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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi All

Help please on loading Bullseye powder in a .357 case. For a target loads with lead 159 RNFP 3 grains works very well up to 50 metres. I don't want to hunt. knock plates just target shooting standing unsupported. See results with lead

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I have been given some 158 RNFP FMJ but 3 grains does not work. I thought of maybe something like 3.8
Any thoughts, suggestions appreciated
Thanks all
Grovesie
 

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I haven't found a manual yet that lists less than 10 grains of 2400 for a cast 158 grain or 9 grains for a 158 grain jacketed bullet for a 357 magnum. Even data for the 38 Special starts out with over twice the charge of what you're using.
 

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I think you're on the right track for the jacketed bullets....my Lee manual shows 3.7 for a 160gr jacketed as max...but the online source I go to has a much higher number (stevesreloading) I also think the 3.7gr is for a wheel gun so you should be OK....
 
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I'd sure like to see that manual. Checking through Sierra,Lyman, Hornady, Nosler, Speer, RCBS, and Load All, the lowest starting in a 357 magnum with either cast or jacketed using 2400 was 9.3 grains with a maximum of 15.0 in a Sierra manual. The latest Richard Lee's second edition of modern reloading doesn't even list 2400. What am I missing?
he is asking about "bullseye" not 2400....
 

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Good Lord.....no idea why I got 2400 on my mind. Egg on my face and my blunder.....sorry.

Now that you got me back on track and I poured the coffee back into the pot, my Lee manual shows 4.2 to 4.8 grains of Bullseye for a 158 grain cast. Bumping the charge up to 4.2-4.5 might be what is needed for his needs.
 

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Can't help you with Bullesye I'm afraid but I've had some good results with HP38. Doing the same thing as you i.e. lead bullet Gallery loads. Let me know if you want any recipes.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I haven't found a manual yet that lists less than 10 grains of 2400 for a cast 158 grain or 9 grains for a 158 grain jacketed bullet for a 357 magnum. Even data for the 38 Special starts out with over twice the charge of what you're using.
But I'm not using 2400 I'm using Bullseye. But thanks any way
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I think you're on the right track for the jacketed bullets....my Lee manual shows 3.7 for a 160gr jacketed as max...but the online source I go to has a much higher number (stevesreloading) I also think the 3.7gr is for a wheel gun so you should be OK....
Hi. Yes thanks for that I'll give 3.8 grains a go
Grovesie
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Good Lord.....no idea why I got 2400 on my mind. Egg on my face and my blunder.....sorry.

Now that you got me back on track and I poured the coffee back into the pot, my Lee manual shows 4.2 to 4.8 grains of Bullseye for a 158 grain cast. Bumping the charge up to 4.2-4.5 might be what is needed for his needs.
From what you say I'll start with 3.8 then maybe move up to your idea of 4.2
Thanks
Grovesie
 

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Don't go too low in powder charge weight with FMJ. This has greater barrel friction than a lead bullet, risking a stuck bullet in the barrel if you go too low. That's why you find it unsatisfactory......muzzle velocity is likely quite a bit lower into the "too low" vicinity.

To support the idea of a 3 grain charge of Bullseye with a lead bullet, I regularly use such a charge weight in the much, much larger chambers of .308 and 30-06 rifles. It's perfectly fine to use 3 grains Bullseye in a 357 IF you use a lead bullet of reasonable, 158-200 grain weight.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Don't go too low in powder charge weight with FMJ. This has greater barrel friction than a lead bullet, risking a stuck bullet in the barrel if you go too low. That's why you find it unsatisfactory......muzzle velocity is likely quite a bit lower into the "too low" vicinity.

To support the idea of a 3 grain charge of Bullseye with a lead bullet, I regularly use such a charge weight in the much, much larger chambers of .308 and 30-06 rifles. It's perfectly fine to use 3 grains Bullseye in a 357 IF you use a lead bullet of reasonable, 158-200 grain weight.
Thanks for the info
 

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I'm going to have to double check but it seems I've used 6 gr of BE in my .357 brass. I've used 4 gr in .38 brass with 158 gr HP, but that's pretty hot. My go-to .38 load is 3 gr of BE under a 150 or 158 gr cast SWC.
GH1:)
 

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I cast my own bullets for my two 1894 .357's. One is a first year production 1894 Carbine with an 18.5" microgroove barrel and the other is a 1999 1894CBL with a 24" full octagon ballard rifled barrel. My favorite load using Bullseye is the Lyman 358477, 150 grain plain base bullet. Mine weigh 154 grains lubed using my alloy of wheel weight metal and 8 ounces of tin for each 8 pounds of WW metal.

I load 5.0 grains of Bullseye and a standard small pistol primer in a .357 Mag case with the 358477. From my four inch S&W 19-4 it chronographs 1018 fps and from the 1894C it's speed is 1217 fps. Accuracy in either firearm is superlative and has become my walk about load whenever I am out and about with either or both of those firearms. With the speeds using 5.0 grains of Bullseye I need not fear any man nor beast I may encounter that is bent on doing harm to me or mine.

I like the economics of my 358477 load getting 1400 loadings for each pound of bullseye costing me 0.02 cents per load. Add the cost of 0.03 cents for the primer and I'm still at 0.05 cents per load. That's 1/2 the cost of a 22LR at todays prices of almost 0.10 cents per 22LR round.

Another plus with the above load is that no sight setting change is required at the short ranges it is being used at. My S&W 19-4 and the 1894C are presently sighted in for my high performance load using the Lyman 358156 bullet @ 164 grains lubed and gas checked. I use 15.0 grains of ACC#9 and a standard small pistol primer with the 358156 cast bullet loaded in .357 Magnum cases for a velocity of 1358 fps from S&W 19-4 and 1780 fps from the 1894C. Accuracy with the high performance 358156 loadings is also beyond reproach. At the speeds mentioned it is also a very powerful loading adequate for deer and such to at least 100 yards.

358 Win

PS: Don't let anyone ever tell you that microgroove barrels are not accurate with cast bullet loadings, because they know not what they speak of!!
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Hi all
The acid test. Loaded 30 rounds with 3.8 grains and a total disaster loaded another 30 with 4.4 grains complete success.

Thanks for all your help guys. Just what the forum is all about and have a great weekend

Best

Grovesie

 
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