Marlin Firearms Forum banner

1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
394 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Awright, let's see if anyone has an answer for this.........when the outer magazine tube is withdrawn, it catches on a lip pressed into the inner tube so you can safely drop your cartridges into the loading port. Now, is there a right or wrong way to release the outer tube when loading is completed, or, is a gentle rap on the tube all that is required?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,586 Posts
I usually just pull the outer tube back with my fingers, on my model 20, which has the same mag tube system. As far as right or wrong- I dunno!
I keep an eye to minimizing wear on it, as replacement parts are pretty well nil. I found pushing on the latch end to take a bite of finger skin while pushing it home, so I generally avoid that...

Regards,

Doc Sharptail
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
272 Posts
I would guess either way is RIGHT.Consider yourselves lucky,because I have owned several that will not stay open by themselves due to wear.Makes for an interesting loading problem at times.Presently,I own a model 38 that has the same loading tube.I was under the impression they had the later type tubes.Shows you how wrong MOST books are.Safety first FUN second..Shoot straight..modoc
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
7,244 Posts
Since the outter tube catches on the little notch in the inner tube, it wears over the years. It's an easy fix to take a triangle file, and freshen up the notch a bit to make a clean square edge. Unfortunately, the old catalogs didn't give any tips on how to close the tube in any certain fashion, they just said to "push it closed."
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,591 Posts
It's one of the poorer magazine hold-open features I've seen. But it was cheep to make, so they stayed with it. I guess at the time they figured folks wouldn't mind holding the rifle between the knees, using both arms to load the mag tube when parts wore out of spec.

Ya gotta love the 27-S otherwise, though!! SW
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
394 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Doc, I did as you suggested today. As the 'Hogger mentioned, it is a poor way to hold the tube open. My rifle has a good sharp notch on the tube, but I am inclined to save wear and tear. Off my sandbag, she groups fine, 10 shots in 2" at 50 yards, BUT.......the group is centered about 4" above the point of aim. I removed the sight elevator and lowered the little sliding thingy all the way down, too. It appears to have the original ivory bead and I would hate to mess with it. I also tried out my new Auto Ordnance 1911A1. It is a real jewel, especially after all the needle filing and stoning I did before and after I shot it! The price was right, but I kinda figured that I would need to do some handwork on it. Being a Small Arms Instructor for 20 years in the Navy allowed me to shoot thousands of rounds of .45 auto. When I was stationed at Whidbey Island, my favorite carry gun was a near-mint USS 1911A1. I even checked the serial number to see if the slide matched the receiver. The markings were still sharp, as though it hadn't gone through a refurbishing.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
111 Posts
About all the old 1897 and 1892 rifles I have owned I have taken apart the magazine and cleaned it and sharpened up the notch if need be. Often it doesn't need to be sharpened up though, as it is often old crud just ahead of it and in the notch itself that prevents the little bend in the outer tube from doing its job of holding the outer mag tube up. It isn't a minor job to take these tubes apart, and you have to be careful removeing that little pin up front that the latch pivots on, as well as not letting the other half of the latch mechanism fly out once you have the knurled end removed and the tube retaining screw removed. If you don't know what you are doing it is easy to put a kink in the spring or break something. A lot of old tubes have evidence of welding or soldering on the end of the outer tube that retains the follower when you pull up the tube for loading. I think this was less from wear and more from people not understanding how to take these apart and just yanking the follower out past its little retaining dimple in the outer mag tube. That tore out the dimple and ruined the tube! With proper care though, these tubes seem to last pretty well.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,586 Posts
If you are 4" high at 50, I suspect warm ammo- perhaps overly so. Remember these old pumps were designed around black powder, and semi-smokeless powder loads- around the 1050-1100 fps range. I suspect, but have no proof, that the twist in these rifles are a little slow as well. My 20 seems right at home with the CB long, with the rear sight pegged at about halfway of it's adjustment.... and my sight in zero is at 25 yds- keeps me good for grouse shots between 15 and 85 yds.

Depends too, where you rest the rifle on the bags. Mine shoots poorly using the slide handle as a resting point. I've had best results resting the front bottom edge of the receiver on a soft gun case draped over the bags. She seems to shoot away from P.O.A. with-out something soft covering the bags...

Regards,

Doc Sharptail
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
394 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Hi Doc,
The sight elevator has been filed down quite a bit to allow the sighting 'V' notch to be free of impediments. It was like that when I bought the rifle. My load came from the Lyman Cast Bullet Handbook. In fact, they used a 27-S when evaluating their loads. Lyman shows 4.2 to 5.5 grains of Unique with a hardcast 115 grain bullet. This spectrum yielded velocities between 1110 and 1390 FPS. My load was 4.5 grains of Unique. Primers look okay. Cases extracted and ejected fine. My 1914 WRA Co catalog shows a muzzle velocity of 1222 FPS for the factory 32 WCF load. The M92 WHV load attained 1640 FPS using jacketed bullets. I use a soft suede bag rest. I was resting the barrel, just forward of the magazine tube. I know that resting like that is not supposed to be conducive to wringing the inherent accuracy from a rifle, but, the 27-S leaves little to choose from. Next time I will try the receiver rest method and see what happens.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,591 Posts
Roundsworth,

My hybrid 27/27S also shot WAY high, too. With any load I tried. I bought the tallest 1/16" bead Marbles front sight I could find and that helped a lot. It was a quick fix and did not stress the checking account, either. :D And here I thought it was because I put a Marbles tang sight on it. While it shot high, groups were acceptable with the various loads I tried. I finally settled on 9.0/IMR 4227 with the Hornady 100 gr XTP which is good for around 1075 fps from my custom-shortened 18" bbl.

A Union Switch & Signal 45? That would be worth an easy 2 grand on today's market! I carried an Ithaca 45 my 2nd tour in beautiful S.E. Asia. I hear those have become collectible, as well.

BTW, I still see US&S items at work - some of the controls are so marked in older locomotives. SW
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
Top