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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Someone here sent me an e-mail asking how I refinsihed a Marlin 336 stock and forearm. Somehow, I lost it before I could reply.

Who was the poster????? :oops:

I'll be glad to help, but don't know who it was.

L.W.
 

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It was me... :)

I also found a little surface rust between the feed tube and barrel. Any Ideas... I'm doing this for the first time (refinsihing, fixing up surface stuff). Thanks for any help.
 

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chad1043 said:
It was me... :)

I also found a little surface rust between the feed tube and barrel. Any Ideas... I'm doing this for the first time (refinsihing, fixing up surface stuff). Thanks for any help.
To remove surface rust, use 0000 steel wool and a very thin oil. Sewing machine oil is good. Some use Hoppes # 9. Just rub with the steel wool soaked in the oil. If you don't rub too long or too hard won't remove bluing, but it will remove the rust and smooth and blend in the bluing.

When you finish it is CRUCIAL that you remove all of the "hairs" from the steel wool. I use a tack cloth followed by a strong magnet.

For the wood, depends upon how much of the original finish you want to remove. If it's in good shape and you want to steam out minor dings and dents, a mineral spirits soaked cloth works quite well to remove grit, grime, and a minimum of the original finish.

For finishing the easiest and quickest is Birchwood Casey Tru Oil. It's a linseed oil based finish and protects well. Some don't like the look and if that's the case, Tung Oil is an alternative. I perfer % 100 Pure Tung Oil rubbed in by hand. Now, that is NOT the typical Tung Oil type finishes you'll find at the common sources, but pure unadultrated Tung Oil from the Tung tree. It should be diluted for the first couple of coats and then applied full strength for a couple of final coats. It does take longer to do this as it requires sometimes several days for the coats to fully penetrate.

That's my methods, but I'm sure you'll have other suggestions, so you'll have a choice....
 

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Chug,
He was answering me...

Lone,
Thanks. I will be taking all of the finish off and using tru oil. If I go the Tung Oil way... Could you post a few pics of how it turned out? Thanks

Chad
 

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Okay, thanks, Chad

Hey Lone,

You might consider the "South African Express" Kit from Brownell. The kit is about $30. I'll be glad to send you the cover page from the kit that describes the oils they use. You can be the judge of how shinny or deep you want the finish. I love it. I will be glad to send you a picture and the cover page via PM if you like. PM me if interested.

Chug
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Chug, thanks, but as Chad said, I was going to tell him how I refinished my old (1976) 336.

Chad, here's a suggestion on taking off rust without having to worry about the fine steel wool hairs. I saw this on a documentary, years ago, about how the restorers at one of the big museums back east work on their rusted firearms.

Make a loose paste of pumice powder (hobby shops, usually) and very lightweight motor oil. (The pumice powder is actually very finely ground lava glass.) Rub it on the rust until the rust is gone. Use a soft cotton cloth. If you're careful, you'll not damage the metal and you can then use some cold blue to hit those spots, if you like. I've found it to be easy, and non-damaging to the metal.

As stated above, Casey's Birchwood Tru Oil is easy to work with and makes for a nice finish.

I take off the old finish, then raise any dents with soldering iron over a very damp piece of cotton cloth.

When dry, sand the stock, using 200 grit, then begin with a Casey stock filler liquid mixed with 3 to 1, filler to paint thinner or mineral spirits. Then sand. Let dry for 24 to 36 hours. Repeat this three or four times, then I mix Tru Oil with Marine Spar Varnish, and paint thinner or mineral spirits. 1-1-2. I use a good bristle brush to apply thinly. Let dry. Sand again. By now, I'm using 400 grit and will go to 600 grit as I progress

I'll do this for as many coats as it takes to get the "look" I want. I like that Marine Spar Varnish because I use my Marlin sometimes in the rain and snow and I think it gives the wood more protection. Just my opinion.

Main trick is to let the coats dry thoroughly between sandings and new coats. Don't get in a hurry.

IF the color of the forearm does not match the color of the stock, (very possible) you can buy some Min-Wax stain (walnut, red oak, etc.) at the paint store to match one or the other pieces of wood. It'll take some experimenting but you can do it.

I use satin finish for all the above liquids, as I don't want a "shiny" rifle.

I think I have an old pix of my Marlin and if I can find it, I'll post it.

Good luck.

L.W.
 

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Thanks lone. I have the stock sanded down already. Will be headed to the store for some Tru-Oil... Will the 3 Oz be enough or should I plan on more? I used the steel wool and got of most of the surface rust off. Thanks and I can't wait to see the pics...

Chad
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Chad, the regular 3 oz. bottle will do fine. As I said, I mix that with a mixture of mineral spirits and Marine Spar Varnish.

I apply very thinly, then allow it to dry completely, and then sand and apply again.

I believe the thin coats are better than a couple of thick coats.

Of course, as stated above, one can buy the refinishing kit from Brownell's but I already had some of it on hand, so just made my own.

Still haven't found my pix of the Marlin I refinished. Will have to dig out my digital camera and take another, I suppose. I delete pix from my files and camera after awhile.

Refinishing is quite easy, in my opinion. It is mainly lots of elbow grease and patience, more than anything else. :)

Good luck. L.W.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Found a pix of my refinished 1976 336 .30-30!! Old account. Not the best photographer in the world, so this will have to do.



As I said, I like the satin finish, rather than the "shiny" finish. :D

It should be noted that over the years since I bought it, it had got some "real" character dings, scratches, and wear, from my use of it. I thought it turned out pretty well.

As you can see, I have the sling swivels on mine. I like a sling.

I also have a Willliams 5D receiver sight but had not remounted it when I took this picture. It's on there now, however.

L.W.
 

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Thanks for all the advice. I have started the process... I will post pics when I'm done. Like I said, The gun itself has some small old age issues (visual), but I think that as my first Marlin, it will be a good gun. A good gun to start with that is. The money is already piling up for the 1895GS... So the maddness has already started...

Getting my hands dirty with this stuff is so much fun... I might try rebluing this rifle just to see if I can get it to look good... Maybe, maybe not...

Chad

P.S. Thanks to Lonewolf for all the advice and even a pic...
 
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