iron. I then changed up my seasoning process and slathered them up with peanut oil and did everything more. More oiling, more cycles in the oven, and these little jokers looked way better coming out. I even incorporated a second oiling after cooking with them and they had cooled down, just to make sure the residual heat hadn't burnt off the first go round. Now three months later I'm back in the same boat and severely pissed.

I have zero desire/willpower to duplicate the dremel experience again, my hands felt like I was holding a beehive for days, and was launching rust out my nose for about the same amount of time. After doing some searching on the internet I saw a nifty rust removal trick involving baking soda, water, and battery trickle charger that I can swing. My next concern is how to season these bad mother truckers. I'm tempted to do what we did when I work at a Mexican restaurant with the fajita plates. We threw a pile on a four burner gas cook top, let them get damn near red hot, and then dunked them in the fryer. I'm a little goosey about that as I remember some flaming up a bit and would want to duplicate that in my driveway with my turkey fryer. Any ideas from the MO brain trust? I'm half tempted to sell them for scrap, but don't want to explain that to my brother.

Thanks!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
839 Posts
Discussion Starter · #2 ·
So no one has any ultra foolproof cast iron seasoning ideas?? I'd have figure somebody would have come up with something. Like maybe "Schmaltz, you gotta use schmaltz! And a low heat for hours." Well plan boiling oil and cherry red cast iron got pushed off til next week, maybe something in the mean time.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,496 Posts
Hey Mark. I don't think there is any fool proof way to keep 'em completely rust free. For cast iron grates I try to keep 'em oiled up with olive oil spray. For my camp ovens that I use in the fire pit I use cooking oil on the inside and lanolin seems to work well on the out side.

Other than that, I try to keep an eye on 'em for rust if they're not being used for a while.

Cheers,
Mark.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Reicher

·
Registered
Joined
·
839 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Well the electrolysis method of rust removal is insanely awesome. I'll post pics later, but those things came out looking better than new. I wish I read more info on the process before I started, because the first 3 or 4 things I read said use a lower amperage battery charger. After a little more searching came across some info that used more of the soda per gallon and was full speed ahead with the charging amperage. The first grate took almost 10 hours and was the most heavily rusted. After upping the solution and juice the next one took around 2.5 hours. Really neat trick.

I seasoned using a modified variation of what I originally posted. I got one of those disposable aluminum roasting pans, filled it with enough oil to cover a grate, heated cold grate in oven at 350F for a couple of hours. In the last 15 minutes or so I positioned the roasting pan on my grill and fired it off on low, let it run (ended up in the 220-250 range) cutoff the gas,and dropped in the hot grate. Let soak for ~30 minutes dried off and repeated 5 times so far and they are looking good. I'll probably keep these jokers inside in between grilling just to prevent any rusting reoccurrences.

If you guys have or come across some cast iron,or steel tools for that matter, with significant rusting I can't say enough how well this works. My biggest outlay was the battery charger, but I had been wanting one so it wasn't an expense I worried about to much. The only real elbow grease was from scrubbing the old rusted areas that turn jet black with a green scotch brite pad under some running water, and that didn't take much.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Oz

·
Registered
Joined
·
839 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 · (Edited)
Alright here is the grate before electrolysis
Brown Wood Line Wood stain Caramel color

After electrolysis
Electronic device Metal

The setup

Wood Technology Hardwood Wire Electrical wiring

The positive is hooked to the rebar pieces and the negative is hooked to the rusty piece. I used the rebar tying wire to hold the rebar to the container and 10 gauge stranded copper to daisy chain them all in circuit.

Here is the setup in action

Automotive exterior Bumper Auto part Rim Glass

And the grate now seasoned

Metal Steel Grille
 
1 - 5 of 5 Posts
Top